Positive COVID cases reach 385, testing extended until end of semester Monday, Sep 21 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

The University of Louisville’s total number of positive COVID-19 cases is now at 385, out of a total of 24,092 administered tests. U of L’s cumulative positivity rate is still slowly rising as well, currently it is at 1.60% as of Sept. 21.

U of L Director of Communications John Karman was unable to confirm how many of these cases are still active.

“The data that the university is making available to the public is reported on U of L’s COVID website,” he said.

However, the Cardinal was able to find a report by the Kentucky Public Health office, that said U of L has three active COVID-19 cases among students as of Sept. 19.

Karman could not confirm these three cases or if there are anymore active cases on campus.

“I’ve provided all of the information that is available to me,” he said.

He did tell the Cardinal that free testing for all on-campus individuals is extended until the end of the semester. More information on testing locations and where to register for tests has not been released yet.

Students, faculty and staff who frequent campus are required by the Student Code of Conduct and Redbook to get tested for COVID-19. Those who do not get tested may face disciplinary action.

Although, Karman said no action has been taken yet on individuals who have not been tested.

“While the university has the ability to discipline students, faculty and staff who have not been tested,” he said. “It has chosen, to this point, not to do so.”

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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U of L still unsure number of active COVID cases, reports 372 total positive Friday, Sep 18 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

In the latest update by the University of Louisville on Sept. 18, positive COVID-19 cases at the university are now at 372. Of those, 98 are within the athletics department Associate Athletic Director Kenny Klein told the Cardinal. The current positivity rate is at 1.58%, however this has slowly been rising over the past few weeks.

The 7-day rolling average positivity rate has reached the highest it’s been to-date at 3.27%.

This week alone saw a spike in positivity at 2.7% out of 1,558 tests, 42 of which came back positive. This is the first time the rate for one week has been above 2% since the first week of testing.

It should be noted, however, that because the number of administered tests has decreased over the past few weeks, this may potentially skew the rolling average and positivity rate to look as though it is increasing.

When asked if he knew the number of still active cases at U of L, Director of Communications John Karman said he still did not have that information. He also did not have any information pertaining to the number of individuals tested within the campus community’s population.

“The testing data that the university is releasing is all included on the COVID dashboard,” Karman said. “U of L is currently not releasing information about active cases, no. of individual people tested, etc.”

Graphic by Joseph Garcia // The Louisville Cardinal

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School of Music duo share acoustic folk sound online Friday, Sep 18 2020 


By Tate Luckey —

One University of Louisville duo is bringing authenticity to their music in hopes of connecting with listeners. 

Murphy Lamb and Andrew Chapman, both U of L School of Music seniors, started their band, The Brothers’ Mother, around the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

So far, the self-described acoustic folk duo have cultivated a debut EP, Oasis, and multiple live streamed performances.

The pair, whose influences range from bluegrass and country groups like Tony Rice and Nickel Creek, to old school contemporary christian singers like Rich Mullins, have an authentic, folk sound that includes acoustic guitar, delicate harmonies and lush piano tones. 

“We have a real simple, ‘stripped down’ vibe,” Lamb said.

Lamb and Chapman know too that if there’s a time where authenticity is needed, it’s now.

“We wouldn’t exist if the pandemic didn’t happen,” Chapman said. The roommates-turned-musicians recorded all their songs on nothing more than a USB mic in their apartment. 

“We had been playing music for a while, but didn’t start writing until the pandemic,” Chapman said. 

They collaborate on both ends of the songwriting spectrum, meaning both can come to each other with ideas or lyrics.

Like a modern-day Lennon/McCartney, if Chapman comes to Lamb, he usually has a lyric or concept he needs to flesh out. If Lamb comes to Chapman, he almost always has some sort of chord progression or musical idea. 

The recording process itself is where both share a mix of excitement and nervousness.

“It was actually pretty convenient because of the limitedness [of the setup], but also super challenging because we hadn’t done it before or had had a time limit,” Lamb said.

Their 5 song EP, Oasis, is about getting to know someone and their feelings. An underlying theme present in their songs is a fostering of familial connection with the listener.

“‘Making it is not a goal of mine or Andrew’s,” Lamb said when asked about their future careers as musicians. “We’re just hanging out and writing songs.”

Chapman agreed, saying his biggest goal is to make the type of music people will love. His favorite song from Oasis is “Feeling Known.”

“To me, the whole idea is about a connection through music,” Chapman said.

Oasis is available on all streaming platforms. The band recently performed live in the Red Barn as part of  SAB Concert Committee’s  “SAB Live!”  You can catch the recap of that performance on Youtube here. Interested in keeping up with The Brothers’ Mother? Follow them at @thebrothersmother on social media.

Photo Courtesy // The Brothers’ Mother

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Students come to grips with campus life during a pandemic Friday, Sep 18 2020 

By Gabriel Howard —

As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps the nation, schools have had to come up with new and creative ways to provide a safe and engaging learning environment. And while the inclusion of online courses has been a welcome addition, how have things been for those who still have classes in-person?

Dealing with the pandemic has been a challenge for the university. Moving most classes online has helped ease the stress of delivering classes to the students.

However, roughly 30% of the students enrolled are still having to go to in-person classes during the fall semester.

Diana Romero, a freshman, shared that her experience on campus this fall is much different than when she visited last year.

“When I toured here this time last year the campus seemed vibrant and full of life. I was excited to experience all of the things you would expect in your freshman year,” Romero said. “Things feel different now that classes have finally started. All of the things I wanted to do are simply impossible in the current climate. The campus itself feels quiet and is completely different from what I expected.”

Romero also felt that her experience with in-person classes is much different from what she expected. She commends professors for making it as welcoming as possible, but still feels a little weird going to in-person classes amidst a global pandemic.

The required COVID-19 testing she and her classmates have participated in has eased nerves slightly.

Her experience is something a lot of students can relate to. Most have opted for an entirely online schedule to minimize the risk that coming to campus and potentially being exposed to COVID-19 presents.

In a normal fall semester, campus is usually packed, however, it now feels like it is finals week 24/7. Food lines are small and the classrooms are even smaller. And with the pandemic showing no signs of slowing down, this will unfortunately be our new norm for the foreseeable future.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Bendapudi challenges faculty to new “Grand Challenges” initiative Wednesday, Sep 16 2020 

By Victoria Doll — 

University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi is challenging faculty to use their research and scholarships to improve local communities through a new initiative called the “Three Grand Challenges.”

These challenges, identified by the Grand Challenges subcommittee, include: empowering local communities, advancing local health and engineering a future economy.

“We will help create communities where everyone has a voice, a choice and the opportunity to thrive,” Bendapudi said

The “Advancing Our Health” initiative seeks to help people live longer, healthier and more resilient lives. The final challenge, “Engineering Our Future Economy,” is aimed at designing a future of unmatched opportunity and incredible possibility.

By having the Grand Challenges subcommittee powered by researchers and experts from many disciplines, Bendapudi is confident that the U of L community can contribute valuable research to overcome these challenges.

“These are big, global problems our U of L community can help solve through multi-disciplinary research and scholarship. This transformative effort will take all of us — our researchers, scholars, innovators and students across every discipline at U of L. It is time for us to organize and move these challenges forward together,” she said.

Bendapudi went on to say that the solutions found to overcome these challenges will aid in creating a brighter future for Louisville, the state of Kentucky and the world beyond.

U of L is currently looking for faculty who desire to contribute to the “Three Grand Challenges” initiative. Interested faculty can fill out the “Join the Challenge” form.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Andy Warhol exhibit gives look into pop artist’s influences Monday, Sep 14 2020 

By Kyla Thomas  —

An art exhibit on pop artist Andy Warhol is on display at the Speed Art Museum until Nov. 29–and it’s free for University of Louisville students. 

Warhol is best known for his work designing the Campbell’s soup logo and his pop art of Marilyn Monroe. “Andy Warhol: Revelation” highlights a new side of Warhol’s career, focusing more on his religious pieces and the story behind not only the art, but how the art correlates to Warhol himself.

The exhibit opens with a biography of Warhol, which talks about his sexuality as a gay man and how he managed to balance that part of himself while growing up in a religious community. Plaques at the museum said that “he made a point of regularly popping into his local parish to pray even if it was only for five or ten minutes.” Although he was deeply involved in a religion that condemned his sexuality, Warhol remained openly gay, and was a fixture in New York’s Queer underground. 

Many of Warhol’s pieces on display lie in this balance too, such as his recreation of Raphael Madonna. Warhol would take religious works of art and recreate it in his own unique style, he did this with “The Last Supper,” and a portrait of Jesus as well. 


SEE: Photo Gallery of the “Andy Warhol: Revelation” exhibit by Cardinal photo editor Anthony Riley. 


Through his art he showed two sides of his identity that came together to create the person he was, and through those pieces he showed that you can be both. 

Brady Alexander, a senior English major, said he enjoyed Warhol’s embracing of contradictions within his own identity.

“I love how [the art] highlighted that you have the ability to be both, you can still be true to yourself without having to give up something that gives you faith that things can be better,” Alexander said.

The exhibit doesn’t just focus on Warhol’s personal life, it also showed his love for women. Throughout the exhibit you can find portraits of women who he saw as powerful, such his mother and Jackie Kennedy. One photo shows a mother breastfeeding, as Warhol wanted to show how women not only gave birth to everything, but they nurture everything as well.

“I took my boyfriend here as a date, because we both liked [Warhol’s] pop art that we would periodically see,” Victoria Johnson, a political science major, said. “After going through the exhibit, we saw a different side of an artist that we loved but didn’t truly know the history behind. Now that we know, it’s like we love his art even more.” 

The “Andy Warhol: Revelation” exhibit will remain at the Speed Art Museum until Nov. 29. Due to COVID-19, hours are limited to only Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. More information and tickets reservations can be made on the Speed Art Museum’s website

Graphic by Alexis Simon // The Louisville Cardinal

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Photo Gallery: “Andy Warhol: Revelation” exhibit at the Speed Art Museum Monday, Sep 14 2020 

 

 

 

Photos by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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Louisville’s Cardinals hold off WKU in season opener Sunday, Sep 13 2020 

By John McCarthy–

The University of Louisville Cardinals football team defeated the Western Kentucky University Hilltoppers 35-21 at Cardinal Stadium in the first game of the season.

WKU put points on the board first with a rushing touchdown at the Cardinals’ goal line to go up 7-0. U of L struck right back with a pass from junior Micale Cunningham to Ean Pfeifer for a 28-yard touch pass to put the score at 7-7. At the end of the first quarter, Cunningham had completed 6 of his 11 passes and threw for 181 yards. Sophomore wide receiver Braden Smith had two receptions for 111 yards.

The Cardinals picked up where they left off in the second quarter. Cunningham rushed in for a 14-yard touchdown only six seconds into the second quarter to put the score at 14-7. Five minutes later, sophomore running back Javian Hawkins rushed in for a 19-yard touchdown to put U of L up 21-7 over the Hilltoppers.

Near the end of the second quarter, Cunningham completed a pass to sophomore Marshon Ford for the touchdown with only 42 seconds left in the half. Louisville was in the driver seat going into half time with a score of 28-7. WKU was scoreless in the second quarter.

Western Kentucky bounced back in the third quarter after a one-yard rushing touchdown to cut the deficit to 14 points. The Cardinals fired back with a 70-yard completion from Cunningham to senior wide receiver Dez Fitzpatrick for a touchdown. Louisville led Western Kentucky 35-14 going into the final quarter of play.

Louisville’s defense held up in the fourth quarter only allowing a 12-yard touchdown pass for the Hilltoppers. U of L ended up coming away with a two-touchdown lead to secure the victory 35-21.

Cunningham threw for 343 yards and gathered three touchdowns. Junior running back Hassan Hall ran for 66 yards on six carries. Fitzpatrick and Smith both grabbed four catches for 110 yards apiece. Junior wide receiver Tutu Atwell totaled 78 yards on seven catches.

The Cardinals will begin ACC conference play next week when they take on the University of Miami Hurricanes Sept.19. The game will begin at 7:30 p.m. at Cardinal Stadium. Louisville will look to avenge their loss from last season when they visited the Hurricanes in Coral Gables, Fla.

Photo Courtesy of ACC Media 

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Positive COVID-19 cases at U of L rise above 300 Friday, Sep 11 2020 

By Joseph Garcia — 

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases at the University of Louisville has risen to 315 as of Sept. 11. This is out of 21,097 total tests administered, making the cumulative positivity rate 1.49%.

U of L’s Athletics department makes up 93 of those positive cases according to Associate Athletic Director Kenny Klein.

When asked what number of these positive cases are currently active, U of L Director of Communications John Karman said that he did not have any more information beyond what is posted on the dashboard.

Previously Karman told the Cardinal that U of L had 40 beds available for isolating individuals positive with COVID-19. At this time, Karman said that the university is “not near capacity,” but did not provide a statistic as to what capacity of those beds were filled.

Compared to other universities, U of L is doing well in terms of preventing the spread of the virus.

Phillip Bressoud, executive director of campus health, said in a U of L News release on Sept. 1 that there were many factors that went into U of L’s early success. Including U of L’s contact tracing efforts, limiting of large gatherings on and off campus, and the university community’s adherence to protocols laid out by the university and state.

However, the university’s testing dashboard is bare of information compared to these other universities.

The University of Kentucky’s dashboard includes breakdowns of cases by university population (students/faculty/staff), how many cases are still active and to what capacity their isolation spaces are filled.

When asked if there was a reason U of L wasn’t being as transparent with this information as other universities have, Karman said that “U of L is providing information consistent with the governor’s office.”

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

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University music programs adapt to COVID-19 restrictions Friday, Sep 11 2020 

By Tate Luckey —

Whether it’s halftime at Cardinal Stadium or onstage in Comstock Hall, the level of work and dedication that goes into a performance by any one of the University of Louisville’s arts programs is impressive. What is even more impressive is how these programs have adapted in the face of a global pandemic. 

“Our first change of the semester was kicking off Band Camp with mandatory COVID-19 testing for the full band,” Amy Acklin, director of the Cardinal Marching Band, said. Other changes have included rehearsing outdoors only, performing in groups of 50 people or less and staggering rehearsals. 

Natalie Humble, Head Drum Major, said that since testing has been routine, students have adjusted to the changes well.

“We started our routine of safety right at the beginning of band camp (after we all had the opportunity to do drive thru testing), and it has become very habitual over the last few weeks,Humble said.

But it hasn’t been easy for everyone in the band.

“The purpose of marching band is to entertain, and part of that includes having actual marching band shows. Not being able to do that has been sad,”  Rachel Wilson, a clarinetist/sideline conductor, said.

And while not being able to perform in front of large audiences is disappointing to many of the students in these programs. For instance, the CMB will not be able to do the traditional Cardinal March on the field at any football games. However, the CMB has found a bit of a workaround.

We will perform at each home football game this season. We will play in the stands, including our traditional Pre-Game Show,” Acklin said. “Because of social distancing rules, we can only have 54 people in our band seating area, including students and staff.”

In addition to football games, the CMB will play at various community events. In September, they will perform at 8 Trilogy Healthcare assisted living homes throughout Louisville for residents who have been quarantined for months. They are also collaborating with U of L Health to perform at 5 hospitals in the area, during the “shift change” for doctors and nurses to cheer them on and thank them for serving on the frontlines.

And the band plans on playing virtually too, depending on if the university decides to transition to a fully online program.

“The Cardinal Marching Band is committed to make virtual videos and bring as much Cardinal Cheer as we can to the community!” Acklin said.

Photo Courtesy // The Cardinal Marching Band

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