Blog – West of Ninth 2019-07-10 20:33:34 Wednesday, Jul 10 2019 

“I was born in 1945, right there on Cedar Street. The house is torn down, now. It was right there on the corner. It used to be Club Morraco and all the houses in the area, on that corner. I gotta whole lotta steps on that street - a whole lot of steps. Sam Cooke and all the singers came to Club Morraco back in the fifties.  It wasn’t like it is now, you know, with all the killings and stuff. We had our little spats but they were fists fights and you would go on about your merrily way. We didn’t have any gangs. We had our own little crew that we ran around with. As far as fighting and shooting, that wasn’t going on with the younger people. The older people were the ones doing all the shooting. You didn’t play with them older people.  I was born and raised in the Russell area. We moved from Cedar Street to 19th, between Walnut and Madison Street. Our address was 513, where that empty lot is, where Jay’s Restaurant used to be. There used to be a house right there on that corner. I had a good time, growing up. I didn’t have nothing to squawk about. I come from a good family with five boys and two girls.  It was kinda rough. Some people had food on the table and some people didn’t. We were fortunate. My father was a minister and he had his own church. We ate well but back in the forties and fifties, it was rough but we made it. That’s the main thing - we made it. I graduated from Central High School in ‘63 and went in the Navy and never looked back.  I left in ‘63 and came back in ‘67. I stayed in the navy for four years, oversees. I stayed near the French Riviera. After being over there, I moved to New York and stayed for a while but I decided to come back home. When I came home, I had a good time here. I went to school and worked. I worked at Olin Mathieson, the powder plant. I left there and went to the P. Lorillard Tobacco Factory  that was on 30th and Muhammad Ali. I spent 34 years down there. I started working there in ‘72 and retired in ‘06. I was a mechanic and worked on machinery.  When I moved back, I moved out in the county, off Manslick Rd. I met this young lady and we got married and eventually separated. I left there and moved to St. Matthews, out in Oxmoor, then I came back to the West End. I love the West End. I came back to West End about 20 years ago.  I like to sit out. My friend comes around and tells me that I’m always meddlin’. I’m not meddlin’, I just like to know what’s around me. I like to meet new people. I know everybody up and down this block. We don’t have any problems in this area. I’m out here every day. I won’t sit out in the sun when it’s too warm out. I gotta shade tree that I’ll sit right under. I’ll get a breeze every now and then but as long as this bad boy don’t fall, I’m cool. I sometimes leave here and will walk down to the church, down the block, but I belong to Bethel Baptist Church on 35th and Garland.  I’m here because I like being here. I live by myself because me and my girlfriend couldn’t get along. We separated. I had another girlfriend and we couldn’t get along either and we separated, too.  I don’t have no ill feelings about the West End. I’ll never talk bad about the West End. I hear people do that all the time. I always say that the West End is the best end! There’s crime everywhere; you can’t get around it.  Time changes and nothing stays the same. Like I tell people, “Seasons change, so you know time’s gonna change.” Nothing stays the same. Hold on and don’t take no wooden nickels. Seasons change. Nothing is perfect, so hold on and it’ll get away from you. Don’t give up!” - Benjamin, Parkland

“I was born in 1945, right there on Cedar Street. The house is torn down, now. It was right there on the corner. It used to be Club Morraco and all the houses in the area, on that corner. I gotta whole lotta steps on that street - a whole lot of steps. Sam Cooke and all the singers came to Club Morraco back in the fifties.

It wasn’t like it is now, you know, with all the killings and stuff. We had our little spats but they were fists fights and you would go on about your merrily way. We didn’t have any gangs. We had our own little crew that we ran around with. As far as fighting and shooting, that wasn’t going on with the younger people. The older people were the ones doing all the shooting. You didn’t play with them older people.

I was born and raised in the Russell area. We moved from Cedar Street to 19th, between Walnut and Madison Street. Our address was 513, where that empty lot is, where Jay’s Restaurant used to be. There used to be a house right there on that corner. I had a good time, growing up. I didn’t have nothing to squawk about. I come from a good family with five boys and two girls.

It was kinda rough. Some people had food on the table and some people didn’t. We were fortunate. My father was a minister and he had his own church. We ate well but back in the forties and fifties, it was rough but we made it. That’s the main thing - we made it. I graduated from Central High School in ‘63 and went in the Navy and never looked back.

I left in ‘63 and came back in ‘67. I stayed in the navy for four years, oversees. I stayed near the French Riviera. After being over there, I moved to New York and stayed for a while but I decided to come back home. When I came home, I had a good time here. I went to school and worked. I worked at Olin Mathieson, the powder plant. I left there and went to the P. Lorillard Tobacco Factory

that was on 30th and Muhammad Ali. I spent 34 years down there. I started working there in ‘72 and retired in ‘06. I was a mechanic and worked on machinery.

When I moved back, I moved out in the county, off Manslick Rd. I met this young lady and we got married and eventually separated. I left there and moved to St. Matthews, out in Oxmoor, then I came back to the West End. I love the West End. I came back to West End about 20 years ago.

I like to sit out. My friend comes around and tells me that I’m always meddlin’. I’m not meddlin’, I just like to know what’s around me. I like to meet new people. I know everybody up and down this block. We don’t have any problems in this area. I’m out here every day. I won’t sit out in the sun when it’s too warm out. I gotta shade tree that I’ll sit right under. I’ll get a breeze every now and then but as long as this bad boy don’t fall, I’m cool. I sometimes leave here and will walk down to the church, down the block, but I belong to Bethel Baptist Church on 35th and Garland.

I’m here because I like being here. I live by myself because me and my girlfriend couldn’t get along. We separated. I had another girlfriend and we couldn’t get along either and we separated, too.

I don’t have no ill feelings about the West End. I’ll never talk bad about the West End. I hear people do that all the time. I always say that the West End is the best end! There’s crime everywhere; you can’t get around it.

Time changes and nothing stays the same. Like I tell people, “Seasons change, so you know time’s gonna change.” Nothing stays the same. Hold on and don’t take no wooden nickels. Seasons change. Nothing is perfect, so hold on and it’ll get away from you. Don’t give up!” - Benjamin, Parkland

These 50 new restaurants and bars have opened around Louisville in 2019 Wednesday, Jul 10 2019 

More than 20 restaurants have opened their doors around Louisville since the start of 2019.

       

Louisville archbishop announces cancer diagnosis Wednesday, Jul 10 2019 

Archbishop Joseph Kurtz said he was diagnosed with cancer in his bladder and prostate in his leadership briefing July 10.

        

Louisville events this week: Kentucky State Fair Horse Show & more Wednesday, Jul 10 2019 

From the 50th Street Rood Association Nationals to Chocolate Fest and the Oldham County Fair, there's something for everyone this week in Louisville.

       

Watch the Bourbon Review Series For a Sneak Peek of the Bourbon Lodge Selection! Wednesday, Jul 10 2019 

This year, we’re excited to team up with The Bourbon Review and Justin’s House of Bourbon! Their team takes you behind the scenes for a sneak peek of what you can find on-site at the Bourbon Lodge this weekend!

 



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The 502 Bar & Bistro, a jewel in Norton Commons Wednesday, Jul 10 2019 

For any chef, an invitation to come cook at James Beard House in New York City is an honor devoutly to be wished. To get there before turning 30 marks a young chef as a rising culinary young gun. Now meet Louisville’s Chef Ming Pu, 29-year-old executive chef at The 502 Bar & Bistro: This … Continue reading The 502 Bar & Bistro, a jewel in Norton Commons

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Stand Up and Paddle Board at Endless Summer July 10 Wednesday, Jul 10 2019 

The Ohio River has always been a main feature of Louisville. The historic Belle of Louisville and other paddle boats have moved along its waves, and it’s the reason Louisville was built where it is today. Go spend some time on the river and go do some Stand Up Paddle Board at Endless Summer this July. Community Paddle The community paddle event is an opportunity for people of all ages to come together and paddle. Enjoy the gentle waves of the river and the gorgeous scenery of downtown Louisville while you paddle along. Paddle Board at Endless Summer You don’t need to bring anything. All the paddles, boards and life jackets are provided. Just wear clothes that can get wet, because you are going to be on the river. This community paddle event is early enough to give you a look at the sunrise. Be at the river from 6:30 to 7:30 am to enjoy the beautiful, early morning light. Meet up with the group at 1301 Frankfort Avenue. That’s just a few blocks outside of Clifton, a community that’s so diverse and so beautiful, being here is like being at a huge museum of architecture. Being here may also make you want to live here. Clifton tends to have that effect. The Clifton Community Clifton spreads out on both sides of Frankfort Avenue, a road where you can find some of the best eating and nightlife in Louisville. The Clifton neighborhood has a lot to offer, from restaurants to parks to museums to historic homes to modern, glittering condos. The housing here literally spans a century of design, from late Victorian to totally modern condos. Clifton is just minutes from downtown Louisville, but it looks almost suburban. There's lots of landscaping and green lawns here and lots of cozy, cute homes in bungalow styles. There's lots to love about Clifton. Find your reasons when you’re here this July. About the Author:  Joe Hayden is the Team Owner and Manager of the Joe Hayden Real Estate Team - !