Exhibit dedicated to Breonna Taylor opens at the speed Art Museum Monday, Apr 19 2021 

By Tate Luckey

A  new exhibit at the Speed Art Museum, called “Promise, Witness, Remembrance,” reflects on the life of Breonna Taylor and the resulting protests around Louisville and the world. Taylor was killed in her home by Louisville Metro police officers in March of last year.

The exhibit features work curated by Allison Glenn, a contemporary art curator, and seeks to explore the nation’s “reflection on the promise, witness, and remembrance of too many black lives lost to gun violence.”

The section “Promise” explores the ideologies of the US, while “Witness” addresses the moments and finally, “Remembrance,” which reflects on the legacies of those affected.

The exhibit is available now until June 6 and is free to U of L students. More information about the exhibit can be found here.


Photos by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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”Fashioning Art from Paper”: A peek at Isabelle de Borchgrave’s Speed Art Museum exhibit Wednesday, Mar 17 2021 

By Grace Welsh

From now until Aug. 22, the Speed Art Museum will host the world-renowned work of Isabelle de Borchgrave. The Belgian artist’s work consists of life-size paper costumes representing five centuries of fashion history. The exhibit, like all exhibits at the Speed Art Museum, is free to all current University of Louisville students.

Born in Belgium in 1946, Borchgrave seemed to come into the world with a passion for art. She famously said once that, “The same day that I could walk for the first time, I picked up a piece of paper, started to draw, and I have not been able to quit since then.”

She was classically trained at Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels and opened her own studio by the time she was 18.

Borchgrave filled her life with pretty and inspirational things. Opening a store in 1975, called La Tour de Bebelle, she sold dresses, paintings and home décor.

Over the years, she took a liking to the craft of paper maché and was struck by inspiration after visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute in 1994. Combining her wisdom and expertise with that of Rita Brown, Borchgrave assembled her first series, “Papiers à la Mode,” which caught the eye of curators of prestigious institutions around the world.

Borchgrave’s superpower is more than just fashioning the outfits themselves. The artist utilizes an elusive trick of the eye called “trompe l’oeil,” which tricks the museum-goer into thinking they are looking at real fabrics, carefully assembled into extravagant outfits by the artist, but they are really an intricate take on paper maché.

The exhibit, titled, “Fashioning Art From Paper,” is divided into five major collections.

 

“Papiers à la Mode”

This is the largest and earliest showcase of centuries of fashion across cultures. From royal English and French gowns to traditional Victorian wear to chic streetwear, the exhibit takes the viewer from the Renaissance to the early 1900s with the magic of color, patterns, texture and beauty.

“Splendor of the Medici” and “The World of Mariano Fortuny”

Immersing visitors into the streets of Italy, this piece tells the story of the Italian Renaissance with inspiration from portraits of the Medici family and artist Mariano Fortuny. Borchgrave’s pieces reveal her unique interpretation of their art and colors and guide the viewer to experience the atmosphere of her work in the way she intended.

“Les Ballets Russes”

This most recent addition to the exhibit showcases costumes, outfits and drawings of twentieth-century Russian dancers that Borchgrave feels revolutionized modern art upon their entrance into the 1908 Paris art scene. Borchgrave breathes life into their stories and through her careful use of color and texture, allows them to live again and be seen by twenty-first century observers.

“Kaftans”

Inspired by her trip to Istanbul, this section of her exhibit showcases an appreciation for central Asian textiles.

Having a life-long fascination with the Silk Road, an ancient transcontinental trade route that connected Eastern Asia to Europe, Borchgrave worked in collaboration with artist Saeed Sadraee to highlight this ethnically and culturally diverse region that was a center for artisanal textile production. The textiles she selected, or “Kaftans,” illustrate the relationship between the nomadic people of Central Asia’s natural and cultural world.

 

The Speed Art Museum is free for U of L students and faculty and will be showcasing this impressive exhibit until August 22, 2021. For information on how you can reserve tickets, click here.

Photos by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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Speed Art Museum features new exhibits for Spring 2021 Thursday, Feb 4 2021 

By Maria Dinh —

The Speed Art Museum is now open during its regular hours. Visitors must wear a face mask and practice social distancing. As always, University of Louisville students can go in for free by showing their cardinal card. Here’s what’s coming up at the Speed in these next couple of months:

Featured Exhibits

The Speed Art Museum said goodbye to the Andy Warhol: Revelation exhibit last November to make way for their next featured exhibit: Collecting – A Love Story: Glass from the Adele and Leonard Leight Collection. Coming February 6th, 2021, Leight’s art collection will contain many contemporary glasswork pieces that the couple had collected during their marriage.

From February 19 – August 22, a fashion exhibit inspired by early works of 18th and 19th-century art will be coming to the Speed, titled “Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Art from Paper.” Look closely to observe the intricacies and details of the painted paper dresses.

“I am really enthralled by the artist’s use of color, so I’ve found myself drawn to the Mariano Fortuny dresses she has recreated – there are beautiful, unusual color combinations that are so inspiring,” Erika Holquist-Wall, curator of European & American Painting & Sculpture, said about the exhibit.

“I think visitors are going to leave this exhibition inspired by possibility – whether that is the inspiration to create their own artwork, play with paper, or just take a closer look at the artwork in the rest of the museum and appreciate the effort and creativity it requires to make something.”

Speed Online

Visitors can still have a quick “scroll” around the Speed from home with Museum from Home on their website for free. For the inner child that misses going downstairs at the Speed to play at the Art Sparks room, the website has downloadable .pdfs of coloring pages, crafts, and games to play at home.

Freshman Eleanor Ferguson has already visited the museum in person. She talked about how visitors are socially distant from others when viewing the art; “I’d say the majority of it [the museum] was safe, but there were a couple of rooms with too many people for me to be comfortable in, so I dragged my date out till they left. Everyone wore masks though.”

After Hours at the Speed

In a COVID-19 free world, the Speed would host a monthly event on the third Friday with performers, food and drinks and family fun. After Hours at the Speed will continue being held virtually every third Friday of the month until further notice. Check out their Facebook page to see who will perform and watch on their Facebook Live.

Photo Courtesy // Speed Art Museum 

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Andy Warhol exhibit gives look into pop artist’s influences Monday, Sep 14 2020 

By Kyla Thomas  —

An art exhibit on pop artist Andy Warhol is on display at the Speed Art Museum until Nov. 29–and it’s free for University of Louisville students. 

Warhol is best known for his work designing the Campbell’s soup logo and his pop art of Marilyn Monroe. “Andy Warhol: Revelation” highlights a new side of Warhol’s career, focusing more on his religious pieces and the story behind not only the art, but how the art correlates to Warhol himself.

The exhibit opens with a biography of Warhol, which talks about his sexuality as a gay man and how he managed to balance that part of himself while growing up in a religious community. Plaques at the museum said that “he made a point of regularly popping into his local parish to pray even if it was only for five or ten minutes.” Although he was deeply involved in a religion that condemned his sexuality, Warhol remained openly gay, and was a fixture in New York’s Queer underground. 

Many of Warhol’s pieces on display lie in this balance too, such as his recreation of Raphael Madonna. Warhol would take religious works of art and recreate it in his own unique style, he did this with “The Last Supper,” and a portrait of Jesus as well. 


SEE: Photo Gallery of the “Andy Warhol: Revelation” exhibit by Cardinal photo editor Anthony Riley. 


Through his art he showed two sides of his identity that came together to create the person he was, and through those pieces he showed that you can be both. 

Brady Alexander, a senior English major, said he enjoyed Warhol’s embracing of contradictions within his own identity.

“I love how [the art] highlighted that you have the ability to be both, you can still be true to yourself without having to give up something that gives you faith that things can be better,” Alexander said.

The exhibit doesn’t just focus on Warhol’s personal life, it also showed his love for women. Throughout the exhibit you can find portraits of women who he saw as powerful, such his mother and Jackie Kennedy. One photo shows a mother breastfeeding, as Warhol wanted to show how women not only gave birth to everything, but they nurture everything as well.

“I took my boyfriend here as a date, because we both liked [Warhol’s] pop art that we would periodically see,” Victoria Johnson, a political science major, said. “After going through the exhibit, we saw a different side of an artist that we loved but didn’t truly know the history behind. Now that we know, it’s like we love his art even more.” 

The “Andy Warhol: Revelation” exhibit will remain at the Speed Art Museum until Nov. 29. Due to COVID-19, hours are limited to only Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. More information and tickets reservations can be made on the Speed Art Museum’s website

Graphic by Alexis Simon // The Louisville Cardinal

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Photo Gallery: “Andy Warhol: Revelation” exhibit at the Speed Art Museum Monday, Sep 14 2020 

 

 

 

Photos by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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Speed Art Museum Director To Step Down In Spring 2021 Wednesday, Sep 2 2020 

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The director of the Speed Art Museum will leave early next year.

Director Stephen Reily will end his tenure with the museum in Spring 2021 after a successor “has been identified and successfully onboarded with the organization, according to a  press release sent out Wednesday.

In the release, Reily said he has achieved a number of “milestones” he had set for himself as director. 


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Philanthropist tests positive for the coronavirus after attending a Speed Art Museum fundraiser Monday, Mar 16 2020 

By Eli Hughes–

A Louisville philanthropist has tested positive for COVID-19 March 13 after attending a Speed Art Museum fundraiser, and possibly came into contact with several Kentucky politicians and the University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi.

The philanthropist, who has been identified as Christy Brown, started experiencing symptoms March 8, the day after she attended the Speed Ball.

The symptoms were not those typically associated with COVID-19, so she was not tested until March 12. She is currently reported to be in stable condition and in self-isolation. Brown is one of the 21 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Kentucky.

Besides Bendapudi, Gov. Andy Beshear, Mayor Greg Fischer, Metro Council President David James, Sen. Rand Paul and Rep. John Yarmuth were all in attendance at the fundraiser.

Beshear announced at a press conference on March 15 that he has tested negative for COVID-19. He went on to say that he would be continuing to work and manage this outbreak.

“I will still be here, each and every day, making sure that I do what I need to do to help get us through this,” Beshear said.

Bendapudi announced in a Facebook post March 15 that she is currently not experiencing any symptoms, but she is still self-isolating.

“It is always an honor to lead U of L and for now I will be doing so remotely,” Bendapudi said. “The health and safety of our cardinal community is my number one priority.”

Fischer and Yarmuth are reportedly waiting for their test results in self-isolation.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

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The Speed Art Museum stayed busy over winter-break Wednesday, Jan 8 2020 

By Zoe Watkins —

Though many buildings on campus closed over winter break, a few still operated during those weeks.

The Speed Art Museum’s usual After Hours at the Speed happened Dec. 13. This event takes place on the third Friday of every month where the museum stays open until 10 p.m. During these hours, guests get to explore their permanent collection along with visiting exhibitions.

However, the fun part of the night belongs to the ranging music with the many unique performances. Guests can also dine on food provided by the Wiltshire Café.

Each After Hours at the Speed is unique in its own way with the next one being Jan. 17.

Admission is 20 dollars though U of L students get in for free.

One of their regular workshops, “Adult Workshop Back to Basics: Gold Leafing,” took place on Dec. 14. Participants learned about the process of art restoration and learned how to use faux gold-leaf with different techniques. People either got to bring a small wooden object from home to work with or create a new golden picture frame.

Besides workshops, there have also been a few films that passed through the cinema. A major one that left Dec. 29 was the 21st Annual Animation Show of Shows. Various students and professionals from around the world showcased their animated short films. “The Fox and the Bird” by Sam and Fred Guillaume and “Kids” by Michael Frei and Mario von Rickenbach were two of the short films.

The exhibition “Loose Nuts: Bert Hurley’s West End Story” features the work of Louisville native and African-American artist Bert Hurley.  It primarily focuses on her novella “Loose Nuts: A Rapsody in Brown” which contains over 125 pages that are colorfully illustrated and handwritten, covering a range of media from crayon to ink wash.

Another exhibition is “Tales from the Turf: The Kentucky Horse” which holds many differing paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints and manuscripts from all different creators. It tells the story of the relationship between the horse and Kentucky that is often seen throughout the state from its identity to the bluegrass state’s historical roots.

There is still more to come to the Speed where pieces from famous painter Andy Warhol will be present in the exhibition “Andy Warhol: Revelation” that will be coming April 3.  It will focus on Warhol’s relationship with his catholic faith and how it has been mixed in with his artwork.  The 100 pieces that come from the collection at The Andy Warhol Museum will be staying at the museum until August 21.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Go gonzo Saturday at the Louisville Free Public Library with GonzoFest No. 9 Tuesday, Jul 16 2019 

Detail of art by Grant Goodwine

Earlier this spring, 2019 was declared “The Year of Gonzo” in Louisville, as three exhibitions dedicated to hometown hero Hunter S. Thompson are being held at different venues throughout the year. Now, the celebrations are culminating in one afternoon at one easily accessible venue as the ninth annual GonzoFest takes over the Louisville Free Public […]