Attorney General Asks Judge To Deny Grand Juror’s Request To Speak Publicly Wednesday, Oct 7 2020 

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Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron asked a judge to deny a grand jurors request to break secrecy and speak publicly about the proceedings that led to the indictment of one former police officer in the Breonna Taylor case.

An anonymous juror asked a Jefferson County judge to order the release of transcripts and free jurors of their requirement not to speak about the case presented to them by the attorney generals office. In a motion filed Wednesday, Cameron asked the judge to dismiss the request, and said he and the Commonwealths Attorneys Association have grave concerns about ensuring the secrecy of these proceedings.

[A] request by a single member of a grand jury, or even the grand jury itself, cannot be permitted to overcome the important public interest of the Commonwealth in maintaining the proper functioning of the criminal justice system in general and the grand jury process in particular, Camerons motion said.


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Analysis: In Breonna Taylor Killing, Grand Jury Proceedings And Aftermath Are Unusual Monday, Oct 5 2020 

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The criminal grand jury process is shrouded in secrecy.

But even attorneys familiar with how the process works remain puzzled by the outcome and fallout from the case brought by Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, whose office investigated the killing of Breonna Taylor by Louisville Metro Police officers in March.

“A prosecutor leads the grand jury to whatever he needs them to be led to,” said Heather Crabbe, an attorney who served as a public defender for six years in Northern Kentucky. 


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Grand Jury Tapes Raise New Questions About No-Knock Warrant Execution Friday, Oct 2 2020 

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Last week, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron presented the results of his office’s investigation into the police killing of Breonna Taylor. In laying out the evidence they had gathered over months of investigating, he answered one of the most persistent questions about what happened that night: 

“Evidence shows that officers both knocked and announced their presence at the apartment,” Cameron said. “The officer’s statements about their announcement are corroborated by an independent witness who was near in a proximity to apartment four,” where Taylor lived.


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Brett Hankison Claimed He Knew Where ‘Threat Was’ When He Shot At Breonna Taylor’s Apartment Friday, Oct 2 2020 

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Former Louisville police detective Brett Hankison claimed in a March police interview that the shooter had an AR-15 rifle and he thought fellow officers were being executed during the deadly operation at Breonna Taylor’s apartment.


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Breonna Taylor Grand Jury Recordings: What We Know So Far Friday, Oct 2 2020 

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Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s office has made public more than 15 hours of audio recordings of grand jury proceedings related to the Breonna Taylor case.

The recordings offered little in the way of bombshells or answers to the biggest questions to follow the grand jurys indictment last week: did prosecutors recommended any charges beyond those the grand jury indicted on, and how did they summarized the case in statements to the grand jury?

Fifteen hours of tapes reviewed by WPFL reporters turned up few statements of any kind from prosecutors that would shed light on those questions. Only evidence was recorded, according to a press release from the Attorney Generals office announcing compliance with the order Friday.


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AG Cameron To Release Breonna Taylor Grand Jury Recordings Today Friday, Oct 2 2020 

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Attorney General Daniel Camerons office must make public more than 20 hours of audio recordings of grand jury proceedings related to the Breonna Taylor case by midday Friday.

A Jefferson County judge ordered the release as part of the criminal proceedings against former Louisville Metro Police detective Brett Hankison. Parties ranging from lawyers for Taylors family to politicians to concerned citizens have called for the public release of the recordings, as well as other evidence presented to the grand jury, since last week.

Thats when the grand jury indicted Hankison on wanton endangerment charges for bullets that entered an apartment of Taylors neighbors. No one was charged for her March 13 killing, a decision that has intensified national scrutiny of Louisville, the justice system and Cameron.


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Campus responds to Breonna Taylor charges Wednesday, Sep 23 2020 

By Joseph Garcia — 

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced a Jefferson County Grand Jury would charge only one officer, former LMPD detective Brett Hankison, with wanton endangerment in the case of Breonna Taylor’s murder.

University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi called the announcement “a reminder that we must recommit to pursuing racial justice and pushing for changes in law enforcement, our legal system, public policy and our educational curricula.”

Taylor was killed March 13 when three LMPD officers entered her home with a “no-knock” warrant. When the police came through the door, Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired a one round at police after asking who was there and receiving no response. The officers returned more than two dozen shots. Taylor’s death certificate says she was shot five times, however today, Cameron said she was actually struck six times.

Hankison is the only one of the three officers indicted. He is charged with three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for firing into neighbor’s apartments, not for the death of Taylor.

A wanton endangerment charge is a class D felony, it comes with a penalty of one to five years.

“While I am pleased that the grand jury has acknowledged the unlawful actions of this police officer and that he will be tried for the unnecessary violence he caused that night,” Bendapudi told students, faculty and staff.  “I am disappointed that our justice system allows these atrocities to occur all too often with relatively little consequence.”

Bendapudi said the attorney general’s announcement does not change the fact that Taylor was killed in her home.

“It does not fix a system that allowed that to happen,” she said, citing a Harvard study which found that Black people are three times more likely on average than white people to be killed during a police interaction.

U of L’s Student Government Association Top 4 said they too are disappointed that Taylor will “not receive the justice she so deserved.”

“For many of our students, waiting for this announcement has been an incredibly emotional time,” SGA said in a statement on social media. “These results will be very difficult to handle, especially for our Black students.”

The university is offering resources for students, faculty and staff to heal during this time.

Faculty and staff may use the Employee Assistance Program to receive counseling services. While U of L’s Counseling Center is offering virtual and personal counseling sessions for students, which SGA said is free to students as part of the $50 insurance fee billed at the start of the year.

“As long as you have not voided this fee on ULink, your visit to the Counseling Center will be covered,” they said.

Some professors have already begun listening to what their student’s are feeling and have canceled their classes.

“I want to respond to the needs of my students,” Siobhan Smith-Jones said after cancelling her 4 o’clock Mass Communications course.

Smith-Jones said she would have continued with class had the students wanted to, pushing down her own feelings of hurt.

“Because I am hurt, I know many of my students are too,” she said. “They are also confused, disappointed and disgusted. They want to protest or protect themselves and their families.”

“I’m here to help, not hinder,” Smith-Jones said.

She also added that the ramifications of this decision will impact Louisville, and therefore U of L, for years to come.

“Our students will have a hand in making the changes needed to our socio-political systems,” she said. “They have a perspective that no one else has; this is their city.”

“So in that,” she said. “Canceling class is a small thing.”

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Louisville Mayor Declares State Of Emergency Due To ‘Potential For Civil Unrest’ Tuesday, Sep 22 2020 

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Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency Tuesday pending an announcement by Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron regarding the Breonna Taylor case.

Cameron is expected to say publicly whether officers who shot and killed Taylor in her home on March 13 will face criminal charges. While the time and date of such an announcement are not known, the closure of federal buildings, downtown traffic restrictions and other measures indicate it may come soon.

Fischer said in a press release that he does not know when Cameron will address the issue.


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Kentucky AG Says No Announcement In Breonna Taylor Case This Week Sunday, Aug 30 2020 

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Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced on Sunday that his office now has the FBI ballistics report from the shooting death of Breonna Taylor.

Cameron referred to the new information as a “critical piece” of the investigation during an appearance on CBS’s Face the Nation, adding that more witness interviews still need to be conducted. Cameron said he will meet with FBI officials this week to review the report.

After the television interview, Cameron said on Twitter that his office doesn’t plan to announce any decisions on the case this week.


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Kentuckians Stump For Trump During Republican National Convention Tuesday, Aug 25 2020 

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Three Kentuckians spoke during the Republican National Convention on Tuesday including Attorney General Daniel Cameron, who praised President Donald Trump and criticized protests that have erupted around the country in recent months.

Cameron is the first Black person elected to statewide office in Kentucky and is currently investigating the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman and emergency room technician killed by Louisville police in March.

During his speech, Cameron criticized “the politics of identity, cancellation and mob rule.”


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