Uncertainty hangs over remaining campus students and resources Monday, Mar 23 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

The Cardinal’s Assistant Editor-in-Chief gives an update on campus life amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Uncertainty hangs over empty walkways and seas of upright chairs. Any other day, a look at an almost empty Ekstrom library and you’d think University of Louisville students were away celebrating some long awaited break.

A week before Spring Break, no one would have predicted U of L President Neeli Bendapudi would make the decision to move classes online until the end of the semester and postpone Spring Commencement.

As the world around us hastily comes to a halt, so does life on U of L’s campuses. While a majority of students are holed up in the apartments or with family preparing for online classes, a few still remain working in “essential” university services like dining or the Campus Store. However as more and more places shut their doors and students are moved out of campus housing, worry continues to grow.

Amber Hurst, a gap year student working at the Campus Bookstore, has been working at the store for five years.

“Things have definitely slowed down a lot, it’s kind of hard to keep being productive,” Hurst said. She said with the state things are in, she’s worried about job security.

Hurst had picked up another job but after working only two weeks, she was told her job would potentially close due to the virus.

“I needed some extra money,” Hurst said. “And now with the Bookstore’s status, I’m a little bit worried.”

Across campus, the Ekstrom Starbucks has noticed a similar drop in traffic. Senior shift manager Davy Adams said they are getting a fair amount of customers in a given hour.

“It depends on the day too,” they said.

Policy changes because of the virus are also evident across U of L’s campus. Restaurants have removed all dine-in seating encouraging customers to continue practicing social distancing. Cleaning has also had an overhaul.

“We have to wipe down all surfaces every 20 minutes. Anything that we are touching with our hands we have to wipe down,” Adams said. They wish though that face masks could be provided for extra precaution. “A few people that work for Campus Dining have them, but they bring them from home,” Adams said.

Adams admitted they don’t feel particularly safe being back, even despite the lack of students. This was a common sentiment among many of the remaining student workers.

“I’m here because I have to make money,” they said. “I don’t want to say that I’m petrified to work here, I feel like we’re doing the best we can do. But as a working class person, what are you gonna do? You gotta work, you gotta make money.”

Even with the closures, and students being told March 18 to leave campus housing, there were still some resources available for students.

Kathy Meyer, assistant director of student leadership, said the Cardinal Cupboard, U of L’s first food pantry, will remain open during the campus closure as long as the SAC remains open. The pantry can be found in room W314.

“In the event that the Cardinal Cupboard must close, we recommend those in need of food search the Dare to Care distribution webpage for a list of mobile pantries and stationary pantries,” Meyer said.

Meyer also suggested students finding themselves in financial emergencies during this time apply for the Louis and Louise W. Wisser Bornwasser Emergency Fund. The fund’s goal is to “assist University of Louisville students who encounter an unforeseen emergency or catastrophic event,” said the Dean of Student’s website.

Photo by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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Girls run the world with annual International Women’s Day celebration Sunday, Mar 15 2020 

By Maria Dinh —

The Women’s Center, Women 4 Women Student Board and Student Activities Board hosted the 7th annual International Women’s Day celebration March 3 in Strickler Auditorium. 

The event had free food, including decorated heart-shaped cookies, in the lobby which also featured booths from the Americana Community Center and the Women’s Center.

Sidney Garner, president of the Women 4 Women Student Board, started the event by asking the audience which woman in their lives has greatly influenced them. She asked students in the audience, “What does International Women’s Day mean to you?” and “Who was the most influential woman in your life?”

A student answered his grandmother. “Growing up, she took care of me from when I was one to seven years old. I would go [to her house] after school. She immigrated over when my mom was seventeen years old. She’s a very strong woman. She has done all of this by herself without my grandpa.”

SAB Diversity Chairs Taleah Gipson and Sarika Polcum hosted the International Women’s Day performance portion. They started out by dedicating this event to every woman—mothers, sisters, aunts, trans women, women of color, disabled women, gender non-conforming women and all other women across the globe.

Students who attended also had a chance to win a free Women’s Center t-shirt during the intermission in a raffle.

Every performance that night featured women in the community. The first two performances were traditional Indian and Bollywood dances. The women in the Vietnamese Student Association performed a traditional hat dance. 

Gloria Fan, a member of VSA, said, “[The dance] is empowering representing not only women, but our culture.”

The Dazzling Cardettes performed a majorette dance with hip hop elements, and The Cardinal K-Pop Dance Team performed two dances to songs from Mamamoo and Chungha. 

To finish off the event, Flamenco Louisville gave a grand finale to this empowering event. 

As Women’s History Month continues, visit the Women’s Center at www.lousiville.edu/womenscenter for more information.

Photo by Maria Dinh // The Louisville Cardinal

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All classes moved online due to spread of COVID-19 Wednesday, Mar 11 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

In an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus at the University of Louisville, President Neeli Bendapudi informed the U of L community U of L’s campuses will remain open but all classes will be moved online from March 18 through April 5.

Along with this change, Spring Break has been extended through March 17 and any on-campus events will continue, but are under review.

International travel and non-domestic business travel has also been suspended effective immediately.

“Our people are, and always will be, our greatest asset and highest priority,” Bendapudi said in her email addressing the new changes.

While campus housing will remain open during this period, the university has recommended that students who are able to stay away from campus until April 5 are encouraged to do so.

Food services, libraries, the food pantry and other campus/student services will also remain open.

Bendapudi said these decisions came after consulting infectious diseases experts at U of L and other higher education leaders across the state and nation.

“We understand that these restrictions will cause significant inconvenience for many of you,” Bendapudi said, “Please know that we do not make these restrictions and recommendations lightly. I am convinced that these measures are essential to preserve the health and well-being of our University community and all citizens of the Commonwealth.”

For more information on COVID-19 visit the CDC’s frequently updated page on any new information regarding the virus.

File Photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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Dorms battle for “green” prize Wednesday, Feb 12 2020 

By Grace Welsh —

The University of Louisville Sustainability Council has teamed up with Recyclemania to engage students and faculty in a competition between 141 North American universities to promote eco-conscious lifestyles.

The event, known as Ecolympics 2020, will happen from Feb. 2 to March 28 and encourages reducing waste, recycling and composting across campus.

The consumption of single-use disposables is rampant across the nation, but the U of L Sustainability Council is encouraging students to cut back by bringing their own items and taking advantage of U of L’s single-stream recycling system when possible.

The council will also be collecting food waste from dining locations such as the Ville Grill. Weekly winners who share images of their eco-efforts to Instagram or Facebook, tagging @UofLSustainable, will have a chance to win a gift card to Comfy Cow Ice Cream, Heine Bros. Coffee and others locations.

Ecolympics 2020 also includes a “Residence Hall Conservation Throw-Down” from Feb. 2 through Feb. 24. The nine residence halls on campus will be in competition with one another to see who can reduce their electricity use the most over the next three weeks.

Residents are encouraged to unplug their unused devices, turn off lights, take quicker showers, skip the elevator or turn down the heat. In addition to the weekly winners of the gift cards to Comfy Cow and Heine Bros., one resident who goes above and beyond during Ecolympics 2020 will receive a restored vintage Schwinn bicycle.

According to the buildingOS dashboard, Louisville Hall is currently in the lead with a 3.6 percent reduction of electricity since Feb. 4, while Kurz Hall is in last place with a 10.1 percent increase.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Exploring intersecting identities with Queer Eye’s culture expert Tuesday, Feb 11 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

Karamo Brown, culture expert on the Netflix reboot of “Queer Eye,” came prepared to laugh and get deep with the Louisville community Feb. 5. Students, staff, faculty and community members alike packed the Student Activities Center’s ballroom just to see the three-time Emmy winner and hear his thoughts on the intersections of identity.

Along with “Queer Eye,” Brown also appeared on “Dancing with the Stars” in 2019 and “The Real World: Philadelphia” in 2004. He has also worked as a social worker, written a memoir and co-authored a book with his son Jason. Lately, Brown has been working on his podcast, “Karamo,” and a new skin care line.

The Student Activities Board, LGBT Center and Black Student Union coordinated the event.

Brown learned how to grow and learn from his multitude of identities as a black man, an openly gay man, a son of immigrant parents, a Christian, a single father and former social worker.

“Being here in this room with us, sends a powerful message about who we are, what we care about and value. And that’s inclusion and celebrating all the identities that make us a community,” said Brian Buford, director of employee development and success at the University of Louisville.

Brown talked about his childhood and how it was a struggle for him to celebrate who he was.

“Growing up in Texas, to immigrant parents, with the name Karamo, it was not cute, okay?” Brown said. “There were a lot of times I felt alone and isolated. I knew that I was different because I would bring things to lunch that I loved, like curry goat or ox tails, and people at school would immediately let me know that it wasn’t okay to bring.”

As a child, Brown began to internalize that being different was a bad thing. He even changed his name to Jason because people would make a face when he said his real name.

“Sometimes the faces hurt more than the words, because it was like I ‘m showing you who I am and I’m proud of who I am and then your response to be curious is ‘What?!'” Brown said, “That is a very hard pill to swallow when you’re a kid, especially when you’re still trying to build your self-esteem and figure out who you are in this big world.”

Phoenix Washington, a recent Liberal Arts graduate, said it was freeing to hear Karamo speak.

“It was nice to hear about someone with a checkered past who used their identities to build themselves up,” Washington said. “Even more freeing as a queer black person trying to figure out where you fit.”

On being “marginalized.”

This discontent to all his identities, Brown said came from a shared understanding from the people around him and the media: different meant not as good.

“It meant you’re not as special, that you don’t deserve as much,” Brown said.  “And I remember getting around the age of 13 or 14 where I started to hear this word marginalized.”

It’s something we still hear to this day and is all over news outlets. Brown said at 14 he didn’t really understand what it meant when people around him began saying he was apart of marginalized communities, but now fully understands the power and implication of the word.

“There’s an undertone. When someone says you’re part of a marginalized community, they’re saying you don’t deserve access, you’re not going to attain what someone else has attained, you don’t have the right to do so,” Brown said. “When I look at myself as a black man, as a son of immigrants, as a gay man–I don’t think of any of these things as marginal. I think of all of these things as gifts that I’ve been given to create a better life for myself.”

Battling a diminished self-esteem.

But at the time, his self-esteem was still lacking due to all the negative things he was hearing from people around him. Brown realized they were projecting their fears and issues on him. “It was causing me anxiety,” Brown said.

“I realized if I wanted to have better self-esteem, one of the things I could personally do and start doing immediately was practicing not repeating the negative things I heard about myself.”

Brown said the only way to combat that feeling of waking up in the morning and wishing something about yourself is different is to stop repeating the negative things people say about you. He said you have to start saying the good things about yourself.

“All of your identities make you special, like I said, they are gifts to me,” Brown said, “The reason I have my job on ‘Queer Eye’ is because I literally went into a room full of 100 other gay guys and decided I was not going to be ashamed of any part of my identities. I said to myself, ‘no one in here has all of my identities, I’m going to share with them what is great about me.'”

Brown said that despite this, people will try to stifle your voice, or that we ourselves will stifle our own voices.

“Social media culture makes it so very easy to look at someone’s life and say ‘Wow. Look at what they’ve done, what’s wrong with me?'” Brown said, “Let me tell you something, when it comes to your identities and appreciating and loving every part of you–comparison is the thief of joy.”

More than just black and gay.

This is all to say that the biggest part of Brown’s identity has nothing to do with his appearance, sexuality or background. It’s his ability to ask for help and his ability to start again.

“That’s why I don’t like New Year’s resolutions,” Brown said, “No one says that if you don’t make your New Year’s resolution in the timeline you thought, that you can actually start again. I want everyone in here to remember that part of your identity is your ability to ask for help if you don’t know what you’re doing and also to start again.”

“Every day is a brand new day and we know that to be true. One of the things I know to be true, and I’ve said this on ‘Queer Eye,’ is that failure is not the opposite of success. It’s part of it.”

Brown said that by doing this and allowing yourself to make mistakes, you free yourself from the shackles of yesterday.

“If a little child were here right now, and we were like ‘He’s about to start walking for the first time!’ and he fell and busted his head,” Brown said, “none of us would be like ‘You’re never gonna walk again!'” To which Brown and the audience laughed.

Curiosity and the soul.

Another one of the many big takeaways Brown wanted the audience to remember was that they should strive to stay curious. As kids, we were continually told to explore and try new things, but at some point that stops.

We get into cliques and avoid anything different.

“I’m a big believer that’s where we stop learning how to connect with people and with the world around us–when we stop being curious,” Brown said.

Instead, Brown wants people to be excited about different cultures and foods.”When you get excited about something new you start to begin to open yourself up to new possibilities. You start to find yourself getting curious about so many things around you that you didn’t know you could be curious about,” Brown said.

“Curiosity feeds your soul and mind in such a way, believe me.”

And Brown does this everyday.

“What it does for me is I start to learn. The more I learn, the more I grow, the more I grow the more I can connect with other people. The more that I connect with other people the more I feel alive and apart of this world.”

Photo by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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University phones malfunction across all three U of L campuses Monday, Feb 10 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

Across all three campuses, University of Louisville staff phones displayed a warning message that alerted staff and faculty to evacuate buildings immediately. The message came late afternoon Feb. 7.

A RAVE alert was sent out to students and staff at 4:36 p.m. informing them of the false alarm.

“U of L phone systems experienced a malfunction,” the RAVE alert read, “Please disregard any notice about immediate evacuation.”

John Karman, director of media relations for U of L, said normally the type of message U of L phones displayed only appears during emergency situations.

“We don’t know what caused the phones to malfunction,” Karman said.

Even though the message was just a malfunction, campus employees and students reacted as if the unknown threat was real.

In the Student Activities Center, the Campus Bookstore’s managers evacuated its customers and employees. One employee, Emma Betancourt, a senior exercise science major, told the Cardinal how she was worried about the situation.

“I was concerned about what we needed to do in order to get out of the building in a timely manner,” Betancourt said.

Betancourt was hopefully that others got out of the SAC in time in the event the strange message was a real warning. “I didn’t want to go back into the building since nobody seemed to know what was going on.”

Meanwhile on the other end of the Belknap campus, the Student Recreation Center’s staff members took a similar response.

Brooke Dotson, a freshman dental hygiene major, was working at the front desk of the SRC when she was told to evacuate the building.

“I was alert and alarmed,” Dotson said.

“My first thought was of what to do right away because you never know what those messages are about or what is going on,” Dotson said, “I immediately just knew to get everyone out of the building so they could find safety.”

Photo by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal 

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Jazz band’s first year performance goes off without a hitch Thursday, Jan 16 2020 

By Kyla Thomas —

The University of Louisville Jazz band had their first performance of the new year Jan. 10, and they surely started off with a bang.

With several upbeat selections and a few slow jams, the concert was a delight to all in attendance.

Junior english major Brady Alexander said, “I had always heard about how good our music program was, and I decided to give it a shot today. I was blown away by how great they sounded, as well as how professional they all seem. I hope that the people in the band that want to pursue a career in music have success, they deserve it.”

Students of the music school loved the performance as well, especially because they appreciate how much work goes into a performance like that. Freshman music school student Zoey Mullins sang the band’s praises too.

“As someone who’s in the music school, I know how much work goes into having the perfect piece, and to have such a good concert, you can really tell how much effort everyone put in,” Mullins said. “They really should be proud.” 

The School of Music has a calendar for all their upcoming events this semester on the university website. Other events coming up are a concert hosted by students in the electronic music program on Jan. 15 and the Music eX Series on Jan. 19.  

File Photo// The Louisville Cardinal

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The Speed Art Museum stayed busy over winter-break Wednesday, Jan 8 2020 

By Zoe Watkins —

Though many buildings on campus closed over winter break, a few still operated during those weeks.

The Speed Art Museum’s usual After Hours at the Speed happened Dec. 13. This event takes place on the third Friday of every month where the museum stays open until 10 p.m. During these hours, guests get to explore their permanent collection along with visiting exhibitions.

However, the fun part of the night belongs to the ranging music with the many unique performances. Guests can also dine on food provided by the Wiltshire Café.

Each After Hours at the Speed is unique in its own way with the next one being Jan. 17.

Admission is 20 dollars though U of L students get in for free.

One of their regular workshops, “Adult Workshop Back to Basics: Gold Leafing,” took place on Dec. 14. Participants learned about the process of art restoration and learned how to use faux gold-leaf with different techniques. People either got to bring a small wooden object from home to work with or create a new golden picture frame.

Besides workshops, there have also been a few films that passed through the cinema. A major one that left Dec. 29 was the 21st Annual Animation Show of Shows. Various students and professionals from around the world showcased their animated short films. “The Fox and the Bird” by Sam and Fred Guillaume and “Kids” by Michael Frei and Mario von Rickenbach were two of the short films.

The exhibition “Loose Nuts: Bert Hurley’s West End Story” features the work of Louisville native and African-American artist Bert Hurley.  It primarily focuses on her novella “Loose Nuts: A Rapsody in Brown” which contains over 125 pages that are colorfully illustrated and handwritten, covering a range of media from crayon to ink wash.

Another exhibition is “Tales from the Turf: The Kentucky Horse” which holds many differing paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints and manuscripts from all different creators. It tells the story of the relationship between the horse and Kentucky that is often seen throughout the state from its identity to the bluegrass state’s historical roots.

There is still more to come to the Speed where pieces from famous painter Andy Warhol will be present in the exhibition “Andy Warhol: Revelation” that will be coming April 3.  It will focus on Warhol’s relationship with his catholic faith and how it has been mixed in with his artwork.  The 100 pieces that come from the collection at The Andy Warhol Museum will be staying at the museum until August 21.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Keeping up with the resolutions Tuesday, Jan 7 2020 

By Zoe Watkins —

Every year, thousands of people make resolutions for the upcoming year; however, few stay committed to what they hope to do in the first few months while barely anyone even accomplishes these resolutions. Here are some simple tricks to stay on track.

Stick to set limits and be realistic. If it becomes more reachable, then the likelihood of achieving the goal increases. So instead of a goal of reading 50 books, try reading around 15 or 20.

Planning and outlining always works for the best. Coming up with a goal on the spot won’t work out for the near future as the thought process behind it was just for that day. Spend some time on the goal and put more thought and effort into it. Also plan in advance for days when the temptation gets too much and come up with ways to avoid it.

Tell people about it. Telling others the goal will allow them to be more supportive. Also talking to a friend always works to stay on track.  Maybe someone has the same goal, or there’s a group out there where everyone supports each other to reach that one resolution everyone shares.

Keeping track of all the progress that has been made. Using a planner to show the progress that has been made over the months will help keep you motivated. Each small step or achievement towards the greater picture will help with focus. So, every minute of walking and then running will help in the long run when it’s time to run that 5k.

Have a cheat day once in a while. Having some time to celebrate any recent achievements is perfect for motivation and inspiration to keep ongoing. So have that large sundae or go on that shopping trip to Mall St. Matthews. Just don’t overdue it and have the celebration go against the resolution.

Even if it’s hard to stick to the plan and a few mistakes are made along the way, it’s nothing to worry about. It just happens sometimes and all that can be done is to keep moving forward. As well as taking a little break, that’s okay. Start back up when the time is right and go from there.

Also, maybe over time, the resolution will turn into a habit. It takes about two months for anything to become a daily habit. So though it will take time, keep striving towards that goal, and over time, it will seem like it is just part of daily life.

Graphic by Shayla Kerr // The Louisville Cardinal

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ULPD introduces new motorcycle program to increase safety Sunday, Dec 1 2019 

By Matthew Keck —

University of Louisville students can expect to see two University of Louisville Police Department (ULPD) motorcycles around campus from now on. ULPD is testing out a new motorcycle program to enhance campus safety.

“The University of Louisville Police Department has a consistent and proactive goal of innovation and enhancing safety across campus,” said ULPD chief Gary Lewis. “The addition of the Motorcycle Unit will enhance our ability to perform our mission. Motorcycles are cost and energy efficient, display effective mobility techniques, strengthen and builds [sic] upon public and community relations while improving campus coverage response times.”

Harley Davidson is leasing the motorcycles to ULPD for this program. The program’s cost will be $30,000 over the next three years said Lewis. Lewis also said this will be $10,000 cheaper than buying a new Ford SUV police cruiser.

Due to their smaller nature, these motorcycles will be used to monitor high traffic areas. “By their nature, high traffic areas can make it difficult to position a patrol car. Motorcycles, however, can be more effective at these locations due to the ease with which they can be positioned,” said Lewis. “Motorcycles can also assimilate into traffic for enforcement purposes easier than conventional patrol vehicles.”

ULPD also plans on using the motorcycles to cut down response times and provide more surveillance on campus. “The police motorcycle’s surveillance of the area can be overt to maximize the visible deterrent impact or covert to maximize tactical objectives,” said Lewis.

Lewis hopes this operation can be used in conjunction with educational campaigns and public information around campus. “Some agencies have even used these types of events to roll out new shipments of police motorcycles,” said Lewis. “Agencies can advertise the purchase of the motorcycles and associate them with a specific problem, whether it is red light running, speeding, aggressive driving, or some other traffic problem in that agency’s jurisdiction.”

Three ULPD officers trained for this program: Sgt. Oscar Chavez, Don Gosney and Doug Howard. The program has been in effect as of Nov. 11.

Photo Courtesy of ULPD

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