Survey: U of L students concerned about potential return to campus next fall Thursday, May 28 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

Earlier this month, University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi announced the university plans to return to in-person classes for the fall semester. But one Student Government Association survey is finding that more than half of the 214 responses received in the first two days of its launch are concerned with the potential return.

SGA posted a three question survey to its Twitter on May 16, allowing students to voice their concerns about a potential return. SGA’s Top 4 also posted the survey to their personal social media pages. The questions included in the survey were:

  1. What are your concerns about the fall semester?
  2. What resources do you need to be successful in the fall?
  3. Anything else you want us to know?

A response to any one of the questions would be considered a completed survey.

“Many of the responses expressed concerns about having to make an emergency, mid-semester transition in the fall (similar to the one we did in the spring),” SGA told the Cardinal. “A lot of the feedback expressed concerns about safety, social distancing on campus and safe access to University services.”

The student government cautioned that the survey was conducted over social media and is not a representative sample of the student body.

In an email sent May 18, Academic Vice President Ben Barberie provided College of Business professors with “a few notable early trends from the first question.”

54.39% of the responses included some concern about the safety of a return to campus. 19.30% showed concern about plans relating to online classes. 14.91% included some concern about money or expenses related to an in-person fall semester.

“University faculty, staff, administrators and students have been hard at work behind the scenes deliberating many different potential scenarios that could arise this fall,” SGA said. “Throughout the process, SGA has been careful to make sure student concerns are heard and that any approach to this fall is rooted in equity for all students.”

SGA’s survey is ongoing and will remain open throughout the coming weeks.

“We appreciate [student’s] feedback regarding finances, safety, academics, and extracurricular activities. SGA will continue to share these hopes and concerns with the University administration as we advocate for innovative solutions to a wide variety of student concerns,” SGA said.

Graphic by Alexis Simon // The Louisville Cardinal

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Obituary: Graduate student dies Saturday, May 2 2020 

Jonah Neal Liebman, of Louisville, Kentucky, died unexpectedly of unknown causes in his home on April 24, 2020. He was just 25 years old.

Jonah was born on the Fourth of July in 1994 in Louisville, Kentucky. He grew up in the Louisville area, attending Kentucky Country Day School through the ninth grade and graduating from Trinity High School in May 2012. He attended college at Washington University in St. Louis and was a member of Zeta Beta Tau fraternity. He obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Earth Science, graduating in May 2016. In April of 2020, he earned a Master of Science in Applied Geography through the Department of Geography and Geosciences at the University of Louisville. His career ambition was to work as a geoscientist in the parks system.

Jonah was a dear friend to many in the community, having grown up in Louisville his whole life.

As a young child, he competed through the US Chess Federation and played on the national champion kindergarten team. He loved baseball and played from little league through high school, creating many enduring friendships with teammates, families and coaches in St. Matthews, Middletown and Lyndon. Jonah also played travel baseball with the Bats and Panthers and played varsity baseball with the KCD Bearcats and Trinity Shamrocks. He and his family attended The Temple and he became a Bar Mitzvah there.

Jonah is survived by his parents Curt (Amy) Liebman and Karla Guess (John Rademaker), his brother Jared, his sister Shayna, his grandparents Bobby and Betty Guess of Kuttawa, KY, and many loving aunts, uncles and close cousins. He is also survived by Ali Rost, the love of his life. They were looking forward to a bright future and many happy years together.

A memorial service will be held but is unscheduled at this time. Donations may be sent to Red River Gorge United (rrgunited).

Photo Courtesy of The Liebman Family

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Go off the beaten path and take a trip to these uncommon spots at UofL Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Maria Dinh —

There common places on campus that most students like to hang out such as Ekstrom Library, the Student Activities Center and the Belknap Academic Building. Here are some uncommon spots on campus to check out when out for a walk.

Texas Roadhouse Study Lounge – College of Business

Located in the basement of the College of Business, there is a study room that is furnished just like a Texas Roadhouse restaurant. No, this room does not serve bread rolls, but inside has a vending machine with a hot water dispenser so you can make some instant coffee and tea while studying. This lounge isn’t a place for socializing and the noise level is under a whisper.

Dwight Anderson Memorial Music Library – School of Music

To the right of the main doors in the School of Music is a small library full of beautiful indoor plants and an antique piano. Freshman Katherine Boyce has her own favorite quirk about the music library.

She said, “Probably the people, if that counts. People there tend to have more fun and be a bit noisier than in the other libraries. It’s hard to go a single hour without hearing someone there burst into song or start making some sort of music. It makes the atmosphere livelier and more fun than a lot of other places.”

School of Music Stairs – School of Music

In the daytime, these steps look like ordinary steps. On campus at night, color changing lights shine on the steps. The colorful lights are a good opportunity for taking photos to post on Instagram.

Schneider Hall Art Gallery – Schneider Hall

The Speed Art Museum isn’t the only gallery on campus. The Schneider Hall Art Gallery features student artwork from the Hite Art Institute. This is a small exhibit to go and escape. Everyone is welcome to view the art and doors open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Hite Art Institute Fountains – Schneider Hall

The perfect spot to be at on campus when the weather is nice is the fountain at Schneider Hall. This place is perfect to sit back and relax between classes or chat with a friend. 

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Make this year’s dorm a home away from home Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Delaney Hildreth–

As the new semester comes closer, students who will be living on-campus for the year will start planning what they’ll take with them to their dorms in August. Campus Housing has a list of recommended items on their website, but to help newcomers to dorm living, here are some additional things that will make any dorm more inviting and functional.

  One of the most important aspects to prepare for is how much space in the dorm there is to work with, which only gets more complicated when adding a roommate to the mix.

“Dorm rooms don’t typically offer a lot of space, so you have to get creative to make room for all of your belongings,” BusinessInsider.com aptly said. The site offers solutions like plastic drawers to go under beds and over-the-door pocket organizers to maximize storage potential.

They also point out, “You don’t get much space in dorm rooms, so any multi-purpose items are great for capitalizing on what you actually do have.” They recommend items like desk lamps that include USB outlets or laundry hampers that have pockets for laundry supplies.

There are a lot of items that get left behind or overlooked in the hustle of moving in, but these are often the most crucial in dorm living.

Incoming sophomore Dayna Thomas experienced this when moving in last year. “I didn’t have a mattress topper for my bed at first. After a few weeks of sleeping on the dorm provided mattress, I quickly realized why everyone else had mattress toppers and then went and got one for myself,” Thomas said.

Things like trash cans, paper towels, power strips, and dishes are items typically taken for granted, but nonetheless important, especially in a dorm setting where students will spend a lot of their time.

Thomas also said, “One of the most critical things to keep in your dorm is snacks. When everything else on campus is closer and you just need something to get you by, having some snacks on hand in your dorm is a life saver!”

Finally, bring cozy, homey items like rugs, extra pillows, and wall decorations. Dorms are only equipped with the bare necessities, but transforming the room with a few decorative items are sure to turn any dorm into a cozy living space for the year.

These items, while not as functional as the other things mentioned here, are what will make dorm life much more comfortable and satisfactory to take the edge off living in a new location by making it feel more like home.

File photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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Heads up incoming freshman, here’s some advice to survive college Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Blake Wedding —

As orientation draws near, The Cardinal has decided to put together a list for incoming students comprised of helpful hints and suggestions on how to survive and prosper in college.

Attend any and all events 

The first tip that some incoming students may forget the importance of is to take advantage of any and all university events specifically catered to incoming students. These events will not only help students de-stress and get their minds off of studying for a while, but they are also excellent opportunities to meet people, make friends and find groups of like-minded people on campus.

Go to class

This is more of an obvious tip, but it cannot be understated: go to class. There are plenty of upperclassmen and older students at the University of Louisville who have been incredibly successful in their classes over the years because they understand this idea. While it is perfectly okay to miss classes for understandable reasons, one thing to avoid is the pitfall of making a habit out of missing classes.

Make an effort to participate in class as much as possible

One of the biggest issues many students face is that they fail to understand the importance in actively participating in class. Students should try to ask as many questions as possible and to interact with their professors both inside and out of class. This means that by being a more active and engaged student, professors and instructors will notice your initiative and discipline. This is one of the best steps you can take in making your learning in college more positive and fulfilling.

Study 

While it goes without saying that studying is imperative to prospering in college, another equally important thing to keep in mind is to find a proper place to study. A proper study space is all about finding a place where students can decompress, relax and focus foremost on what requires their attention. The library is a great place for many people at U of L to study, but some people tend to prefer local coffee shops around Louisville. It is all about personal preference at the end of the day. 

Make sure to prioritize sleep

Many people have made the mistake of losing sleep in favor of socializing or studying more than their mind and body can take. It might be easy to find yourself losing sleep, but it is something that their body and mind require in order to truly prosper in your classes. 

Graphic by// The Louisville Cardinal

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Cardinals’ basketball wins national championship in virtual simulation Thursday, Apr 23 2020 

By John McCarthy —

With live sports have been suspended during the coronavirus pandemic, there has been an emergence of esports. These simulated games help fill the void of traditional sports leagues now on hiatus.

ESPN took advantage of the opportunity and aired 12 hours of esports which included a Madden NFL20 tournament, a F1 Virtual Grand Prix, the Rocket League World Championship and an NBA 2K players tournament. Along with these events, Madden has also run a Greatest of All-Time tournament featuring the best players from every team. The tournaments utilize advanced algorithms to run the simulations.

One Twitter user, @2020NCAASim2020,  used a similar method to run a simulation on the 2020 March Madness Tournament, and the University of Louisville came out on top to win the virtual National Championship on April 6.

The bracket was based on the final projections from ESPN’s Joe Lunardi. The twitter handle, who is not associated with the NCAA, said “the use of advanced statistical algorithms” helped create the simulation.

In any case, it’s not a real tournament, but with March Madness canceled, this was the closest we could get to the real thing. Louisville won as a virtual No. 4 seed against the virtual No. 1 seed Kansas Jayhawks 74-69 for the virtual national title.

Virtual junior Jordan Nwora led the way with 17 points, virtual freshman David Johnson scored 11 points and virtual senior Dwayne Sutton added 10 points and six rebounds in the fictitious victory.

Shively Sporting Goods is selling a t-shirts in celebration of the victory.

Graphic by ??? // The Louisville Cardinal

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Uncertainty hangs over remaining campus students and resources Monday, Mar 23 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

The Cardinal’s Assistant Editor-in-Chief gives an update on campus life amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Uncertainty hangs over empty walkways and seas of upright chairs. Any other day, a look at an almost empty Ekstrom library and you’d think University of Louisville students were away celebrating some long awaited break.

A week before Spring Break, no one would have predicted U of L President Neeli Bendapudi would make the decision to move classes online until the end of the semester and postpone Spring Commencement.

As the world around us hastily comes to a halt, so does life on U of L’s campuses. While a majority of students are holed up in the apartments or with family preparing for online classes, a few still remain working in “essential” university services like dining or the Campus Store. However as more and more places shut their doors and students are moved out of campus housing, worry continues to grow.

Amber Hurst, a gap year student working at the Campus Bookstore, has been working at the store for five years.

“Things have definitely slowed down a lot, it’s kind of hard to keep being productive,” Hurst said. She said with the state things are in, she’s worried about job security.

Hurst had picked up another job but after working only two weeks, she was told her job would potentially close due to the virus.

“I needed some extra money,” Hurst said. “And now with the Bookstore’s status, I’m a little bit worried.”

Across campus, the Ekstrom Starbucks has noticed a similar drop in traffic. Senior shift manager Davy Adams said they are getting a fair amount of customers in a given hour.

“It depends on the day too,” they said.

Policy changes because of the virus are also evident across U of L’s campus. Restaurants have removed all dine-in seating encouraging customers to continue practicing social distancing. Cleaning has also had an overhaul.

“We have to wipe down all surfaces every 20 minutes. Anything that we are touching with our hands we have to wipe down,” Adams said. They wish though that face masks could be provided for extra precaution. “A few people that work for Campus Dining have them, but they bring them from home,” Adams said.

Adams admitted they don’t feel particularly safe being back, even despite the lack of students. This was a common sentiment among many of the remaining student workers.

“I’m here because I have to make money,” they said. “I don’t want to say that I’m petrified to work here, I feel like we’re doing the best we can do. But as a working class person, what are you gonna do? You gotta work, you gotta make money.”

Even with the closures, and students being told March 18 to leave campus housing, there were still some resources available for students.

Kathy Meyer, assistant director of student leadership, said the Cardinal Cupboard, U of L’s first food pantry, will remain open during the campus closure as long as the SAC remains open. The pantry can be found in room W314.

“In the event that the Cardinal Cupboard must close, we recommend those in need of food search the Dare to Care distribution webpage for a list of mobile pantries and stationary pantries,” Meyer said.

Meyer also suggested students finding themselves in financial emergencies during this time apply for the Louis and Louise W. Wisser Bornwasser Emergency Fund. The fund’s goal is to “assist University of Louisville students who encounter an unforeseen emergency or catastrophic event,” said the Dean of Student’s website.

Photo by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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Stay or leave? Students are being left up with that decision Friday, Mar 20 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many businesses and other public places are shutting down for safety and health reasons. This includes colleges as well, meaning the University of Louisville is partially closing their doors to students and adapting to help protect students from the virus.

Because of these new changes, many students are left with the decision of either staying on campus to finish out the rest of the semester or traveling back home to complete coursework there.

Among the students who have left campus, sophomore Roni Wolfe is choosing to stay at her house to help reduce the stress.

“I don’t have to leave my room to eat or get anything if I’m home. I have all of that stuff and I’m with my family,” Wolfe said.

She said that because of the decision to switch to online classes and still not knowing what to do until a professor emails with direction, she is a little stressed out and worried. However, she is glad she is home and that everyone is trying not to navigate onto campus where there is a chance of spreading the virus.

In the meantime, Wolfe is spending time with her family while also preparing for online classes.

“I’m mostly just making a list of what my professors want us to do and when so I can keep track and not have to spend all of my free time stressing about it if I forgot something,” she said.

However, there are still students who want to stay on campus in Louisville.

Even though senior Emily Yadon has seen many people packing up and leaving for the rest of the spring semester, she must stay along with the few people who are still on campus.

“Luckily, dining is open, so food is somewhat available at limited hours,” Yadon said. “I’m hoping they won’t close with restaurants being forced to close. If so, I will need to go home since I won’t have a good place to cook and have limited access to food.”

She said it is important to keep practicing isolation and social distancing even if its draining and not enjoyable. Yadon said it is to protect others especially the older generations and people who have underlying health conditions.

Even if it’s not fun having to be inside all day long, there are still many ways to pass the time.

“I’ve been spending time playing board games with a few of friends who are also on campus. That’s pretty entertaining and enjoyable and it doesn’t involve going out where there’s a lot of people,” Yadon said.

However, due to recent changes sent out to students by email, many will have to move out by March 29 unless they sign up to stay on campus.

If the plan is to move out of the dorms, remember to fill out the cancellation form on the housing portal and to fill out the express checkout form and turn them in along with the dorm’s key when leaving for the rest of the semester.

However, if a student is choosing to stay, remember to let housing know you will be staying by signing into the housing portal and requesting to stay on campus by March 27th.

File photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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Students share their culture’s traditions at the Festival of Languages Tuesday, Mar 17 2020 

By Alex Tompkins —

The University of Louisville hosted the “Festival of Languages: Cultures around the World” event in the Red Barn March 4. The festival is way for students to learn the importance of different cultures around the world. 

Upon entry, the event was already a massive scene: parades of students and faculty, flying paper fish and the aroma of amazing dishes from around the world. The event hosted culturally specific acts on stage such as belly dancing, interactive Tai Chi, Chinese yo-yo and a live band performing Latin American music. 

Multiple booths were set up to represent different cultures and provide facts and fun activities relating to the cultures showcased. There were even pastries and dishes being handed out from each booth to give students a taste of different foods. 

Among the booths were Latin America, Germany and China. Each booth was accompanied by eager student volunteers that were knowledgeable about their booth’s culture.

Germany’s booth was set up much like the others; a tri-fold with facts and a table with treats specific to the culture. Students were taught a German greeting, and upon learning the response, they were rewarded with their choice of treats to choose from, including sweet tea, ginger cookies and chocolate cake.

It was obvious that each student was invested and truly involved in learning the cultures of the booth they worked at or visited. Not only were some students learning about different cultures, but others were teaching them. 

Many wore traditional garb, including festival wear specific to the country’s annual holidays and events. 

Many students were fascinated and pleased with the other booths and the inclusivity the event had to offer. 

“I think the event was important in helping people to understand how language could allow different opportunities and ways to connect with others from different cultures,” said junior Sarah Coffman. “It brings awareness to all of the different languages spoken, even here on campus.”

Photo by Anthony Riley 

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Martin Luther King Day celebrated through theatre Monday, Mar 16 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

Many things occurred during Martin Luther King Jr. Day, one of those events was the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebration at the Thrust theatre. It was hosted by The University of Louisville’s African American Theatre Program & the Yearlings Club Forum Series.

This year’s annual event’s theme is “A Dream and A Vision” where a theatrical celebration took place in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. The event had many different aspects throughout the show.

It began with actors Aliyah Brutley, Tyler Tate, Kala Ross enacting a short play called “Is This the Dream?” which was written by Brutley. All three actors started out in the audience and questioning about whether the dream that Martin Luther King Jr. had is still achieved today by talking about the issues that many African Americans face in society.

This introduction to the celebration soon gave way to greetings by Assistant Professor and Director of the AATP Johhny Jones who welcomed the guests. Soon afterwards, Yearlings Club President Sedge Parker shared her greetings which was followed by A & S Interim Dean, Dr. David Owen.

After introduction, the celebration finally begins with an act titled “Bound by Blood” written Clinnesha Sibley. The scene takes place at the Lorrain Motel in Memphis, Tennessee during the night after Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated.  Actor Candance Spencer portrays Jackie who is a housekeeper and a resident of Lorraine Motel who has a conversation with Theatrice Bailey being portrayed by Lamar Hardy. Both characters talk about the aftermath of MLK’s death along with the consequences soon to come.

Following this tense act, there was a short trivia game hosted by Charles Nasby where the audience got to participate, and answer question related to Martin Luther King Jr such as which fraternity he belonged in. Those who guessed correctly won tickets to Detroit ’67.

Then there was dance performance provided the Satin Rhythm Dance Team who are from Simmons College. Soon the Program Coordinator of the Department of Theatre Arts Jessica Keys introduced the keynote speaker, Chief Equity Officer Kellie Watson who gave her speech.

After the speech, “This will Be” was performed by AATP Members with Alex Gordon on piano and Manny Viveros providing bass. The pop song was released in 1975 by artist Natalie Cole in her album, Inseparable

The final performance of the afternoon was a step performance by the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

The celebration ended with the award ceremony of Lift Every Voice Awards which was given to co-founder and director of the African American Heritage Foundation Clestine Lanier for her work in public service and non-profit administration.  This was followed by “Lift Every Voice and Sing” where members of the audience joined in the cast on stage in singing this song as a final ballad for the celebration.

Many more things are in the works by The University of Louisville’s African American Theatre Program. Throughout the whole month of January and to April, there will be a series of plays going on during these months starting with Detroit ’67 which is already in Thrust Theatre until Feb 2.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

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