Go off the beaten path and take a trip to these uncommon spots at UofL Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Maria Dinh —

There common places on campus that most students like to hang out such as Ekstrom Library, the Student Activities Center and the Belknap Academic Building. Here are some uncommon spots on campus to check out when out for a walk.

Texas Roadhouse Study Lounge – College of Business

Located in the basement of the College of Business, there is a study room that is furnished just like a Texas Roadhouse restaurant. No, this room does not serve bread rolls, but inside has a vending machine with a hot water dispenser so you can make some instant coffee and tea while studying. This lounge isn’t a place for socializing and the noise level is under a whisper.

Dwight Anderson Memorial Music Library – School of Music

To the right of the main doors in the School of Music is a small library full of beautiful indoor plants and an antique piano. Freshman Katherine Boyce has her own favorite quirk about the music library.

She said, “Probably the people, if that counts. People there tend to have more fun and be a bit noisier than in the other libraries. It’s hard to go a single hour without hearing someone there burst into song or start making some sort of music. It makes the atmosphere livelier and more fun than a lot of other places.”

School of Music Stairs – School of Music

In the daytime, these steps look like ordinary steps. On campus at night, color changing lights shine on the steps. The colorful lights are a good opportunity for taking photos to post on Instagram.

Schneider Hall Art Gallery – Schneider Hall

The Speed Art Museum isn’t the only gallery on campus. The Schneider Hall Art Gallery features student artwork from the Hite Art Institute. This is a small exhibit to go and escape. Everyone is welcome to view the art and doors open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Hite Art Institute Fountains – Schneider Hall

The perfect spot to be at on campus when the weather is nice is the fountain at Schneider Hall. This place is perfect to sit back and relax between classes or chat with a friend. 

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

The post Go off the beaten path and take a trip to these uncommon spots at UofL appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Heads up incoming freshman, here’s some advice to survive college Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Blake Wedding —

As orientation draws near, The Cardinal has decided to put together a list for incoming students comprised of helpful hints and suggestions on how to survive and prosper in college.

Attend any and all events 

The first tip that some incoming students may forget the importance of is to take advantage of any and all university events specifically catered to incoming students. These events will not only help students de-stress and get their minds off of studying for a while, but they are also excellent opportunities to meet people, make friends and find groups of like-minded people on campus.

Go to class

This is more of an obvious tip, but it cannot be understated: go to class. There are plenty of upperclassmen and older students at the University of Louisville who have been incredibly successful in their classes over the years because they understand this idea. While it is perfectly okay to miss classes for understandable reasons, one thing to avoid is the pitfall of making a habit out of missing classes.

Make an effort to participate in class as much as possible

One of the biggest issues many students face is that they fail to understand the importance in actively participating in class. Students should try to ask as many questions as possible and to interact with their professors both inside and out of class. This means that by being a more active and engaged student, professors and instructors will notice your initiative and discipline. This is one of the best steps you can take in making your learning in college more positive and fulfilling.

Study 

While it goes without saying that studying is imperative to prospering in college, another equally important thing to keep in mind is to find a proper place to study. A proper study space is all about finding a place where students can decompress, relax and focus foremost on what requires their attention. The library is a great place for many people at U of L to study, but some people tend to prefer local coffee shops around Louisville. It is all about personal preference at the end of the day. 

Make sure to prioritize sleep

Many people have made the mistake of losing sleep in favor of socializing or studying more than their mind and body can take. It might be easy to find yourself losing sleep, but it is something that their body and mind require in order to truly prosper in your classes. 

Graphic by// The Louisville Cardinal

The post Heads up incoming freshman, here’s some advice to survive college appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Juniors reflect on what they would say to their freshman selves Saturday, Apr 25 2020 

By Aaliyah Bryant —

It is that time of the year where the semester is close to ending. Of course, we did not expect to wrap up the semester off campus with online classes due to the coronavirus.

However, students and staff are staying strong and persevering. Although we have our concerns, quarantine is giving students a chance to slow down and reflect.

One of the things for juniors and seniors to think about is advice to their freshman selves. University of Louisville juniors, Biology major Alex Mindrup and English major Becca Smith, decided to share their advice.

Mindrup said, most importantly, don’t be afraid to ask for help. He said, “Even if you are a fantastic student, we all need help from time to time.” He said to use the tutoring and student services that U of L has to offer, said that this will help make you a more confident student and relieve stress.

Secondly, it is ok to go home and leave campus regularly.

He said, “Don’t feel pressured to stay on campus all the time. College is a marathon, not a sprint and we all need time to rest and charge.”

Last but not least, get to know your professors. “Whether it is shaking their hand on the first day of class or emailing them after the semester is over, they are dedicated to helping us,” he said. 

As Mindrup continues his studies this fall, he will take his advice and wisdom with him.

Smith took a more emotional approach on her advice.

She would tell her freshman self, “Your failures are not the sum of who you are, but they are a part of who you will become and the choices you’re going to make.”

Smith said that she wishes that she would have known that sooner, but she would not have become the person she is today because of it. 

This advice could apply to everyone whether they are about to start their freshman year.

Graphic by//The Louisville Cardinal

The post Juniors reflect on what they would say to their freshman selves appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

There’s plenty of ways to get involved in campus life Wednesday, Apr 22 2020 

By Zoe Watkins — 

Even after Orientation and Welcome Week, the campus stays vibrant as ever almost every single day. There is no rest to campus life as there are many different things that a student can do to get involved with campus life and take part in the fun.

There’s plenty of social organizations for everyone’s interest

U of L offers many ways for students to be more social from Greek life to Recognized Student Organizations (RSO).

Even though she didn’t like the idea of joining a sorority at first, Junior Akanksha Gupta joined Kappa Delta (KD)after some her older friends pushed her to go through recruitment.

“Looking back, it was definitely the best decision I’ve made in college. I met so many of my best friends and have made connections that I never could’ve made before,” Gupta said.

She said a freshman should join a sorority or fraternity as it helps make them become a better person. KD shaped her into the person she is today as well as helped her grow. Gupta also said she gained life-long friends that have helped her make it through college.

If someone wishes to join a sorority or fraternity, Gupta said registration opens up on May 1.

Besides Greek life, the variety of RSOs offers students a chance to find new interests. Besides new interests, it is also a way to find people who share the same likes which was the case for junior Nicole Anderson when she joined the Tabletop Gaming Club for D&D.

Anderson says joining an RSO is a healthy way to fill downtime.

“You get to relax, share passions, make friends, and you get to learn about new stuff related to your passion,” she said.

Have a voice in our campus government

Make some change to campus through the Student Government Association (SGA), or even bring voice to a specific college since each branch of SGA has their own student council as well freshman council.

Sophomore Alexa Meza joined the Arts & Science Student council her freshman year as she needed a place where she could be herself and do the things that she loved.

“Through SGA, I’ve found some of my best friends and discovered the thing I’m really passionate about improving on campus,” Meza said.

She says what she loves the most about U of L’s student government is how it empowers students to improve areas in campus services or academic polices, solve problems, voice concerns and make change happen.

“The purpose of student government here at U of L, to me, is about improving the quality of life for students that are already here and making sure we give them the opportunity, the resources, and the desire to come back each year until they graduate,” she said.

Give back to the cardinal family

If the two options above aren’t interesting, there is still lots of ways to get involved with campus life especially with volunteering. This part of campus is heavily integrated into the cardinal community as there are plenty of days of service and even the Engage Lead Serve Board (ELSB) which offers service opportunities.

According louisville.edu, some things that students can do to volunteer is do a day of service such as MLK Day of Service, be a classroom note taker to help students with disabilities, become a Resident Assistant (RA) for campus housing or apply to be a Campus Tour Guide.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

The post There’s plenty of ways to get involved in campus life appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Vote for a better future, not the candidate Saturday, Apr 18 2020 

By Ben Goldberger —

Bernie Sanders brought the 2020 presidential election back to the forefront of Americans’ minds after he announced the termination of his presidential campaign April 8. This paves the way for the democratic nomination for Joe Biden and almost guarantees we will see a Biden versus Trump battle for the presidency.

Sanders spoke to many of the underlying issues in society today that affect a vast amount of people, and built a strong base of young, diverse supporters, especially college-age voters in the process. Many Democrats are devastated by his resignation, seeing their two choices return to the norm for American politics: old, rich, white men.

This disappointment is leading many of Sanders’ supporters to either vote third party in the presidential election or not vote at all. While this frustration with the current political system and democratic party is valid, voting third party or restraining from voting will only further the systematic struggles that Sanders’ fought so hard to combat. 

Let’s be honest, a third-party candidate will not win any election in the current political scene, especially the most important presidential election in recent history. The two-party dominant political system is not the best system by any means, and third parties allow for vaster representation in politics, but this is not the election to protest this system. 

While it is easy to look at the two major-party candidates for this election and find issues with them both, this election is about more than just the candidates. 

For starters, it is likely that at least one or two Supreme Court seats will open up within the next four years. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 87, a Supreme Court Justice known to lean democratic in her decisions, has faced multiple health complications throughout this year. Along with fellow Justice Stephen Breyer, also over 80 years old, are likely to resign in the next coming years.

This means that whatever party is in charge could change the balance of the Supreme Court for years to come. 

Another issue to consider is the rapidly decreasing health of our planet.

In October 2018, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report that said if the global temperature does not decrease by 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2040, the Earth will reach past the point of return, leading to a state of inhabitability.

The current administration has not made saving the environment a priority, enacting or removing laws in order to benefit businesses over sustainability.

The next administration to take office will set the tone for how this country acts towards environmental justice and will either start to make progress that will keep this planet livable or worsen the situation and decrease the time until Earth is no longer habitable. 

2040 may seem far away, but it is much closer than it feels. Children who started kindergarten last fall will be seniors in high school in 2032, only eight years until the point of no return.

This is an extremely pressing issue, and this election will decide the fate of the planet, and the fate of future generations.

Despite all of this, many supporters of past democratic candidates cannot bring themselves to vote for Biden, because they see the similarities between him and Trump. While voters should not condone his past behavior by any means, they also should not let the disappointing choices of candidates deter them from what this election is truly about. 

This election is not about one candidate or the other. It is about which party gets control over the Supreme Court for upwards of 25 years to come, altering decisions like reproductive justice, LGBTQIA+ equality, transgender rights and racial justice to name a few.

It is about making a larger effort to save the environment before it is too late. It is about making a greater life for the upcoming generations.

Even if neither of the two dominant candidates represents voters’ beliefs entirely, people should vote for the candidate who will pass the most policies that they agree with.

Biden is definitely a step back into traditional politics, but if Sanders supporters want even a speck of what Bernie stood for to become a reality in the next four years, they should put their personal pride aside and vote for the democratic candidate. 

Baby steps will still move us forward. 

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

The post Vote for a better future, not the candidate appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Shop Impromptu still providing service even with doors closed Friday, Mar 20 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

Though many stores are closing until the coronavirus pandemic has settled, there are some who have found ways to keep open.

Shop Impromptu is owned and run by University of Louiville alumnus Jordan Mannel. The boutique store sells women’s clothing, shoes, accessories and home decorations.

Mannel said she began her business in 2016 by starting it as an online boutique in her living room. She mostly relied on online ads the first year, but her business quickly took off.

“As it grew, I expanded into a 550 square feet showroom in Butchertown to get it out of my home. We quickly got there and moved into the mall in October of 2018. We occupied 1100 square feet and I gained a staff of about 6 people. In July 2019, we moved into a 6000 square feet store in Oxmoor across from Apple & Sephora,” Mannel said.

In the beginning, Mannel’s inventory primarily consisted of derby fashion which she said is how she got started.

“Everyone wanted me to dress them for Derby. My mom makes all the hats and fascinators, and I sell more in Derby season than in Christmas season,” Mannel said.

Even though Shop Impromptu had to close for the time being, Mannel said it was the right decision.

“I feel I did the right thing by closing my door early Saturday to ensure we take precautions of not spreading COVID-19. People were not staying inside, and I did not want to be the one to give them a place to go,” she said.

Since Shop Impromptu sells more derby fashion than anything else, she said it will be a hard time.

“I currently have a staff of 12 and with all the current events, doing my best to make sure what I’ve created stays afloat,” she said.

But there’s still hope for stores to keep going and make money even with their storefront closed. Such as with Shop Impromptu, there is an online store and a Facebook page where customers can still order products which Mannel said can go a long way.

“Buy online if it something they are something, purchase gift cards, share their posts and comment on their posts. All of these simple things can help,” she said.

Even though everything may seem rough right now, and there is still a lot of uncertainty, there is still some advice that can be shared.

“It’s going to be okay, we are all in this together. And lucky for us, most of your derby dresses will still be in season for the beginning of September,” Mannel said.

Photo courtesy by Jordan Mannel

The post Shop Impromptu still providing service even with doors closed appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

U of L adds pass/fail option for the spring 2020 semester Friday, Mar 20 2020 

By Eli Hughes–

University of Louisville Provost Beth Boehm announced in an email to students March 20 that students now have the option to make any of their classes for the spring 2020 semester pass/fail.

A pass/fail system means that no matter the letter grade, a class that a student passes will not affect their grade point average but will be counted toward their degree progression. A failed class will affect their grade point average.

Undergraduate students who choose this option will earn a grade of “pass” for any class they get a D- or better in and a “fail” grade for any class they get an F in. Graduate students will earn a “pass” for any class they get a C- or better in and a “fail” for any class they get a D+ or below in.

Boehm explained the decision to offer a pass/fail class as a way to redefine what success means in a time where things are uncertain due to the spread of COVID-19.

“Success might mean something different this semester than it would in a ‘normal’ semester: it might mean not giving up when you are tempted to; it might mean finishing all of the courses you signed up for without stressing about grades; it might mean practicing social distancing to keep yourself and others safe and healthy; it might mean finding out that you are stronger than you thought,” Boehm said.

This decision came after students raised concerns about the switch to online classes for the remainder of the semester. One student, Chidum Okeke, started an online petition to persuade U of L administration to provide a pass/fail option.

That petition had 3,751 signatures at the time the decision was made. In his petition, Okeke explained why he felt a pass/fail system would be beneficial. “U of L students are driven and passionate, but under these circumstances, the amount of work and engagement can be exhausting and potentially detrimental to the success of our student body,” Okeke said.

“Giving students the option to make their classes pass/fail wouldn’t discourage students from doing well academically, but rather, would allow some cushion for those in tough situations.”

Boehm suggested that students talk to their advisors before deciding to switch to pass/fail or not. The decision can be made on a class by class basis and the deadline to switch a class to pass/fail is April 21, the last day of class.

Boehm attached the university’s official pass/fail policy to the email and said it will also be put on the U of L coronavirus website.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

The post U of L adds pass/fail option for the spring 2020 semester appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Stay or leave? Students are being left up with that decision Friday, Mar 20 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many businesses and other public places are shutting down for safety and health reasons. This includes colleges as well, meaning the University of Louisville is partially closing their doors to students and adapting to help protect students from the virus.

Because of these new changes, many students are left with the decision of either staying on campus to finish out the rest of the semester or traveling back home to complete coursework there.

Among the students who have left campus, sophomore Roni Wolfe is choosing to stay at her house to help reduce the stress.

“I don’t have to leave my room to eat or get anything if I’m home. I have all of that stuff and I’m with my family,” Wolfe said.

She said that because of the decision to switch to online classes and still not knowing what to do until a professor emails with direction, she is a little stressed out and worried. However, she is glad she is home and that everyone is trying not to navigate onto campus where there is a chance of spreading the virus.

In the meantime, Wolfe is spending time with her family while also preparing for online classes.

“I’m mostly just making a list of what my professors want us to do and when so I can keep track and not have to spend all of my free time stressing about it if I forgot something,” she said.

However, there are still students who want to stay on campus in Louisville.

Even though senior Emily Yadon has seen many people packing up and leaving for the rest of the spring semester, she must stay along with the few people who are still on campus.

“Luckily, dining is open, so food is somewhat available at limited hours,” Yadon said. “I’m hoping they won’t close with restaurants being forced to close. If so, I will need to go home since I won’t have a good place to cook and have limited access to food.”

She said it is important to keep practicing isolation and social distancing even if its draining and not enjoyable. Yadon said it is to protect others especially the older generations and people who have underlying health conditions.

Even if it’s not fun having to be inside all day long, there are still many ways to pass the time.

“I’ve been spending time playing board games with a few of friends who are also on campus. That’s pretty entertaining and enjoyable and it doesn’t involve going out where there’s a lot of people,” Yadon said.

However, due to recent changes sent out to students by email, many will have to move out by March 29 unless they sign up to stay on campus.

If the plan is to move out of the dorms, remember to fill out the cancellation form on the housing portal and to fill out the express checkout form and turn them in along with the dorm’s key when leaving for the rest of the semester.

However, if a student is choosing to stay, remember to let housing know you will be staying by signing into the housing portal and requesting to stay on campus by March 27th.

File photo//The Louisville Cardinal

The post Stay or leave? Students are being left up with that decision appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Louisville rugby heads for playoffs Wednesday, Nov 6 2019 

By Gabriel Wiest —

With momentum going into the off season, men’s club rugby will face off in the Mid-Atlantic Conference Playoffs starting Nov. 9. Louisville enters the tournament seeded No. 2 and will match up against No. 3 Bowling Green State University.

The Cardinals (6-2) will enter the tournament ranked No. 13 nationally while facing stiff conference competition. Out of eight teams in their conference, four are ranked.

Louisville’s first matchup of the tournament style playoffs will be against defending national champion BGSU. Louisville enters the game at full strength as head coach Emil Walton made an impact and turned the team into a national competitor in three years.

The Cardinals entered the playoffs as back-to-back MAC South Champions in 2017 and 2018. Louisville has strong players who will help solidify wins in the off season. Sophomore Issac Bales, junior Terran Meek and sophomore Sipi Save ranked top 10 in the nation for their positions.

Meek leads the conference as the top try-scorer with 12 tries and 60 points. This is followed by senior Kameron Glandey with six tries and 36 points this season.

Seniors Tommy Luc and Gladney will be team captains heading into the tournament. Senior Cameron Bernard leads the team with 17 penalty kicks.

The men’s only losses of the season were in away games. The Cardinals will need to hit the field with confidence in order to take down BGSU.

The Cardinals played BGSU as an underdog over the regular season. Louisville upset BGSU 27-18, boosting the Cardinals national rank from No. 21 to almost top 10. This win secured Louisville’s dominance on their home field and was their last home game of the regular season.

Other competitors in the tournament include the likes of Western Michigan University and Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis. If Louisville defeats BGSU, the Cardinals could face one of these two teams. The top preforming teams from the MAC playoffs will have spots in the National Championships.

“WMU is a very strong team but if the Cardinals play like they did the past weekend, it should make for a very exciting weekend.” said Walton.

Photo Courtesy Cardinal Rugby / The Louisville Cardinal

The post Louisville rugby heads for playoffs appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.