Black Lives Lost Transcend In New Play, ‘To Manifest The Ancestral Dream’ Friday, Oct 9 2020 

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Author and scholar Estella Conwill Majozo started writing her play shortly after racial justice protests began in Louisville in late May. 

“Were moving with the protesters, and this is an effort to offer a respite, to come in from the storm.”


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West End Magazine From 1970s Gets New Life In Revived Black Scene Millennium Wednesday, Oct 7 2020 

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Historical context is important to journalist Michael Jones, but he’s often found it lacking at Louisville media outlets. 

“The problem with the media is theres no institutional memory,” he said as someone who’s been a member of the “mainstream media.”


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Review: Louisville Orchestra Opens Virtual Season With Well-Produced, Thoughtful Concert Sunday, Oct 4 2020 

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Performing groups have been slowly and carefully re-entering the concert waters, dipping their toes in what feels like a pool that could be either scalding hot or arctic cold. For orchestras, a socially-distanced, virtual concert (with fewer players) seems to be the safe alternative to filling 1,000 seats in a hall.

The Louisville Orchestra is giving it a try with a virtual season of four concerts, cutely titled “LOVE” (Louisville Orchestra Virtual Edition). The first show played live on screens around the world on Saturday night. 

The live feed cut out early on, interrupting Devóne Tines singing “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” but once things seemed to get back on track, Teddy Abrams conducted the strings in Jessie Montgomery’s Starburst (2012), a short, exciting opener commissioned by the Sphinx Organization. 


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Tribute To Breonna Taylor Opens Louisville Orchestra Virtual Fall Season Saturday, Oct 3 2020 

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Bass-baritone Davóne Tines said the music and lyrics for the composition “Vigil” came to him in the wee hours of the morning, during an improv session with a close friend of his.

“My friend just started playing this very simple progression, and I started to sing over it,” Tines said. “And what happened was kind of unique in that the song came out fully formed in the first try.”


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Louisville Playwright Chosen For New Festival Exploring Race And Politics Wednesday, Sep 30 2020 

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Louisville artist Cris Eli Blak, “writer for the page, stage and screen,” said he learned about Regina Taylor’s new theater festival via a social media post. 

“I don’t have an agent, don’t have a manager or any kind of that showbiz stuff,” Blak said. “I get my opportunities from going online and just going on the hunt and being in way too many Facebook groups.”

He saw someone post about the opportunity to submit a short play in consideration for “Regina Taylors VOTE!,” presented by The Oaks Collective, and decided to give it a try. He wrote a play, titled “For Liberty, For Justice, For All,” and submitted it. Then, about two weeks ago, he received a phone call from a number he didn’t recognize.


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King Louis Statue’s Fate Remains TBD, While City Looks Forward On Public Art Monday, Sep 21 2020 

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The statue of King Louis XVI that once towered over passers by outside Metro Hall is now in storage, awaiting conservators to look it over.

“Theres no other plans in place right now except getting a thorough understanding of its condition,” said Louisville public art administrator Sarah Lindgren.

It’s been several weeks since the city quietly removed the statue of the former French ruler.


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All The Internet’s A Stage: Here Are The Louisville Arts & Culture Groups Offering Online Shows, Seasons Friday, Sep 18 2020 

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WFPL will continue to update this story.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many arts and cultural institutions have moved much, if not all, of their programming online. Some offerings are free, others require virtual tickets. 

Here’s a list of what you can watch from your living room. 


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Director of New Albany’s Carnegie Center For Art And History To Leave Thursday, Sep 17 2020 

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The Carnegie Center for Art and History in New Albany will soon have a vacancy at the top. 

Eileen Yanoviak confirmed her departure in a Facebook post Thursday, linking to a News and Tribune story that reported the news of her leaving the previous day. 

In her post, Yanoviak, who will step down at the end of the month, wrote that she’s “so very sad to leave, but also excited to start my next adventure.”


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#Breewayy Banners Go Up Around Jefferson Square Park Tuesday, Sep 15 2020 

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Seventeen #Breewayy banners were installed around Jefferson Square Park Monday

Community organizer Nicole Hayden said she had initially hoped to work with more than a dozen muralists to paint a “Black Lives Matter” mural on 6th and Jefferson streets. 

“The mission was to create a space for collective healing for the city of Louisville, and then basically a collaborative effort from the community organizers and protesters and local artists to come together to create art with a purpose,” Hayden said. 


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Kentucky Music Educators Try To Make In-Person Rehearsal Work, Even In A Pandemic Friday, Sep 11 2020 

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Members of the Oldham County High School (OCHS) marching band were spread across the school parking lot one hot August afternoon, using the painted parking space lines to make sure they stayed six feet apart. Oldham County schools are operating virtually for now. But after-school extracurricular activities like sports and marching band can still take place in person under certain guidelines.

Masks dangled from music stands while students played through their warm-up. The bells of all the brass instruments were covered in black fabric to keep potential COVID-19-carrying water droplets from floating across the parking lot along with their B-flat arpeggios.


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