Shows and movies to watch on Netflix to help get through social distancing Wednesday, Apr 1 2020 

Features editor Zoe Watkins shares some Netflix recommendations to watch while at home due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

By Zoe Watkins–

There’s a lot of free time on everyone’s hands now since social-distancing practices have been extended until the end of April. However, do not fret, as there are still a lot of activities one can being doing around the house, such as watching an abundance of shows and movies. Since the masses voted earlier this year about what their favorite streaming services are, here are some picks of TV shows and movies from the popular Netflix platform to watch during these times.

Hairspray (2007)

It’s an oldie, but a goodie. This musical turned movie brings out that energetic feeling with its sing-along songs.

The movie follows Tracy Turnblad in Baltimore of 1962. When she and her friend get the chance to audition for their favorite dance show, Tracy was able make it onto Corny Collins though angering the current reigning dance queen in the process. Soon, Tracy learns that black kids are only able to dance on the show once a month which she decides isn’t fair. With the help of her friends, Tracy helps bring racial integration to the show and in the process hopefully become the new dancing queen of the Corny Collins Show.

This song-packed movie is a good way to sing away the blues during these troubling times.

Black Mirror (2011)

If feel-good movies aren’t the best to watch right now, there are still some dark shows that could catch someone’s interest. “Black Mirror” is just one of those series that likes to mess with the idea of technology being taken too far.

If something a bit more dark and mature sounds appealing, then this would be the best fit as freshman Heather Martin would describe this series.

“I would not start it if you don’t do good with character deaths but if you do, the story line with the main character and his internal struggle keeps you interested and on your toes,” Martin said.

Our Planet (2019)

If the inside is starting to grate on the nerves, this documentary series will provide some relief and help bring some nature into the home.

Even though there are only eight episodes, each one is about 50 minutes. The series documents a variety of differing ecosystems around the world. From the reefs of the vibrant seas to the windy grasslands of North America, the show views all sorts of aspects of mother nature.

The Good Place (2016)

This show offers its own comedic twist to what the afterlife is like especially when someone ends up going to the wrong place.

The show first comes off as just any regular comedic show, but soon offers its own random quirks that make it special such as how the main character must solve her own mistakes that have crept into the utopian world. It also offers a good story-line that usually isn’t shown in these types of shows and it can sometimes become emotional.

“The Good Place comes off as something that sound like a normal sitcome but the jokes and twists keep you going back to it,” Martin said.

Other recommendations: “The Witcher” (2019), “My Girl” (1991), “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” (1975), and “Gilmore Girls” (2000)

File photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Graphic design student combines both art and social impact in her work Monday, Mar 30 2020 

By Zoe Watkins —

For Virtual Portfolio Preview Day, a senior graphic design major shared some of her work and reflected on her journey.

Though she is from Louisville, Taylor Simone first began her college career at Arizona State University before transferring to University of Louisville. Her time at ASU was what first started her interest in graphic design.

“ASU is where I gained my love for visual communication, although I was studying film at the time,” she said. “In my first semester attending U of L, I took an intro class to graphic design and immediately switched my major.”

Simone said the reason she loves graphic design is because it combines both of her two passions, art and social impact.

“I love graphic design because I can address topics like racial injustice and be creative while doing it,” She said.

Even if her designing process varies on each of her pieces, Simone states that she loves the research aspect.

“Having a strong understanding of the content is always the first step in my design process,” Simone said.

When finding inspiration for her pieces, Simone looks in a lot of different place, but is mostly inspired by real stories and experiences.

“I am intrigued by how a design can speak to a certain emotion or an experience that we all go through. I am heavily inspired by designs that bring people together in hopes of creating dialogue and discourse.

She said that her favorite piece in her portfolio is a book called “When Words Unravel.” The book goes over the historical and cultural analysis of the n-word. Simone designed and wrote the book during her third year in a Bookforms class at U of L.

“This book is my favorite piece because it captures so many of my interests in one project. I also learned so much since I got to interview different people about their experience with this word and its history,” she said.

When asked for advice for students who are also in graphic design or considering in majoring, Simone said to take their time to absorb as much as they can.

“As a design student, you don’t need to focus in one area. Learning as much as you can about all kinds of design methods and processes is the most rewarding part about studying graphic design.” Simone states.

Photo courtesy by Alexis Simone // The Louisville Cardinal

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Despite not being able to meet, RSOs are still finding ways to engage Thursday, Mar 26 2020 

By Victoria Doll —

All on-campus events and activities have been cancelled until further notice due to the spread of COVID-19. According to the University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi, online instruction is extended to the end of the semester and so are final exams; therefore, all campus events are suspended as well. 

In her latest email, Bendapudi said, “Events hosted by any University of Louisville entity or at any University of Louisville facility are to be postponed or cancelled through at least April 28th.” 

Even though there are no in-person meeting times for U of L’s clubs, there are still ways to participate and stay engaged. According to Julia Onnembo, University of Louisville’s assistant director of student involvement, a great way to stay engaged is to use the Engage website to cast your vote to elect your RSO Officers.

She said, “Engage has a great election program that you can use to run a virtual ballot in your individual portals.”  

Another way that campus RSOs are staying engaged is through group chats. A lot of clubs are maintaining communication through the app GroupMe or other mass messaging apps. 

To keep business flowing as normal as possible, some clubs use the platform Zoom to host online meetings and hold elections. For example, The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS) club on campus continues to host meetings through Zoom to discuss basic club information and how to move forward. 

NSCS’s President Ashley Ward, said, “These unprecedented times call for leaders who can adapt to abrupt changes. As a student leader of an RSO, my fellow officers and I have agreed to continue to offer open communication.” 

She continued to say that she encourages all RSOs to adjust as best as possible. “Student leaders need to adjust to online meetings, emails, social media and independent activities. Our primary purpose right now is to be an outlet for questions and concerns. Since we have quickly learned to adapt to an online campus, I know that we can face future challenges.”

Ashley has hope that even though these times are challenging, next semester the NSCS club and the community of U of L will be closer as a community. 

Overall, there isn’t much that anyone can do besides focus on classes and help the cause by staying inside and following other CDC guidelines.

Bendapudi concluded her email with some thoughtful advice and words of encouragement. “Despite all the busy-ness, I hope you will take a moment to pause.  Slow down.  Anchor yourself in what matters most to you. Together we will persevere through this tumultuous time and come out the other side a stronger, more unified university community.” 

File photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Uncertainty hangs over remaining campus students and resources Monday, Mar 23 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

The Cardinal’s Assistant Editor-in-Chief gives an update on campus life amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Uncertainty hangs over empty walkways and seas of upright chairs. Any other day, a look at an almost empty Ekstrom library and you’d think University of Louisville students were away celebrating some long awaited break.

A week before Spring Break, no one would have predicted U of L President Neeli Bendapudi would make the decision to move classes online until the end of the semester and postpone Spring Commencement.

As the world around us hastily comes to a halt, so does life on U of L’s campuses. While a majority of students are holed up in the apartments or with family preparing for online classes, a few still remain working in “essential” university services like dining or the Campus Store. However as more and more places shut their doors and students are moved out of campus housing, worry continues to grow.

Amber Hurst, a gap year student working at the Campus Bookstore, has been working at the store for five years.

“Things have definitely slowed down a lot, it’s kind of hard to keep being productive,” Hurst said. She said with the state things are in, she’s worried about job security.

Hurst had picked up another job but after working only two weeks, she was told her job would potentially close due to the virus.

“I needed some extra money,” Hurst said. “And now with the Bookstore’s status, I’m a little bit worried.”

Across campus, the Ekstrom Starbucks has noticed a similar drop in traffic. Senior shift manager Davy Adams said they are getting a fair amount of customers in a given hour.

“It depends on the day too,” they said.

Policy changes because of the virus are also evident across U of L’s campus. Restaurants have removed all dine-in seating encouraging customers to continue practicing social distancing. Cleaning has also had an overhaul.

“We have to wipe down all surfaces every 20 minutes. Anything that we are touching with our hands we have to wipe down,” Adams said. They wish though that face masks could be provided for extra precaution. “A few people that work for Campus Dining have them, but they bring them from home,” Adams said.

Adams admitted they don’t feel particularly safe being back, even despite the lack of students. This was a common sentiment among many of the remaining student workers.

“I’m here because I have to make money,” they said. “I don’t want to say that I’m petrified to work here, I feel like we’re doing the best we can do. But as a working class person, what are you gonna do? You gotta work, you gotta make money.”

Even with the closures, and students being told March 18 to leave campus housing, there were still some resources available for students.

Kathy Meyer, assistant director of student leadership, said the Cardinal Cupboard, U of L’s first food pantry, will remain open during the campus closure as long as the SAC remains open. The pantry can be found in room W314.

“In the event that the Cardinal Cupboard must close, we recommend those in need of food search the Dare to Care distribution webpage for a list of mobile pantries and stationary pantries,” Meyer said.

Meyer also suggested students finding themselves in financial emergencies during this time apply for the Louis and Louise W. Wisser Bornwasser Emergency Fund. The fund’s goal is to “assist University of Louisville students who encounter an unforeseen emergency or catastrophic event,” said the Dean of Student’s website.

Photo by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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Shop Impromptu still providing service even with doors closed Friday, Mar 20 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

Though many stores are closing until the coronavirus pandemic has settled, there are some who have found ways to keep open.

Shop Impromptu is owned and run by University of Louiville alumnus Jordan Mannel. The boutique store sells women’s clothing, shoes, accessories and home decorations.

Mannel said she began her business in 2016 by starting it as an online boutique in her living room. She mostly relied on online ads the first year, but her business quickly took off.

“As it grew, I expanded into a 550 square feet showroom in Butchertown to get it out of my home. We quickly got there and moved into the mall in October of 2018. We occupied 1100 square feet and I gained a staff of about 6 people. In July 2019, we moved into a 6000 square feet store in Oxmoor across from Apple & Sephora,” Mannel said.

In the beginning, Mannel’s inventory primarily consisted of derby fashion which she said is how she got started.

“Everyone wanted me to dress them for Derby. My mom makes all the hats and fascinators, and I sell more in Derby season than in Christmas season,” Mannel said.

Even though Shop Impromptu had to close for the time being, Mannel said it was the right decision.

“I feel I did the right thing by closing my door early Saturday to ensure we take precautions of not spreading COVID-19. People were not staying inside, and I did not want to be the one to give them a place to go,” she said.

Since Shop Impromptu sells more derby fashion than anything else, she said it will be a hard time.

“I currently have a staff of 12 and with all the current events, doing my best to make sure what I’ve created stays afloat,” she said.

But there’s still hope for stores to keep going and make money even with their storefront closed. Such as with Shop Impromptu, there is an online store and a Facebook page where customers can still order products which Mannel said can go a long way.

“Buy online if it something they are something, purchase gift cards, share their posts and comment on their posts. All of these simple things can help,” she said.

Even though everything may seem rough right now, and there is still a lot of uncertainty, there is still some advice that can be shared.

“It’s going to be okay, we are all in this together. And lucky for us, most of your derby dresses will still be in season for the beginning of September,” Mannel said.

Photo courtesy by Jordan Mannel

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Stay or leave? Students are being left up with that decision Friday, Mar 20 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many businesses and other public places are shutting down for safety and health reasons. This includes colleges as well, meaning the University of Louisville is partially closing their doors to students and adapting to help protect students from the virus.

Because of these new changes, many students are left with the decision of either staying on campus to finish out the rest of the semester or traveling back home to complete coursework there.

Among the students who have left campus, sophomore Roni Wolfe is choosing to stay at her house to help reduce the stress.

“I don’t have to leave my room to eat or get anything if I’m home. I have all of that stuff and I’m with my family,” Wolfe said.

She said that because of the decision to switch to online classes and still not knowing what to do until a professor emails with direction, she is a little stressed out and worried. However, she is glad she is home and that everyone is trying not to navigate onto campus where there is a chance of spreading the virus.

In the meantime, Wolfe is spending time with her family while also preparing for online classes.

“I’m mostly just making a list of what my professors want us to do and when so I can keep track and not have to spend all of my free time stressing about it if I forgot something,” she said.

However, there are still students who want to stay on campus in Louisville.

Even though senior Emily Yadon has seen many people packing up and leaving for the rest of the spring semester, she must stay along with the few people who are still on campus.

“Luckily, dining is open, so food is somewhat available at limited hours,” Yadon said. “I’m hoping they won’t close with restaurants being forced to close. If so, I will need to go home since I won’t have a good place to cook and have limited access to food.”

She said it is important to keep practicing isolation and social distancing even if its draining and not enjoyable. Yadon said it is to protect others especially the older generations and people who have underlying health conditions.

Even if it’s not fun having to be inside all day long, there are still many ways to pass the time.

“I’ve been spending time playing board games with a few of friends who are also on campus. That’s pretty entertaining and enjoyable and it doesn’t involve going out where there’s a lot of people,” Yadon said.

However, due to recent changes sent out to students by email, many will have to move out by March 29 unless they sign up to stay on campus.

If the plan is to move out of the dorms, remember to fill out the cancellation form on the housing portal and to fill out the express checkout form and turn them in along with the dorm’s key when leaving for the rest of the semester.

However, if a student is choosing to stay, remember to let housing know you will be staying by signing into the housing portal and requesting to stay on campus by March 27th.

File photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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Tips for adjusting to online classes Wednesday, Mar 18 2020 

By Matthew Keck — 

Every student at the University of Louisville is facing the task of adjusting to online classes for the foreseeable future. For students who have taken online classes in the past, this is no issue.

As for those who haven’t, Kristen Brown, associate director of online learning at U of L, has provided tips to make this transition as smooth as possible.

Check In Daily

Brown says that students who want to make their online transition a successful one need to check in daily. “Just like in a live classroom, there may be discussions taking place or updates from your teacher, so being present in your virtual classroom is essential for staying engaged,” she says.

And this doesn’t mean checking in once a day. She suggests checking in multiple times each day to make sure students aren’t missing any information for their classes.

“Students need to be sure they are clear on the faculty member’s expectations in terms of communication (frequency and methods), and due dates for assignments,” says Brown.

Manage Your Time

While there is no set “time” for classes anymore, students must keep in mind that there are still due dates or real-time lectures to attend. With that in mind, it is a good idea to set aside time, like you would for normal classes, to stay on top of things.

“Laying out a plan to stay engaged in all of your online courses will be essential,” says Brown. “Since your course schedule will not revolve around regular in-person class sessions, you must be able to set a schedule that allows you to meet course deadlines.”

This new online territory can be tricky, but balancing your time can make it less hectic.

Communicate

Nothing is more frustrating than not knowing what to do or how to do it. So, to make sure that doesn’t happen, Brown says students need to communicate with their respective professors.

“One of the most important things that we can all do to ensure the success of an online course is to communicate well and communicate often,” she says.

“By engaging with the faculty member, other students and the course material, students will be able to make the most of their online courses,” says Brown. “Asking questions, taking notes, and staying organized will help tremendously.”

This is a first time experience for many of professors as well, so communicating with them helps make this a more successful experience for both sides.

Use Resources

Lastly, Brown says students should take advantage of the resources that will help them during these times.

“Students should use the resources available to them on track,” she says. “Advisors will be available remotely, and the university will continue to offer its virtual support through the Writing CenterREACH and the Library.”

Brown also provided a list of technological resources for students:

Again, this way of operating is new for mostly everyone involved. Remain patient, keep these tips in mind, communicate and make the end of the semester a good one.

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Students share their culture’s traditions at the Festival of Languages Tuesday, Mar 17 2020 

By Alex Tompkins —

The University of Louisville hosted the “Festival of Languages: Cultures around the World” event in the Red Barn March 4. The festival is way for students to learn the importance of different cultures around the world. 

Upon entry, the event was already a massive scene: parades of students and faculty, flying paper fish and the aroma of amazing dishes from around the world. The event hosted culturally specific acts on stage such as belly dancing, interactive Tai Chi, Chinese yo-yo and a live band performing Latin American music. 

Multiple booths were set up to represent different cultures and provide facts and fun activities relating to the cultures showcased. There were even pastries and dishes being handed out from each booth to give students a taste of different foods. 

Among the booths were Latin America, Germany and China. Each booth was accompanied by eager student volunteers that were knowledgeable about their booth’s culture.

Germany’s booth was set up much like the others; a tri-fold with facts and a table with treats specific to the culture. Students were taught a German greeting, and upon learning the response, they were rewarded with their choice of treats to choose from, including sweet tea, ginger cookies and chocolate cake.

It was obvious that each student was invested and truly involved in learning the cultures of the booth they worked at or visited. Not only were some students learning about different cultures, but others were teaching them. 

Many wore traditional garb, including festival wear specific to the country’s annual holidays and events. 

Many students were fascinated and pleased with the other booths and the inclusivity the event had to offer. 

“I think the event was important in helping people to understand how language could allow different opportunities and ways to connect with others from different cultures,” said junior Sarah Coffman. “It brings awareness to all of the different languages spoken, even here on campus.”

Photo by Anthony Riley 

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Activities to do while socially distancing yourself Tuesday, Mar 17 2020 

Writer Matthew Keck wrote some advice on what to do while people are isolated at home and practicing social distancing.

By Matthew Keck — 

Socially distancing yourself may seem like a monotonous and mind-numbing task, but it doesn’t have to be boring. During these trying times, there are plenty of things one can do to stay productive and occupied.

YouTube

If there were ever a time where binge watching YouTube for hours was acceptable, it would be now. But you can turn this into a more productive activity.

Instead of watching someone vlogging in Los Angeles or New York City living their wonderful lives, try out tutorials or educational videos. From Ted talks to learning about photography, there is bound to be an informational video out there for everyone.

This turns an activity that is normally unacceptable into one that keeps you busy but also leaves you with new skills.

Declutter

Clear out your fridge, get rid of that sweatshirt you never wear and reorganize your home space. All of these can be relaxing and are productive.

Getting rid of unnecessary things may just be what we all need to help alleviate some stress in our lives right now. And it doesn’t hurt to make some money while selling the clothes you’re getting rid of.

If you’re going to be stuck in the same place for an extended period of time, it doesn’t hurt to change up the scenery. Plus, this is a great way to take your looming mind off of what’s happening outside.

Exercise

Summer is still right around the corner, so this isn’t the time to start slacking off. Instead, with seemingly more time, amp up your exercise routine but just stay away from the gym.

Chances are your home space is big enough to do bodyweight workouts or you can introduce a new type of exercise. Combining this and YouTube, introducing yoga would be ideal. It doesn’t require a large space to perform the exercises and you’ll have a new workout to love.

Stay Connected

Most importantly during these isolating times, stay connected with the ones you love. It can be easy to think that this pandemic will secede soon, but it doesn’t hurt to call the ones you care about.

Almost everyone has smartphones or computers now, so Facetiming or Skyping is not farfetched. At the very least, text your closest friends and family every day just to see how they’re doing.

This can also benefit yourself, knowing that you aren’t alone.

With boredom bound to set in, try some of these activities out and stave away that feeling as long as you can. You might just come out of this pandemic a little more emotionally, physically and mentally stronger.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

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Starbuck’s menu offers more than that meets the eye Monday, Mar 16 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

The Starbucks’s menu offers a variety of drinks that can cater to anyone’s taste. Though if someone is getting tired of that regular Vanilla Bean Crème, there are some secret items that customers can order to try out.

However, it’s technically not Starbuck’s official “secret menu”, but many people don’t realize how customizable their drink can be which makes up many of the items on the menu. And by the means of being customizable, according to starbuckssecretmenu.net, there are over 200 drink recipes that anyone can order.

The most knowledgeable about the menu itself comes from the people who makes the drinks themselves, the baristas.

Junior Amanda Schweinzger says that she likes to make the Red Velvet Frappe since it reminds her of her childhood.

“I like red velvet cake to begin with, so having that in a frappe just makes it easier,” she says. The Red Velvet Frappe is a Vanilla Bean Frappe with red velvet cake blended in along with raspberry syrup.

Even though these drinks aren’t official drinks, Schweizger says the more that people order these drinks, the more common they become.

“A lot of people get their recipes off Pinterest and there’s a lot of ‘how to order’,” She says.

There is still a lot more than the Red Velvet Frappe. While junior Max Valentines likes the Strawberry Cheesecake Frappuccino, senior Davie Adams enjoys the Mixed Berry Frappe. Adams explained that he enjoys customizing the drinks and how it makes the drink much better.

Some more popular and common secret drinks is the Purple drink, which is Passion Iced Tea mixed with soy milk, vanilla syrup with some blackberries on top. Another is Butterbeer Frappuccino that takes a Crème Frappuccino and three pumps of each caramel and toffee-nut syrup.

There are a lot of options to go about when trying to plan for that creative Frappuccino, but keep in mind that the one who will be making the drink might not know how to make it.

As said before, none of these drinks are official, so when someone asks for a Fall-in-a-Cup Latte, the barista will have no clue what that means. So, when ordering one these secret drinks, start with the base and add on for what the recipe calls for.

Photo by Zoe Watkins//The Louisville Cardinal

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