Strange Fruit: The Day My Mother Yelled ‘Don’t Shoot’ Wednesday, Apr 1 2020 

This week we talk with writer and poet Miguel Machado about his compelling and vulnerable essay, “The Day My Mother Yelled Don’t Shoot,” in which he recounts his startling interaction with police in front of his mother’s Long Island home one morning. Confronted by cops and held at gunpoint after being accidentally locked out of the house, Machado describes a bone-chilling experience he says is all too familiar for Black and brown men – and their mothers.

Listen to the show:


Strange Fruit: Playwright And Poet Idris Goodwin Tuesday, Mar 24 2020 

This week we talk with award-winning playwright and poet Idris Goodwin, who was recently named Director of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College.

Goodwin, former Producing Artistic Director at StageOne Family Theatre in Louisville, tells us how he got his start as a BreakBeat poet – and explains what BreakBeat poetry is.

He is the author of a recently released poetry collection “Can I Kick It?” and will premiere his new play “Ali Summit” at Actors Theatre of Louisville in 2021.

Listen to the show:


 Follow the podcast:

Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | NPR | Spotify | Stitcher | RadioPublic

Strange Fruit For Strange Times Thursday, Mar 19 2020 

Things may be shutting down and folks my be staying in because of COVID-19, but this new episode of Strange Fruit will help pass the time as you (hopefully) practice social distancing.

As the coronavirus outbreak negatively affects communities throughout the country and across the globe, “social distancing” – limiting our in-person interactions with others as a way to stop or slow down the spread – is the recommended way to limit its impact and safeguard our own health and the health of our loved ones and neighbors.

But social distancing is not without collateral damage. This week we discuss the impact of social distancing on our most vulnerable populations and ways we can all cope amidst this global crisis.

Listen to this episode:


Follow the podcast:

Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | NPR | Spotify | Stitcher | RadioPublic

Strange Fruit: Let’s Stay Together (But Sleep Apart) Tuesday, Mar 3 2020 

We can all agree that a good night’s rest is important to productivity, happiness and overall health. But have married and partnered couples been doing it wrong? This week writer Angela Lashbrook joins us to discuss the benefits of “separate togetherness” and makes the case for lovers sleeping apart instead of sharing a bed, which she explores in her piece, “It’s Time to Embrace the Sleep Divorce.”

Later, we speak with Steven Underwood who contends in an essay that “Bisexual Fathers Can Undo the Damage We Inherit From Our Dads.” Because they escape the biphobia and monosexist projections Black bisexual men experience, and because they defy socializing of fatherhood as domineering and sometimes violent, Underwood says that bisexual dads can save us all.

Listen to this episode:


Follow the Strange Fruit podcast:

Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | NPR | Spotify | Stitcher | RadioPublic

Strange Fruit: Teaching Black Students Within Racist School Systems Tuesday, Feb 25 2020 

Our celebration of Black History Month continues and we begin by speaking with Baltimore-area educator Brittany Willis about the perilous plight of Black youth in the American education system — and how she came to realize that in order to save Black children she had to stop being their teacher.

Next up, we talk about the relationship between Black fathers and their sons, as Chicago-based tech and political writer Keith Reid-Cleveland reveals how it took years to learn to love and forgive the father he didn’t meet for the first time until he was twelve years old.

For Juicy Fruit, we’re joined again by linguist Grant Barrett of the American Dialect Society to discuss 2019’s Word of the Year and all the words and phrases that had everybody talking for the last decade.

Listen to the show:


Follow the podcast:

Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | NPR | Spotify | Stitcher | RadioPublic

Strange Fruit: Black Women And Girls Slayed The Decade Thursday, Feb 20 2020 

This week, we recognize Black History Month by reviewing all the ways Black women and girls have been dominating the last decade in fields including politics, entertainment and sports, with culture writer Donnie Belcher, who outlines them in her feature “10 Incredible Years: The Decade in Review for Black Women.”

Later, we speak with New York Times reporter Emily Flitter, whose recent piece, “This Is What Racism Sounds Like in the Banking Industry,” sheds light on the discrimination and inequality she says is “baked in” to the banking industry.

Listen to the episode:


Follow the podcast:

Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | NPR | Spotify | Stitcher | RadioPublic

Strange Fruit: Why Colorblind Doesn’t Cut It In Corporate America Wednesday, Feb 5 2020 

As a Puerto Rican woman and member of the LGBTQ+ community, architect and design professional Yiselle Santos Rivera has always been drawn to firms and companies that advocate diversity. This week she joins us to discuss why in corporate America, it’s okay, and even important, to “see color.”

Later in the show, writer DarkSkyLady reminds us that anti-Black behavior is not exclusively white, as we discuss the viral case of author Natasha Tynes’ prejudicial targeting of a Black woman subway worker in New York City.

Listen to the show:


Follow the Strange Fruit podcast:
Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | NPR | Spotify | Stitcher | RadioPublic

Strange Fruit: Confessions Of A White Liberal Thursday, Jan 30 2020 

This week, Shya Scanlon, a self-described white liberal who penned the essay “I, Racist: Confessions of a White Liberal, tells us how he how and why he began the hard work of acknowledging and unlearning the racist ideas he wasn’t aware he held.

Listen to the show:


 

Podcast:
Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | NPR | Spotify | Stitcher | RadioPublic

Strange Fruit: ‘You’re Pretty, For A ______ Girl’ Thursday, Dec 26 2019 

We’ve all heard the childhood rhyme about sticks and stones breaking bones, but in reality the seemingly-innocuous words and phrases we use to describe one another can hurt.

Words can affect our sense of self-worth or subconsciously reflect the value we find (or don’t find) in others. This week writer and world traveler Renée Cherez Wedderburn points out how hearing phrases like, “you’re so pretty for a dark-skin girl,” from other Black women causes unintentional harm. It’s the topic of her essay “How the Language We Use Perpetuates Oppressive Systems.”

Later in the show, writer Jonita Davis revisits the podcast to discuss the challenges she faced as a Black woman and adjunct professor teaching white college students at a conservative Midwestern university.

Listen to the show:


Strange Fruit: Who Gets A Redemption Story In America? Wednesday, Dec 18 2019 

From Paula Deen, to Brock Turner, to Virginia governor Ralph Northam, we live in a society that allows many white people who commit racist, violent or illegal actions to be punished lightly and quickly forgiven.

This quickness to forgive is present in both the court of public opinion and also within the country’s political and judicial systems.

This week we challenge notions of instant white redemption and second chances with Marley K, an author and advocate whose essay asks, “Why Does A White Man’s Legacy Trump A Black Man’s Trauma?

Listen to the show:


Next Page »