Students: What you need to know about voting in the 2020 election Wednesday, Sep 30 2020 

By Katie Volpentesta —

The 2020 Presidential election is just six weeks away, so it’s important to be educated on voting options as well as candidates and policies down the ballot.

While the COVID-19 pandemic complicates in-person voting options, the Jefferson County Board of Elections is doing everything they can to keep Jefferson County residents informed of their options, including registering to vote, requesting and sending in a mail-in ballot, and voting in person both early or on Election Day.

“In a normal election we have about 232 locations within 623 precincts, and now with coronavirus, a lot of things have changed,” said Jordan Kelch, public relations administrator at the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office. Typically, early or mail-in voting is only allowed if a voter meets one of ten special criteria that prevent you from being able to vote on Election Day.

Instead of smaller polling locations throughout the county, the board has created four election super centers that will allow for social distanced voting in large, open areas. Early voting will take place at the Kentucky Exposition Center, the YUM! Center, the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, and a fourth location in the east end that is yet to be announced.

Early in-person voting is from Oct. 13 to Nov. 2 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and voting on Election Day, Nov. 3, will be at the same locations from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

In order to vote either in person or via mail-in absentee ballot, residents of Jefferson County must be registered to vote. Luckily, this process is available and easily accessible online. The last day to register to vote in Kentucky is Oct. 5 at 4 p.m.

Additionally, the deadline to order a mail-in ballot in Kentucky is Oct. 9 by 11:59 p.m. These resources, as well as information on polling places, candidates and issues on your ballot, are available on the Jefferson County Clerk’s elections site.

“There’s 1,200 ballot styles for this election. Jefferson County is really large, so there’s lots of different areas with small city races,” Kelch said. “It all comes down to your legislative district and the neighborhood you live in.” The Jefferson County Clerk’s site can show you your exact ballot.

U of L’s Vote Everywhere initiative looks to keep students informed about voting options, deadlines and ways to stay informed as well. They want to ensure that students know the power of their vote and what it means to be informed.

“There’s so many deadlines and it gets really confusing, even for a student like me who is super civically engaged,” said Vote Everywhere Ambassador Wyn Garfinkle-Plymesser.

By hosting events on campus and frequently updating their Instagram page, @UofLVE, Garfinkle-Plymesser and her co-ambassador Arianna Moya engage with students and promote civic engagement within the U of L community.

“We just want to be a space where people can come and get the answers straight up and know what’s really going on,” said Garfinkle-Plymesser. “If they have any concerns about voting or their vote being suppressed, we wanna be the space that students can come to and have their concerns heard and questions answered.”

While Jefferson County is doing their best to make this election as accessible and safe as possible, Kelch recommends that residents vote early if possible and don’t procrastinate sending in a mail-in ballot.

“If you’re done and you’ve signed it completely, both the goldenrod envelope and exterior envelope, and you’ve followed all the directions and are ready to turn it in, please do so immediately,” Kelch said. “Election Day will obviously be very busy.”

For further information regarding the upcoming general election in Jefferson County, please go to elections.jeffersoncountyclerk.org.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

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Churchill Downs announces there will be no fans at the Kentucky Derby Thursday, Sep 3 2020 

By Cole Emery–

The Kentucky Derby will have a different look this year as Churchill Downs officials announced there will be no fans in attendance this year. This came after they planned for a limited attendance of 23,000 guests.

The Kentucky Derby has been held every year since 1875 and has been run on the first Saturday in May every year since 1946. “Louisville is fortunate to have America’s longest continuously held sporting event and the brand awareness associated with this grand tradition,” said Karen Williams, president and CEO of Louisville Tourism.

The good news is that the tradition will continue this year amidst the global pandemic that has reshaped the world since March. The bad news is that the 146th running of this iconic race will be the strangest in history.

“Churchill Downs has worked diligently over the last several months to plan a safe Derby with a limited number of spectators in attendance,” reads a Churchill Downs statement. “We were confident in that plan, but … with the current significant increases in COVID-19 cases in Louisville as well as across the region, we needed to again revisit our planning.”

The decision came after Jefferson County, where Louisville is located, was deemed a “red zone” in terms of coronavirus cases and considered in a “critical” situation. Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear agreed with the decision, calling it, “right and responsible,” according toWLKY.

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Back to School Guide Sunday, Aug 4 2019 

Back to school right around the corner and it is time to get those school supplies, new shoes, and some great new threads for the kids to sport. We have some helpful information to help you make the grade. We know parents have lots of questions when it comes to back to school and we are here to help! We [...]

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