U of L responds to NCAA notice of allegations Tuesday, Sep 22 2020 

By John McCarthy–

The University of Louisville released a statement in response to the NCAA notice of allegations Sept. 21. U of L is facing serious NCAA violations, especially since the Cardinals are repeat offenders.

U of L’s response on Sept. 21 argues that the NCAA’s allegations against the university “arise out of a criminal conspiracy to defraud the University of Louisville,” said the statement.

The FBI found, during an investigation of U of L, that representatives of Adidas had conspired to pay Brian Bowen, a highly touted recruit. Adidas agreed to pay Bowen $100,000 to play for the Cardinals and sign with the shoe company upon going to the NBA. These allegations resulted in the firing of men’s basketball head coach Rick Pitino and athletic director Tom Jurich back in 2017.

The essence of the Cardinals’ statement explains that Adidas attempted to defraud U of L with the deal offered to Brian Bowen and his family. Louisville’s response states that Adidas cannot both be acting in U of L’s best interest while plotting to offer a recruit compensation, resulting in the degradation of the university.

The 75-page response comes after U of L requested a 45-day extension to thoroughly finish their response. Louisville currently awaits a response from the NCAA.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Louisville basketball holds breath amidst possible allegations Saturday, Jun 15 2019 

By Gabriel Wiest–

According to NCAA official Stan Wilcox, Level I violations will be placed on six men’s basketball programs by the end of summer. Louisville could be clipped by the violations as the program was involved in the 2017 pay-to-play scandal investigated by the FBI.

Wilcox said the notice of allegations will be sent to the programs in the coming weeks. Notice of allegations are sent after the NCAA has finish their investigation.

Under NCAA bylaw 10.1 misconduct is defined by, “receipt of benefits by an institutional staff member for facilitating or arranging a meeting between a student athlete and an agent, financial advisor or representative of an agent or advisor.”

Level I violations are the most serious in the NCAA and the sanctions can include scholarship loss, returning earned money from the time period of the violations, probation and more. Louisville is all too familiar with Level I sanctions after their scandal with self-proclaimed escort Katina Powell which led to the removal of the 2013 national title.

The FBI led to the major turnover in the athletic department in which Louisville parted ways with long-time head coach Rick Pitino and athletic director Tom Jurich.

File Photo / The Louisville Cardinal

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