U of L bookstore changes how students get textbooks for the semester Monday, Aug 10 2020 

By Eli Hughes–

Any University of Louisville student looking to purchase their textbooks for the fall semester from the Campus Bookstore, will need to do so online due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Students will now be required to order textbooks online from the bookstore’s website and can choose to have their order shipped directly to their place of residence or to come into the bookstore for in-store pick-up.

The bookstore will be open from 9:00 am to 5:00 p.m. Customers will be able to shop in person for all items except for textbooks.

Andrea Herrera, the store’s manager, said the store will have several practices in place to help ensure the safety of customers and staff.

“There will be sanitation every two hours for common touch points,” Herrera said. “We will also quarantine returned items for 24 hours before putting them back in the store.” Bookstore staff must also have their temperature checked and answer a series of questions daily prior to starting their shift.

Masks will be required for store staff and customers and there will be a maximum of 68 customers allowed in the store at any given time. There will also be designated entry and exit points in order to promote social distancing in the store. 

Students can purchase textbooks online from the campus bookstore’s website by clicking the “Find your textbooks” tab. Any questions can be directed the campus bookstore at 502-852-6679 or books@louisville.edu.

File Photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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U of L campus bookstore closes to the public Monday, Mar 23 2020 

By Eli Hughes–

The University of Louisville bookstore will be closed to the public starting March 24 until further notice in line with Gov. Andy Beshear’s decision to close nonessential retail stores to combat the spread of COVID-19.

Staff will remain in the store to process online orders, but by March 30 only managers will be working in-store.

Andrea Herrera, store manager for the campus bookstore, said that it is unclear when the bookstore will reopen. “It depends on what the governor says,” Herrera said.

Students who need to return their rental textbooks will be able to do so by mail with free shipping. However, students who want to sell their textbooks back to the bookstore will not be able to do so through the mail.

Sarah Harvey, textbook manager, said that textbook buyback will depend on if the bookstore is able to open to the public at the end of the semester.

Harvey also said that the bookstore is doing its best to support the campus community at this time.

“We are here to help students and faculty during this very difficult time,” Harvey said. “We are all in this together.”

More information about ordering textbooks online and returning rental books can be found on the bookstore’s website.

Photo by Joseph Garcia // The Louisville Cardinal

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Uncertainty hangs over remaining campus students and resources Monday, Mar 23 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

The Cardinal’s Assistant Editor-in-Chief gives an update on campus life amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Uncertainty hangs over empty walkways and seas of upright chairs. Any other day, a look at an almost empty Ekstrom library and you’d think University of Louisville students were away celebrating some long awaited break.

A week before Spring Break, no one would have predicted U of L President Neeli Bendapudi would make the decision to move classes online until the end of the semester and postpone Spring Commencement.

As the world around us hastily comes to a halt, so does life on U of L’s campuses. While a majority of students are holed up in the apartments or with family preparing for online classes, a few still remain working in “essential” university services like dining or the Campus Store. However as more and more places shut their doors and students are moved out of campus housing, worry continues to grow.

Amber Hurst, a gap year student working at the Campus Bookstore, has been working at the store for five years.

“Things have definitely slowed down a lot, it’s kind of hard to keep being productive,” Hurst said. She said with the state things are in, she’s worried about job security.

Hurst had picked up another job but after working only two weeks, she was told her job would potentially close due to the virus.

“I needed some extra money,” Hurst said. “And now with the Bookstore’s status, I’m a little bit worried.”

Across campus, the Ekstrom Starbucks has noticed a similar drop in traffic. Senior shift manager Davy Adams said they are getting a fair amount of customers in a given hour.

“It depends on the day too,” they said.

Policy changes because of the virus are also evident across U of L’s campus. Restaurants have removed all dine-in seating encouraging customers to continue practicing social distancing. Cleaning has also had an overhaul.

“We have to wipe down all surfaces every 20 minutes. Anything that we are touching with our hands we have to wipe down,” Adams said. They wish though that face masks could be provided for extra precaution. “A few people that work for Campus Dining have them, but they bring them from home,” Adams said.

Adams admitted they don’t feel particularly safe being back, even despite the lack of students. This was a common sentiment among many of the remaining student workers.

“I’m here because I have to make money,” they said. “I don’t want to say that I’m petrified to work here, I feel like we’re doing the best we can do. But as a working class person, what are you gonna do? You gotta work, you gotta make money.”

Even with the closures, and students being told March 18 to leave campus housing, there were still some resources available for students.

Kathy Meyer, assistant director of student leadership, said the Cardinal Cupboard, U of L’s first food pantry, will remain open during the campus closure as long as the SAC remains open. The pantry can be found in room W314.

“In the event that the Cardinal Cupboard must close, we recommend those in need of food search the Dare to Care distribution webpage for a list of mobile pantries and stationary pantries,” Meyer said.

Meyer also suggested students finding themselves in financial emergencies during this time apply for the Louis and Louise W. Wisser Bornwasser Emergency Fund. The fund’s goal is to “assist University of Louisville students who encounter an unforeseen emergency or catastrophic event,” said the Dean of Student’s website.

Photo by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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