Stranger secretly pays for little girl’s glasses after overhearing her mom worrying about the cost Friday, Jun 26 2020 

The Houston mom is trying to find and thank the Good Samaritan after the unexpected purchase left her speechless and in tears.

        

Disneyland postpones theme park, resort reopenings in California Thursday, Jun 25 2020 

The company said without guidelines from California, they'll have to postpone their original reopening plans.

        

67th annual WHAS Crusade For Children now Aug. 8-9 Wednesday, Jun 24 2020 

The Crusade will look different this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

        

Seattle performer sings his heart out in ‘Quarantine Musicals’ Wednesday, May 20 2020 

Tavo Gutierrez is producing the medleys from inside his Ballard apartment.

        

Miracle Monocle perseveres and publishes its 14th issue amid pandemic Tuesday, Apr 28 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

In the need of new reading material during quarantine? The English department’s award-winning online literary journal “Miracle Monocle,” has just released its 14th issue after overcoming many setbacks.

“Miracle Monocle” publishes twice a year and brings together a wide array of literary work and visual art pieces. These are then handpicked by a student editorial staff led by faculty editor, Dr. Sarah Strickley.

Since there are over 500 submissions every issue, Strickley said that there is a selection process to pick what goes in the journal. During this process, the staff reads and responds to each individual submission.

“The pieces that gain the most positive attention in our submission management system process go to a second round of consideration. We then narrow down the picks from there. We also solicit pieces from writers and artists whose work we admire but those pieces represent only a fraction of our contributors overall,” Strickley said.

The latest 14th issue was a challenging one to publish. Strickley said that the COVID-19 pandemic caused many logistical challenges. For example, their weekly in-person meetings now took place over Zoom and communication among staff took place online using Outlook’s Teams function.

The staff also had to change dates for some future publications such as “Monster, which is the next installment in the print anthology series. It has been postponed until the fall semester.

Despite all of this, the staff still managed to put together a full issue, which Strickley described as truly beautiful.

“I’m very proud of the fact that we came in on deadline and I’m awed by the fact that four students wrote reviews of new books for Issue 14. Truly exceptional work,” she said.

Amy Dotson, a graduating senior with an English major and Creative Writing minor, served as an associate editor. Dotson said publishing the issue during a pandemic was strange. She said that the process of editing and coding pieces were the same, but there could not be a launch event for the issue.

However, Dotson explained that everyone worked hard on their own time to meet the deadline and gave praise to the work Strickley and assistant editor Adam Yeich put into the journal.

“It’s because of their tireless efforts that the journal is what it is. It’s a labor of love. And we all love it. So, we made it happen. Hopefully, this issue is a little ray of light for many in an otherwise dark time,” Dotson said.

She said her favorite part of making the issue was reading through all the submissions.

“People can send in some strange things, so going through submissions can be like winding a jack-in-the-box,” Dotson explained. “But that’s kind of what I love–how every time you open a new submission, you’re hoping it’s going to be the next incredible piece of work. And sometimes it is!”

Ashley Bittner, one of the two graduate editors for the “Miracle Monocle,” said going through the submissions was his favorite part as well, as they provided insight into a world that he has not seen or experienced yet.

“Papers come in from around the world, all writers with something to stay, and reading over it is very cosmopolitan,” Bittner said.

He said that his favorite pieces currently are Kendyl Harmeling’s “An Unbecoming End” and Emily Beck Cogburn’s “Crossing the River.”

Now with issue 14 released, Strickley described the end of this editorial cycle as bittersweet.

“I’m always excited to send a new issue into the world, but that also means that I’m graduating a staff, which is a real loss on both a personal and professional level. This time around that contradiction was even more pronounced for me,” she said.

Strickley said that they could have eased production or stopped altogether, but they persevered through it all.  She said that this semester had a moving outcome, however unusual and fraught it was.

“I want to thank my staff for renewing my faith in the project of the journal. It’s about bringing people together to celebrate art, right? In a time when we can’t occupy the same literal space, it’s more important than ever to come together in the realm of ideas. And that’s exactly what we’ve done,” Strickley said.

If you would like to check out the latest issue, go to http://louisville.edu/miraclemonocle.

File graphic// The Louisville Cardinal

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Go off the beaten path and take a trip to these uncommon spots at UofL Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Maria Dinh —

There common places on campus that most students like to hang out such as Ekstrom Library, the Student Activities Center and the Belknap Academic Building. Here are some uncommon spots on campus to check out when out for a walk.

Texas Roadhouse Study Lounge – College of Business

Located in the basement of the College of Business, there is a study room that is furnished just like a Texas Roadhouse restaurant. No, this room does not serve bread rolls, but inside has a vending machine with a hot water dispenser so you can make some instant coffee and tea while studying. This lounge isn’t a place for socializing and the noise level is under a whisper.

Dwight Anderson Memorial Music Library – School of Music

To the right of the main doors in the School of Music is a small library full of beautiful indoor plants and an antique piano. Freshman Katherine Boyce has her own favorite quirk about the music library.

She said, “Probably the people, if that counts. People there tend to have more fun and be a bit noisier than in the other libraries. It’s hard to go a single hour without hearing someone there burst into song or start making some sort of music. It makes the atmosphere livelier and more fun than a lot of other places.”

School of Music Stairs – School of Music

In the daytime, these steps look like ordinary steps. On campus at night, color changing lights shine on the steps. The colorful lights are a good opportunity for taking photos to post on Instagram.

Schneider Hall Art Gallery – Schneider Hall

The Speed Art Museum isn’t the only gallery on campus. The Schneider Hall Art Gallery features student artwork from the Hite Art Institute. This is a small exhibit to go and escape. Everyone is welcome to view the art and doors open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Hite Art Institute Fountains – Schneider Hall

The perfect spot to be at on campus when the weather is nice is the fountain at Schneider Hall. This place is perfect to sit back and relax between classes or chat with a friend. 

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Make this year’s dorm a home away from home Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Delaney Hildreth–

As the new semester comes closer, students who will be living on-campus for the year will start planning what they’ll take with them to their dorms in August. Campus Housing has a list of recommended items on their website, but to help newcomers to dorm living, here are some additional things that will make any dorm more inviting and functional.

  One of the most important aspects to prepare for is how much space in the dorm there is to work with, which only gets more complicated when adding a roommate to the mix.

“Dorm rooms don’t typically offer a lot of space, so you have to get creative to make room for all of your belongings,” BusinessInsider.com aptly said. The site offers solutions like plastic drawers to go under beds and over-the-door pocket organizers to maximize storage potential.

They also point out, “You don’t get much space in dorm rooms, so any multi-purpose items are great for capitalizing on what you actually do have.” They recommend items like desk lamps that include USB outlets or laundry hampers that have pockets for laundry supplies.

There are a lot of items that get left behind or overlooked in the hustle of moving in, but these are often the most crucial in dorm living.

Incoming sophomore Dayna Thomas experienced this when moving in last year. “I didn’t have a mattress topper for my bed at first. After a few weeks of sleeping on the dorm provided mattress, I quickly realized why everyone else had mattress toppers and then went and got one for myself,” Thomas said.

Things like trash cans, paper towels, power strips, and dishes are items typically taken for granted, but nonetheless important, especially in a dorm setting where students will spend a lot of their time.

Thomas also said, “One of the most critical things to keep in your dorm is snacks. When everything else on campus is closer and you just need something to get you by, having some snacks on hand in your dorm is a life saver!”

Finally, bring cozy, homey items like rugs, extra pillows, and wall decorations. Dorms are only equipped with the bare necessities, but transforming the room with a few decorative items are sure to turn any dorm into a cozy living space for the year.

These items, while not as functional as the other things mentioned here, are what will make dorm life much more comfortable and satisfactory to take the edge off living in a new location by making it feel more like home.

File photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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Heads up incoming freshman, here’s some advice to survive college Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Blake Wedding —

As orientation draws near, The Cardinal has decided to put together a list for incoming students comprised of helpful hints and suggestions on how to survive and prosper in college.

Attend any and all events 

The first tip that some incoming students may forget the importance of is to take advantage of any and all university events specifically catered to incoming students. These events will not only help students de-stress and get their minds off of studying for a while, but they are also excellent opportunities to meet people, make friends and find groups of like-minded people on campus.

Go to class

This is more of an obvious tip, but it cannot be understated: go to class. There are plenty of upperclassmen and older students at the University of Louisville who have been incredibly successful in their classes over the years because they understand this idea. While it is perfectly okay to miss classes for understandable reasons, one thing to avoid is the pitfall of making a habit out of missing classes.

Make an effort to participate in class as much as possible

One of the biggest issues many students face is that they fail to understand the importance in actively participating in class. Students should try to ask as many questions as possible and to interact with their professors both inside and out of class. This means that by being a more active and engaged student, professors and instructors will notice your initiative and discipline. This is one of the best steps you can take in making your learning in college more positive and fulfilling.

Study 

While it goes without saying that studying is imperative to prospering in college, another equally important thing to keep in mind is to find a proper place to study. A proper study space is all about finding a place where students can decompress, relax and focus foremost on what requires their attention. The library is a great place for many people at U of L to study, but some people tend to prefer local coffee shops around Louisville. It is all about personal preference at the end of the day. 

Make sure to prioritize sleep

Many people have made the mistake of losing sleep in favor of socializing or studying more than their mind and body can take. It might be easy to find yourself losing sleep, but it is something that their body and mind require in order to truly prosper in your classes. 

Graphic by// The Louisville Cardinal

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Don’t forget to pack the essentials while traversing campus Saturday, Apr 25 2020 

By Grace Welsh–

Whether commuting or walking from a dorm, backpacks are a fundamental part of students’ daily lives. When spending a day on campus, it’s important to be prepared and keep your bag stocked full of essentials.

To some students, keeping a handy snack on deck is the key to a happy day. Freshman Jordan Reed says, “I always keep a pack of gushers in my backpack in case I get hungry during the day. Gushers are my favorite snack.”

Sophomore Madhav Gampala brings a Cliff bar in his backpack everywhere he goes. “Cliff bars are the perfect snack. They fill you up and give you energy. They don’t take up too much space either,” he says.

Keeping a reusable water bottle on you is an easy way to make sure you’re staying hydrated and saving the planet.

“There are water fountains nearly everywhere on campus and I take pride in being from a city like Louisville with such safe/drinkable water,” says junior Maggie Walters. “Plus you save money and help the environment out. It’s a win-win!”

Other students emphasize the importance of technology. Freshman Peter Hubbart always carries a charger. “I always keep my charger with me because I sometimes forget to charge my laptop the night before and I tend to stay on campus for a while at a time,” Hubbart says. 

Sophomore Alexis Bischoff and freshman Abby Savage can’t leave in the morning without grabbing their headphones. “The days I forget my headphones really stink,” Bischoff says.

“I feel like I can’t think straight when I can’t listen to music,” Savage agrees. “Walking around campus without my headphones feels weird.”

Freshman Victoria Hassel has a more practical view on what’s essential to her school day.

“I always need to make sure I have at least one pencil,” Hassel says. “The first day of classes I somehow forgot one. Think about how embarrassing it is to ask the person beside you to borrow a pencil on syllabus day.”

Similarly, freshman Ignatius Wirasakti makes sure to keep his binder, lined papers, and a campus map. “I keep the map just in case there’s a specific place I need to go to that I’m unfamiliar with,” he says. 

Freshman Marc Ramsignh also uses his backpack to hold practical items like his calendar book. “It helps me keep me organized so I don’t miss any important meetings or deadlines,” Ramsignh said. 

Graphic photo// The Louisville Cardinal

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‘We wanted to make a prom, and that’s what we did’ | Texas parents make prom night special for high school seniors Saturday, Apr 25 2020 

The time-honored tradition looks very different these days. But parents are proving even coronavirus can’t crash this party.

        

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