Cardinals’ basketball wins national championship in virtual simulation Thursday, Apr 23 2020 

By John McCarthy —

With live sports have been suspended during the coronavirus pandemic, there has been an emergence of esports. These simulated games help fill the void of traditional sports leagues now on hiatus.

ESPN took advantage of the opportunity and aired 12 hours of esports which included a Madden NFL20 tournament, a F1 Virtual Grand Prix, the Rocket League World Championship and an NBA 2K players tournament. Along with these events, Madden has also run a Greatest of All-Time tournament featuring the best players from every team. The tournaments utilize advanced algorithms to run the simulations.

One Twitter user, @2020NCAASim2020,  used a similar method to run a simulation on the 2020 March Madness Tournament, and the University of Louisville came out on top to win the virtual National Championship on April 6.

The bracket was based on the final projections from ESPN’s Joe Lunardi. The twitter handle, who is not associated with the NCAA, said “the use of advanced statistical algorithms” helped create the simulation.

In any case, it’s not a real tournament, but with March Madness canceled, this was the closest we could get to the real thing. Louisville won as a virtual No. 4 seed against the virtual No. 1 seed Kansas Jayhawks 74-69 for the virtual national title.

Virtual junior Jordan Nwora led the way with 17 points, virtual freshman David Johnson scored 11 points and virtual senior Dwayne Sutton added 10 points and six rebounds in the fictitious victory.

Shively Sporting Goods is selling a t-shirts in celebration of the victory.

Graphic by ??? // The Louisville Cardinal

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There’s plenty of ways to get involved in campus life Wednesday, Apr 22 2020 

By Zoe Watkins — 

Even after Orientation and Welcome Week, the campus stays vibrant as ever almost every single day. There is no rest to campus life as there are many different things that a student can do to get involved with campus life and take part in the fun.

There’s plenty of social organizations for everyone’s interest

U of L offers many ways for students to be more social from Greek life to Recognized Student Organizations (RSO).

Even though she didn’t like the idea of joining a sorority at first, Junior Akanksha Gupta joined Kappa Delta (KD)after some her older friends pushed her to go through recruitment.

“Looking back, it was definitely the best decision I’ve made in college. I met so many of my best friends and have made connections that I never could’ve made before,” Gupta said.

She said a freshman should join a sorority or fraternity as it helps make them become a better person. KD shaped her into the person she is today as well as helped her grow. Gupta also said she gained life-long friends that have helped her make it through college.

If someone wishes to join a sorority or fraternity, Gupta said registration opens up on May 1.

Besides Greek life, the variety of RSOs offers students a chance to find new interests. Besides new interests, it is also a way to find people who share the same likes which was the case for junior Nicole Anderson when she joined the Tabletop Gaming Club for D&D.

Anderson says joining an RSO is a healthy way to fill downtime.

“You get to relax, share passions, make friends, and you get to learn about new stuff related to your passion,” she said.

Have a voice in our campus government

Make some change to campus through the Student Government Association (SGA), or even bring voice to a specific college since each branch of SGA has their own student council as well freshman council.

Sophomore Alexa Meza joined the Arts & Science Student council her freshman year as she needed a place where she could be herself and do the things that she loved.

“Through SGA, I’ve found some of my best friends and discovered the thing I’m really passionate about improving on campus,” Meza said.

She says what she loves the most about U of L’s student government is how it empowers students to improve areas in campus services or academic polices, solve problems, voice concerns and make change happen.

“The purpose of student government here at U of L, to me, is about improving the quality of life for students that are already here and making sure we give them the opportunity, the resources, and the desire to come back each year until they graduate,” she said.

Give back to the cardinal family

If the two options above aren’t interesting, there is still lots of ways to get involved with campus life especially with volunteering. This part of campus is heavily integrated into the cardinal community as there are plenty of days of service and even the Engage Lead Serve Board (ELSB) which offers service opportunities.

According louisville.edu, some things that students can do to volunteer is do a day of service such as MLK Day of Service, be a classroom note taker to help students with disabilities, become a Resident Assistant (RA) for campus housing or apply to be a Campus Tour Guide.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Graphic design student combines both art and social impact in her work Monday, Mar 30 2020 

By Zoe Watkins —

For Virtual Portfolio Preview Day, a senior graphic design major shared some of her work and reflected on her journey.

Though she is from Louisville, Taylor Simone first began her college career at Arizona State University before transferring to University of Louisville. Her time at ASU was what first started her interest in graphic design.

“ASU is where I gained my love for visual communication, although I was studying film at the time,” she said. “In my first semester attending U of L, I took an intro class to graphic design and immediately switched my major.”

Simone said the reason she loves graphic design is because it combines both of her two passions, art and social impact.

“I love graphic design because I can address topics like racial injustice and be creative while doing it,” She said.

Even if her designing process varies on each of her pieces, Simone states that she loves the research aspect.

“Having a strong understanding of the content is always the first step in my design process,” Simone said.

When finding inspiration for her pieces, Simone looks in a lot of different place, but is mostly inspired by real stories and experiences.

“I am intrigued by how a design can speak to a certain emotion or an experience that we all go through. I am heavily inspired by designs that bring people together in hopes of creating dialogue and discourse.

She said that her favorite piece in her portfolio is a book called “When Words Unravel.” The book goes over the historical and cultural analysis of the n-word. Simone designed and wrote the book during her third year in a Bookforms class at U of L.

“This book is my favorite piece because it captures so many of my interests in one project. I also learned so much since I got to interview different people about their experience with this word and its history,” she said.

When asked for advice for students who are also in graphic design or considering in majoring, Simone said to take their time to absorb as much as they can.

“As a design student, you don’t need to focus in one area. Learning as much as you can about all kinds of design methods and processes is the most rewarding part about studying graphic design.” Simone states.

Photo courtesy by Alexis Simone // The Louisville Cardinal

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Despite not being able to meet, RSOs are still finding ways to engage Thursday, Mar 26 2020 

By Victoria Doll —

All on-campus events and activities have been cancelled until further notice due to the spread of COVID-19. According to the University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi, online instruction is extended to the end of the semester and so are final exams; therefore, all campus events are suspended as well. 

In her latest email, Bendapudi said, “Events hosted by any University of Louisville entity or at any University of Louisville facility are to be postponed or cancelled through at least April 28th.” 

Even though there are no in-person meeting times for U of L’s clubs, there are still ways to participate and stay engaged. According to Julia Onnembo, University of Louisville’s assistant director of student involvement, a great way to stay engaged is to use the Engage website to cast your vote to elect your RSO Officers.

She said, “Engage has a great election program that you can use to run a virtual ballot in your individual portals.”  

Another way that campus RSOs are staying engaged is through group chats. A lot of clubs are maintaining communication through the app GroupMe or other mass messaging apps. 

To keep business flowing as normal as possible, some clubs use the platform Zoom to host online meetings and hold elections. For example, The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS) club on campus continues to host meetings through Zoom to discuss basic club information and how to move forward. 

NSCS’s President Ashley Ward, said, “These unprecedented times call for leaders who can adapt to abrupt changes. As a student leader of an RSO, my fellow officers and I have agreed to continue to offer open communication.” 

She continued to say that she encourages all RSOs to adjust as best as possible. “Student leaders need to adjust to online meetings, emails, social media and independent activities. Our primary purpose right now is to be an outlet for questions and concerns. Since we have quickly learned to adapt to an online campus, I know that we can face future challenges.”

Ashley has hope that even though these times are challenging, next semester the NSCS club and the community of U of L will be closer as a community. 

Overall, there isn’t much that anyone can do besides focus on classes and help the cause by staying inside and following other CDC guidelines.

Bendapudi concluded her email with some thoughtful advice and words of encouragement. “Despite all the busy-ness, I hope you will take a moment to pause.  Slow down.  Anchor yourself in what matters most to you. Together we will persevere through this tumultuous time and come out the other side a stronger, more unified university community.” 

File photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Stay or leave? Students are being left up with that decision Friday, Mar 20 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many businesses and other public places are shutting down for safety and health reasons. This includes colleges as well, meaning the University of Louisville is partially closing their doors to students and adapting to help protect students from the virus.

Because of these new changes, many students are left with the decision of either staying on campus to finish out the rest of the semester or traveling back home to complete coursework there.

Among the students who have left campus, sophomore Roni Wolfe is choosing to stay at her house to help reduce the stress.

“I don’t have to leave my room to eat or get anything if I’m home. I have all of that stuff and I’m with my family,” Wolfe said.

She said that because of the decision to switch to online classes and still not knowing what to do until a professor emails with direction, she is a little stressed out and worried. However, she is glad she is home and that everyone is trying not to navigate onto campus where there is a chance of spreading the virus.

In the meantime, Wolfe is spending time with her family while also preparing for online classes.

“I’m mostly just making a list of what my professors want us to do and when so I can keep track and not have to spend all of my free time stressing about it if I forgot something,” she said.

However, there are still students who want to stay on campus in Louisville.

Even though senior Emily Yadon has seen many people packing up and leaving for the rest of the spring semester, she must stay along with the few people who are still on campus.

“Luckily, dining is open, so food is somewhat available at limited hours,” Yadon said. “I’m hoping they won’t close with restaurants being forced to close. If so, I will need to go home since I won’t have a good place to cook and have limited access to food.”

She said it is important to keep practicing isolation and social distancing even if its draining and not enjoyable. Yadon said it is to protect others especially the older generations and people who have underlying health conditions.

Even if it’s not fun having to be inside all day long, there are still many ways to pass the time.

“I’ve been spending time playing board games with a few of friends who are also on campus. That’s pretty entertaining and enjoyable and it doesn’t involve going out where there’s a lot of people,” Yadon said.

However, due to recent changes sent out to students by email, many will have to move out by March 29 unless they sign up to stay on campus.

If the plan is to move out of the dorms, remember to fill out the cancellation form on the housing portal and to fill out the express checkout form and turn them in along with the dorm’s key when leaving for the rest of the semester.

However, if a student is choosing to stay, remember to let housing know you will be staying by signing into the housing portal and requesting to stay on campus by March 27th.

File photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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Students share their culture’s traditions at the Festival of Languages Tuesday, Mar 17 2020 

By Alex Tompkins —

The University of Louisville hosted the “Festival of Languages: Cultures around the World” event in the Red Barn March 4. The festival is way for students to learn the importance of different cultures around the world. 

Upon entry, the event was already a massive scene: parades of students and faculty, flying paper fish and the aroma of amazing dishes from around the world. The event hosted culturally specific acts on stage such as belly dancing, interactive Tai Chi, Chinese yo-yo and a live band performing Latin American music. 

Multiple booths were set up to represent different cultures and provide facts and fun activities relating to the cultures showcased. There were even pastries and dishes being handed out from each booth to give students a taste of different foods. 

Among the booths were Latin America, Germany and China. Each booth was accompanied by eager student volunteers that were knowledgeable about their booth’s culture.

Germany’s booth was set up much like the others; a tri-fold with facts and a table with treats specific to the culture. Students were taught a German greeting, and upon learning the response, they were rewarded with their choice of treats to choose from, including sweet tea, ginger cookies and chocolate cake.

It was obvious that each student was invested and truly involved in learning the cultures of the booth they worked at or visited. Not only were some students learning about different cultures, but others were teaching them. 

Many wore traditional garb, including festival wear specific to the country’s annual holidays and events. 

Many students were fascinated and pleased with the other booths and the inclusivity the event had to offer. 

“I think the event was important in helping people to understand how language could allow different opportunities and ways to connect with others from different cultures,” said junior Sarah Coffman. “It brings awareness to all of the different languages spoken, even here on campus.”

Photo by Anthony Riley 

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Starbuck’s menu offers more than that meets the eye Monday, Mar 16 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

The Starbucks’s menu offers a variety of drinks that can cater to anyone’s taste. Though if someone is getting tired of that regular Vanilla Bean Crème, there are some secret items that customers can order to try out.

However, it’s technically not Starbuck’s official “secret menu”, but many people don’t realize how customizable their drink can be which makes up many of the items on the menu. And by the means of being customizable, according to starbuckssecretmenu.net, there are over 200 drink recipes that anyone can order.

The most knowledgeable about the menu itself comes from the people who makes the drinks themselves, the baristas.

Junior Amanda Schweinzger says that she likes to make the Red Velvet Frappe since it reminds her of her childhood.

“I like red velvet cake to begin with, so having that in a frappe just makes it easier,” she says. The Red Velvet Frappe is a Vanilla Bean Frappe with red velvet cake blended in along with raspberry syrup.

Even though these drinks aren’t official drinks, Schweizger says the more that people order these drinks, the more common they become.

“A lot of people get their recipes off Pinterest and there’s a lot of ‘how to order’,” She says.

There is still a lot more than the Red Velvet Frappe. While junior Max Valentines likes the Strawberry Cheesecake Frappuccino, senior Davie Adams enjoys the Mixed Berry Frappe. Adams explained that he enjoys customizing the drinks and how it makes the drink much better.

Some more popular and common secret drinks is the Purple drink, which is Passion Iced Tea mixed with soy milk, vanilla syrup with some blackberries on top. Another is Butterbeer Frappuccino that takes a Crème Frappuccino and three pumps of each caramel and toffee-nut syrup.

There are a lot of options to go about when trying to plan for that creative Frappuccino, but keep in mind that the one who will be making the drink might not know how to make it.

As said before, none of these drinks are official, so when someone asks for a Fall-in-a-Cup Latte, the barista will have no clue what that means. So, when ordering one these secret drinks, start with the base and add on for what the recipe calls for.

Photo by Zoe Watkins//The Louisville Cardinal

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Girls run the world with annual International Women’s Day celebration Sunday, Mar 15 2020 

By Maria Dinh —

The Women’s Center, Women 4 Women Student Board and Student Activities Board hosted the 7th annual International Women’s Day celebration March 3 in Strickler Auditorium. 

The event had free food, including decorated heart-shaped cookies, in the lobby which also featured booths from the Americana Community Center and the Women’s Center.

Sidney Garner, president of the Women 4 Women Student Board, started the event by asking the audience which woman in their lives has greatly influenced them. She asked students in the audience, “What does International Women’s Day mean to you?” and “Who was the most influential woman in your life?”

A student answered his grandmother. “Growing up, she took care of me from when I was one to seven years old. I would go [to her house] after school. She immigrated over when my mom was seventeen years old. She’s a very strong woman. She has done all of this by herself without my grandpa.”

SAB Diversity Chairs Taleah Gipson and Sarika Polcum hosted the International Women’s Day performance portion. They started out by dedicating this event to every woman—mothers, sisters, aunts, trans women, women of color, disabled women, gender non-conforming women and all other women across the globe.

Students who attended also had a chance to win a free Women’s Center t-shirt during the intermission in a raffle.

Every performance that night featured women in the community. The first two performances were traditional Indian and Bollywood dances. The women in the Vietnamese Student Association performed a traditional hat dance. 

Gloria Fan, a member of VSA, said, “[The dance] is empowering representing not only women, but our culture.”

The Dazzling Cardettes performed a majorette dance with hip hop elements, and The Cardinal K-Pop Dance Team performed two dances to songs from Mamamoo and Chungha. 

To finish off the event, Flamenco Louisville gave a grand finale to this empowering event. 

As Women’s History Month continues, visit the Women’s Center at www.lousiville.edu/womenscenter for more information.

Photo by Maria Dinh // The Louisville Cardinal

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Save those last few flex points for something special Thursday, Mar 5 2020 

By Maria Dinh–

Sophomore Maria Dinh offers advice on how to use flex points

Students are approaching midterms season, otherwise known as “low flex season.”

Here are six ways to keep those last few remaining flex points.

Download the GET App

Having this app will make accessing and checking account balances much faster. It shows recent purchases and how many points are left on the account. The app also allows the options to refill flex points and Cardinal Cash through the website.

Evaluate Those Purchases

 Look at recent purchases and see where that extra $10 went to in one day. Maybe this could be a meal with a drink or Starbucks. If staying on campus four out of five days of the week is the reason, try bringing a lunch box.

If Starbucks has become an unhealthy habit, try downsizing that favorite drink from a venti to a grande.

Normalize Lunch Boxes

Lunch boxes aren’t just for PB & J sandwiches, leftovers to reheat on campus are another good option. There are a few microwaves around campus. The two public ones are at the commuter lounge on the second floor at the Student Activity Center and in the corner of the POD at the Belknap Academic Building.

Also bringing a personal water bottle will help save money on a fountain drink or bring a reusable coffee cup from home to save 10 cents on a drink.

Look Out for Discounts 

With Grubhub as the campus food pick up app, students receive emails with codes that can save $1 on the next order. Take advantage of that code and use it wisely.

Ask a Friend for a Meal Swipe

Some students do not use all of their meal swipes, so by the end of the semester, they are rushing to get rid of them. Ask if they can cover lunch one day, but first see if that is okay with them.

Only Spend on Lunch

It’s tempting to get a granola bar at the POD for breakfast, but there is an option to  get a pack of granola bars for less than one bar. Maybe have a banana in the morning before going to class.

With all that said, please do not go hungry to save flex points.

We all need to eat lunch even if we have to stop drinking Starbucks for a while and carry a lunchbox in our backpacks.

File Graphic// The Louisville Cardinal

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Women’s Center commemorates women in computing at 3rd annual watch party Sunday, Mar 1 2020 

By Madelynn Bland —

The University of Louisville Women Center’s “3rd Annual Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing Watch Party” celebrated women in the computer industry and highlighted their struggles and achievements Feb. 20.

The watch party streamed the Grace Hopper Celebration from 2019 and allowed attendees to network with successful women and learn about the computing field as a whole. 

There is currently a scholarship open for any woman with an interest in the field to attend this event. Last year, U of L student Alexus Maddox was a recipient of this scholarship. 

Many courageous women have worked to open the door for all women to be able to join this field, but there is still a great misrepresentation of women in the field.

Maddox said only 20 percent of the people in the computing field are women. However, she also shared that over 21,000 women attended Grace Hopper in 2019. She said that everywhere she went, there were lines spanning entire hallways full of women hoping to become more involved. 

The event spotlighted many empowered and successful women in computing whose speeches were showcased at the watch party on Thursday.

One of these women was Dr. Natalya Bailey, an aerospace engineer and the co-founder and CEO of Accion Systems. Bailey was the 2019 Emerging Technologist Abie Award Winner and the keynote speaker at last year’s event.

In her speech, she talked about how she has been discouraged by men in the computing field and even told to lower her voice to be taken seriously in computing. Despite this, she has raised over $25 million for her company. The Grace Hopper Celebration puts an emphasis on giving women like Bailey the recognition they deserve.  

Keturah Jenkins, the IT associate director of enterprise transformation at Humana, was the keynote speaker of this year’s watch party.

Prior to Humana, Jenkins spent 17 years at various jobs in the field and wants to tell newcomers to the computing that their journey will never be a straight path, and that’s okay.

“You need to find your passion. But be good at what you do, no matter what it is. Even if it’s just copying papers you never know where that could lead you,”  she said.

The 17 years of being passionate at various jobs led her to where she is now, and she’s proud of it. 

The event showcased how women are making room for other women in a field where they are under-represented. 

“Your journey may look different from someone else’s, but if you know what will make you happy then that’s all that really matters,” Jenkins said.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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