“I could not be more excited to be joining you today,”- former Towson University president Dr. Kim Schatzel begins first day as U of L president Thursday, Feb 2 2023 

By Joe Wilson 

February 1st marks a change not only in Grawemeyer Hall but across campus as Dr. Kim Schatzel began her first day as the 19th president of the University of Louisville.

The U of L Board of Trustees first announced Schatzel’s appointment in November 2022, concluding a nearly year-long search for a permanent president after the departure of Neeli Bendapudi in December 2021.

Dr. Lori Stewart Gonzales served as the University’s interim president since Bendapudi’s departure. She now returns to her role as Executive Vice President and University Provost.

Keeping her eyes and ears opening

“I could not be more excited to be joining you today,” Schatzel said in her first public statement since assuming her new role. “I look forward to meeting with each of you in the days, months, and yes, even years to come as we support each other and work together toward U of L’s very bright future.”

Schatzel plans to hold a listening tour later this month to gather input from the university’s students, staff, and faculty. Schatzel will hold the first listening session on February 8th at the Student Activities Center (SAC). Students from the Belknap campus are invited to register for the event on the president’s website. Additional listening tour dates are planned for staff and faculty later this month

Prior to her arrival at U of L, Schatzel was president of Towson University. She also previously served as provost of Eastern Michigan University, and Dean of the College of Business at the University of Michigan-Dearborn.

In the coming months, this article will be updated with information related to the initial weeks of her tenure, as well as details of her listening tour. 

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal //

The post “I could not be more excited to be joining you today,”- former Towson University president Dr. Kim Schatzel begins first day as U of L president appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

57 students file for upcoming Student Government Association elections Thursday, Feb 2 2023 

By Joe Wilson 

As of February 1st, the University of Louisville has published the full list of students campaigning for Student Government Association (SGA) offices. The election will be held from February 27th – March 2nd, 2023 via your student email.

The full list of candidates, posted on the university’s website, includes students running for the Top 4 — that is, Student Body President, Executive Vice President, Academic Vice President, Services Vice President — and the Student Senate.

The Top 4

The Executive Branch of the SGA is made up of four officers: Student Body President, Executive Vice President, Academic Vice President and Services Vice President. Dubbed the “Top 4” of SGA, the members of the Executive Cabinet are tasked with implementing policies passed by the Student Senate.

Three students have filed to run for Student Body President. The president sits on the Board of Trustees and serves as a liaison to the university’s administration. The following students are vying for the positions:

  • Paighton Brooks (2022-2023 SGA Deputy Chief of Staff)
  • Liam Gallagher  (2022-2023 President of the College of Arts and Sciences) 
  • Katie Hayden (2022-2023 Executive Vice President)

The Executive Vice President is the second-highest post in the executive branch. Serving as the President of the Student Senate, this officer keeps records of the Executive Branch and helps organize Student Senate meetings. These students are competing for this position:

  • Angel (Nkechinyere) Okorie (2022-2023 ELSB Equality and Justice Committee Co-director)
  • Daniel Ngongo (2022-2023 Student Senators for the College of Arts and Sciences)
  • Bryson Sebastian (2022-2023 Academic Vice President)

The Academic Vice President acts as the chief officer who implements academic policy passed by the Student Senate. Additionally, the Academic Vice President sits on the Faculty Senate. Two students are running for Academic Vice President:

  • Sawyer Depp (2022-2023 SGA Chief of Staff)
  • Caroline Thomas (2022-2023 President of the College of Business)

Finally, the Services Vice President administers all service policies passed by the Student Senate. This officer also sits on the Staff Senate. Running unopposed, one student has filed their candidacy for Services Vice President:

  • Alex Reynolds (2022-2023 Services Vice President)

College President and Vice President

The following students are campaigning to serve as their respective college’s President.

  • Rebekah Flowers, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Alexis Mowen, College of Business
  • Cooper Yancey, College of Business
  • Katie Caruthers, School of Public Health and Information Sciences
  • Madison Roy, School of Public Health and Information Sciences
  • Griffin Gould, Speed School of Engineering
  • Stephanie Lawson, School of Music
  • Lexy Crockett, Kent School of Social Work
  • Parker Anderson, School of Nursing
  • Valencia Brown, School of Nursing
  • Sean Ryan Pendergest, College of Education and Human Development

These students are running to serve as their college’s Vice President:

  • Kaleb Speed, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Miles Parker, College of Business
  • Yelena Bagdasaryan, School of Public Health and Information Sciences
  • Amelia Coomes, Speed School of Engineering
  • Kayla Lancaster, Speed School of Engineering
  • Bethany Faris Whitley, School of Music

Student Senate

Twenty-three students filed to run for the Student Senate, representing the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business, and the School of Public Health and Information Sciences:

  • Macon Adkins, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Dakota Allen, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Grant Avis, College of Arts and Sciences
  • John Davies, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Addison Dierig, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Shelby Disney, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Daniel Fagan, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Jeremy Faulhaber, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Anna Hernandez, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Eric Miracle, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Morrigan McIntosh, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Colin McQuarrie, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Daniel Pica, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Andrew Roberts, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Donald Seibert, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Jacob Stallons, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Mikaella Tanales, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Spencer Adkins, College of Business
  • Donovan Marcum, College of Business
  • Dorrah Martin, College of Business
  • Ryan Leigeb, College of Business
  • Ankita Kashyab, School of Public Health and Information Sciences
  • Jayden Rogers, School of Nursing

For more updates on the 2023 election, you can click here. To learn more about the SGA as a whole, you can visit their site here.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal //

The post 57 students file for upcoming Student Government Association elections appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

U of L names Kim Schatzel as next president Wednesday, Nov 30 2022 

By Joe Wilson 

On Nov. 30, U of L named Kim Schatzel to serve as the university’s next president. She will assume the role on Feb. 1, 2023.

The Board of Trustees held a news conference at 11 a.m. after it voted unanimously to appoint Schatzel to the position.

Schatzel has served as the president of Towson University since 2016. Before that, Schatzel has served as provost of Eastern Michigan University and dean of the College of Business at the University of Michigan-Dearborn.

Commenting on her appointment, Schatzel said: “The University of Louisville is a historic university with rich traditions that provides leadership to Kentucky as the premier metropolitan research university for the Commonwealth. I am incredibly honored to be chosen to lead such a remarkable institution and look forward to working together with our campus and community parters to advance U of L’s reputation as a preeminent institution nationally recognized for its excellence in research and scholarly work, education, inclusive student success, innovation, the arts and athletics—all aimed to establish the University of Louisville and the City of Louisville as a nexus for transformative solutions that advance the public good.”

The search for a new president began in December 2021, when Neeli Bendapudi left U of L to serve as the president of Penn State University. Since her departure, Lori Stewart Gonzalez has served as U of L’s interim president. Gonzalez plans to return to her position as executive vice president and university provost.

Since then, the presidential search committee has been meeting privately to discuss potential candidates to lead the university in the future. The search committee partnered with Wittkeiffer, an outside leadership advisory company, to compile a list of qualified candidates.

Mary Nixon, the U of L Board of Trustees Chair, spoke about the announcement: “Dr. Schatzel brings the best of many worlds to the U of L community. Her impressive climb through the academic ranks, as well as her extensive experience both in the business community and in health care, make her uniquely qualified to lead the university into our next chapter as Kentucky’s premier metropolitan research university.”

Schatzel will be the university’s 19th president.

This is a breaking news story. It will be updated as information becomes available. 

The post U of L names Kim Schatzel as next president appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Brown and Hayden, rest of Top 4 hope to Revitalize Student Community Sunday, Sep 4 2022 

By Joe Wilson —

Excitement, community, and potential. These are just some of the words that the the top 4 officers of the Student Government Association (SGA) use to describe the upcoming school year.

Earlier this week, Dorian Brown and Katie Hayden spoke with The Louisville Cardinal about their new roles as SGA’s Student Body President and Executive Vice President, respectively. 

Prior to Their Positions

Both Brown and Hayden were elected to their posts in Spring 2022, after a tumultuous election cycle that involved months-long lawsuits and a run-off election. Reflecting on the election, Brown recalls being caught off guard by the contentious end of the campaign. “When it got deeper into the process, it kind of fueled my fire to want to be a person that can make changes in the future so that this situation doesn’t happen again in the upcoming years,” he said.

Speaking about the election, Hayden adds, “It was really hard. I would say there are a lot of different factors playing into the election. At the end of the day, we were very happy that it turned out how it did.”

What’s in Store For The Top 4

Shifting the conversation away from the past, both Brown and Hayden expressed optimism about the future on campus, including a wish to revitalize U of L’s student community after the university decided to ease most of its COVID-19 restrictions from the previous two years. In August, the university announced it would no longer require students, faculty, and staff to wear masks indoors. 

Hayden noted the improvement in student morale after the mask policy change. “It’s kind of funny, because you see people around campus that you’ve known for years, and they look completely different because you’ve been looking at them under a mask, so we’re excited to get a lot more face-to-face interaction this year.”

Ultimately, Hayden explains, the changes to the mask policy were made in consideration of public health guidelines and students’ mental health. “We talked about a lot of different factors that played into it, whether the mental health aspect of wearing a mask, the depression rates,” she explained.

Brown adds that the university continues to monitor COVID-19 cases on campus and will update the masking policy as needed. “We’re still going to track the COVID positive rates and base our next decisions on those.” Above all, Brown emphasized his goal to give students a typical college experience.

Looking Towards a Safer Future

In addition to the COVID-19 pandemic, Brown and Hayden see campus security as a top priority in their administration. Hayden explains, “We’ve been working very closely with U of L PD to ensure we’re being extremely transparent in our measures. The university has put a lot of money into safety measures across the board.”

Reflecting on the other challenges the U of L community faces, Brown remains hopeful for the future. “We don’t know what’s in store for this year, but we have a lot of potential to have one of the best years the university has seen so far.”

To learn more about the SGA, you can do so here. You can follow them on Instagram here.

File Photo // U of L SGA //

The post Brown and Hayden, rest of Top 4 hope to Revitalize Student Community appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Board of Trustees Approves FY 2023 Operating Budget Saturday, Jun 25 2022 

By Joe Wilson —

The U of L Board of Trustees approved the operating budget for the Fiscal Year 2023 on June 23.

On July 1, the operating budget will be $1,521,853,578, the largest budget in the university’s history. The latest budget is $186 million larger than last year’s. In addition, the university expects revenues for the Fiscal Year 2023 to total $1,490,267,918. The university has presented a balanced budget along with $31,585,660 of unused funds from the prior year.

The budget outlines three main priorities for the upcoming fiscal year: investing in students, employees, and the university’s infrastructure.

For students, the university plans to create the Cardinal Commitment program to pay full tuition for many Pell-eligible students. In addition, the budget includes an increase in graduate student stipends totaling $600,000.

For university employees, the budget includes a cost-of-living salary increase of 2.5 percent for faculty and staff and a starting minimum wage of $14.75 for full-and part-time staff. The budget also notes the university hopes to increase the minimum wage further to $15 per hour by early 2023.

The budget also allocates funds to improve the university’s physical infrastructure, website, and brand marketing campaign.

Writing to the Board of Trustees, U of L Interim President Lori Gonzalez says: “Our proposed budget is mathematically balanced. It ensures that our efforts over the past few years to develop a solid and predictable financial base continue, even in the face of the many challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic brought us. This budget also underscores the commitment to be responsible stewards of our funds.”

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal //

The post Board of Trustees Approves FY 2023 Operating Budget appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Interim President Lori Gonzalez optimistic about U of L’s future Wednesday, May 11 2022 

By Madelin Shelton — 

At the conclusion of the Spring semester, Interim President Lori Stewart Gonzalez spoke with The Louisville Cardinal about her role so far and where she would like to see U of L go during her tenure.

Gonzalez came to U of L in April 2021 as the new executive vice president and university provost. Following the departure of former U of L President Neeli Bendapudi in December 2021, Gonzalez was appointed by the Board of Trustees as the acting interim university president.

Gonzalez says the biggest challenge for U of L is the numerous transitions the university has endured over the last decade. She said Bendapudi’s departure added another transition U of L had to go through. “I’ve been trying to hold it steady and do everything and be out there so people know that somebody’s watching what’s going on, but I think all the transitions are difficult for our campus.”

Despite these difficulties, Gonzalez highlighted what U of L has been able to accomplish following her appointment. “One of the things I’m most proud of for our employees has been that we’re able to provide a one percent raise in March,” she said. “That’s good because we need to invest in our most prized resource, which is our people.” Gonzalez also commended the way the university was able to smoothly return to in-person instruction.

Looking forward, one thing Gonzalez is focused on addressing is student success. She said U of L’s current graduation rate is 60.4 percent and she would like to see that number go up. “That will mean providing services for students who need them.”

Specifically, Gonzalez mentioned potentially expanding REACH and hiring more academic advisors. Gonzalez said there is currently a committee that is assessing how U of L can improve student success and it will provide recommendations in June.

She also wants to focus on communicating what makes U of L distinct. “We have interesting programs, we have our focus on research, and we need to share that with our community and with the larger higher education community and, frankly, nationally. I don’t think we’ve communicated our distinctiveness well,” she said.

The last major value Gonzalez would like to advance during her tenure is financial sustainability. Part of that, she said, includes routinely rewarding employees and keeping tuition as low as possible while still meeting the university’s financial needs.

Overall, Gonzalez sees higher education as a transformational experience and U of L is no different. “When I listen to students and alumni and hear the passion of this place, I know it is a transformational experience for people and it goes on after graduation,” she said.

Gonzalez also noted her optimism for U of L going forward. “Our budget is stronger, we had the best year in our General Assembly, we got tons of support from our legislators and the governor’s office, our enrollment is looking strong for the fall, so the state of U of L is strong and I’m very optimistic and excited about the future.”

Photo Courtesy // U of L News

The post Interim President Lori Gonzalez optimistic about U of L’s future appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Brown and Sebastian win SGA run-off elections Wednesday, Apr 27 2022 

By Joe Wilson —

Dorian Brown and Bryson Sebastian have won their races for president and academic vice president in the Student Government Association (SGA) run-off elections.

According to unofficial results obtained by The Louisville Cardinal, the race for student body president ended with Brown in first with 1,166 votes to Sydney Finley’s 716, creating a margin of 500 votes.

The results for academic vice president are much slimmer. Those show Sebastian coming in first with 908 votes to Kendall Tubbs’ 897, creating a margin of just 11 votes.

The unofficial results also contain the overall turn-out rate for the latest run-off election. Out of the 20,115 students who were eligible to vote, only 1,908 students submitted ballots. This creates a turn-out rate of 9.47 percent.

The results were scheduled to be announced on April 26, but SGA has yet to release the run-off results on its website or social media pages.

According to the SGA website, candidates will have until April 28 to file lawsuits to challenge the results.

The post Brown and Sebastian win SGA run-off elections appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

SGA holds run-off elections following student backlash Saturday, Apr 23 2022 

By Joe Wilson — 

Run-off elections for Student Government Association (SGA) have begun. Voting opened April 21 at 12 a.m. and will run through April 24 at 12 a.m. The ballot was sent to all students via email. 

On the ballot, students will be able to vote for candidates running for student body president and academic vice president. 

The election for student body president will be between candidates Sydney Finley and Dorian Brown. The run-off comes weeks after the SGA Supreme Court handed down a controversial decision that changed the unofficial results of the election. In the first round of voting, which took place March 7-9, the unofficial results showed Brown in first with 844 votes and Finley in second with 791 votes. However, after post-election lawsuits that alleged campaign rule violations, the Court implemented a three percent vote sanction per alleged violation that reduced Brown’s vote total to 421 and Finley’s to 670. The Court did not change its initial decision, but chose to move the election to a run-off following the significant backlash from the student body. 

The run-off for academic vice president will be between candidates Bryson Sebastian and Kendall Tubbs. In the first round of voting, Sebastian came in first with 579 votes and Tubbs came in second with 535 votes. With neither candidate receiving the 40 percent plurality threshold mandated by the SGA General Election Rules, the race automatically moved to a run-off.

There was also a run-off planned for the position of executive vice president that was set to be between Katie Hayden and Valerie Tran. However, Tran has since announced that she did not want the position, leaving Hayden as the next executive vice president. 

After the unofficial results are tallied on April 25, campaigns will have until April 28 to file any lawsuits regarding the election results.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

The post SGA holds run-off elections following student backlash appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

SGA Supreme Court moves student body president election to run-off Friday, Apr 15 2022 

By Madelin Shelton — 

The SGA Supreme Court has handed down a new decision relating to the controversy surrounding this year’s SGA elections. The opinion declares that the election for student body president will move to a run-off.

The decision read in part, “Upon deliberation and consideration of the Petition, the Court stands with this prior decision and will not reverse/reduce/reconsider/etc the sanctions delivered. However, the Court recognizes the unprecedented waters in which this suit has transfigured. We hear the convictions of the Student Body and acknowledge their frustrations. Taking all things into consideration, the Court is allowing a run-off election for Student Body President to take place (alongside the EVP and AVP run-offs that have been postponed). This run-off election will be limited to Dorian Brown and Sydney Finley.”

This opinion was handed down in response to a Petition to Reconsider filed by the Brown/Hayden ticket. The petition asked the Court to throw out its controversial April 8 decision that overturned the results for the student body president election and declared that the race for executive vice president would move to a run-off. The petition alleged several claims that the Supreme Court acted inappropriately during the election-related hearings, resulting in an unfair process for Brown/Hayden. SGA Supreme Court Chief Justice Jacquelyn Gesser was involved in the original decision as a non-voting member, but recused herself following the filing of the Petition to Reconsider.

For student body president, the unofficial results originally had Dorian Brown in first with 844 votes, Sydney Finley in second with 791 votes and Afi Tagnedji in third with 380 votes. The unofficial results for executive vice president has Katie Hayden in first with 856 votes, Valerie Tran in second with 497 votes, Paighton Brooks in third with 460 votes and Makayla Streater in fourth with 162 votes.

Following an election lawsuit filed by the Finley/Brooks ticket against the Brown/Hayden ticket and election-related hearings held by the SGA Supreme Court, the Court’s April 8 decision resulted in election violation sanctions against both parties in the suit. The Court’s sanctions included a three percent deduction in each candidate’s original vote total for every alleged violation of the SGA General Election Rules (SGAGER). These sanctions resulted in Brown’s vote total being reduced to 421 votes and Finley’s to 670, declaring Finley the next student body president-elect.

For executive vice president, the sanctions against Hayden reduced her original vote total to 441 votes and Brooks’ to 341. Tran and Streater’s vote totals remained unchanged, placing Tran in first with 497. However, the new vote totals resulted in no candidate achieving the required 40 percent voting plurality as required by the SGAGER. This automatically moved the race to a run-off election between the top two vote getters, Hayden and Tran. The Court’s newest opinion leaves the status of this election unchanged.

Finley and Liam Gallagher, a sophomore political science student who acted as the counsel for Brown/Hayden during the election hearings, did not respond to a request for comment about the Court’s latest decision.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal 

The post SGA Supreme Court moves student body president election to run-off appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

SGA Supreme Court Chief Justice recuses herself from upcoming decision Thursday, Apr 14 2022 

By Madelin Shelton and Joe Wilson — 

SGA Supreme Court Chief Justice Jacquelyn Gesser has recused herself from the Finley/Brooks v. Brown/Hayden election lawsuit ahead of the Court’s anticipated decision. According to an email obtained by The Louisville Cardinal, the Court will be handing down an opinion later this week in response to a Petition to Reconsider filed by the Brown/Hayden ticket.

Liam Gallagher, a sophomore U of L student who is acting as the counsel for Brown/Hayden during the proceedings, issued a statement in response to Gesser’s decision to recuse. “We are glad that she will not be ruling on our current case, but it is sad that we had to wait until after I submitted a request to force her to recuse herself that she actually did it. She should have known to do it in the first place.”

The Petition to Reconsider asked the Court to throw out its April 8 decision that overturned the unofficial results for SGA student body president and moved the executive vice president election to a run-off.

Originally, Dorian Brown finished first in the race for student body president with 844 votes, Sydney Finley finished second with 791 votes and Afi Tagnedji finished third with 380 votes. Following a lawsuit and election hearings held by the SGA Supreme Court, it issued election violation sanctions that deducted three percent from an individual’s vote count for each alleged violation of the SGA General Election Rules. This action changed Finley’s vote count to 670 and Brown’s to 421, making Finley the presumed student body president-elect. Tagnedji’s vote total did not change.

These sanctions also resulted in a deduction of executive vice president candidate Katie Hayden’s first place finish from 856 votes to 441 votes. Third place finisher Paighton Brooks was also deducted from 460 votes to 341. Valerie Tran’s vote total remained the same at 497. This deduction technically placed Tran in the first place spot, but no candidate with the new totals achieved a 40 percent plurality, forcing the election to a run-off per the SGA General Election Rules.

The Brown/Hayden’s petition lists several claims that the Court acted inappropriately in reaching their original decision. The claims include:

  • The Court gave Brown/Hayden two days to prepare for the pretrial conference and oral argument. The SGA Constitution requires 14 days notice for respondents to appear before the Court. 
  • The Court failed to keep a file of previous court decisions, hindering Brown/Hayden’s ability to cite relevant precedent in oral argument.
  • The Court used outside evidence that was not presented by the Finley/Brooks ticket during the election hearings for five of the seven election violations sanctioned against Brown/Hayden.
  • The Court violated the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution by punishing Brown/Hayden for receiving endorsements from people representing private organizations. SGA is bound to follow the U.S. Constitution by Section 1.2 of the SGA Constitution.

Uproar relating to the Court’s original decision intensified after the Louisville Political Review, an undergraduate-run online magazine, published an article that alleged corruption among the current SGA Top 4 and the Supreme Court.

Gesser’s recusal comes after the Louisville Political Review published a separate article with screenshots of text messages sent to academic vice president candidate Julia Mattingly. The Louisville Political Review alleged that Gesser and current academic vice president Alexa Meza worked together to remove votes from candidate Kendall Tubbs in order to move the academic vice president election to a run-off.

The allegations of corruption surrounding the academic vice president run-off elections prompted a separate announcement from SGA Supreme Court Associate Justice Jacob Frakes. In an email sent to the academic vice president candidates, Frakes wrote: “Justices Bhutto, Atkins, Gupta, Lamar, and I have decided to delay this run-off for the time being. Taking into consideration the current state of the student body, we think this decision is for the best. I can assure you we are working diligently and will certainly have more information by the weeks end.”

According to Gallagher, the Brown/Hayden ticket also questioned Gesser’s involvement in the lawsuit because of her close friendship with current SGA Student Body President Ugonna Okorie, who acted as an eyewitness for Finley/Brooks. 

In prior communications with The Louisville Cardinal, Gesser indicated that the chief justice serves as a non-voting member of the Court.

In addition to the Court’s forthcoming decision, a special meeting of the SGA Student Senate to address the controversy is planned for Apr. 15 at the PNC Horn Auditorium in the College of Business. The meeting is open to the entire student body. 

Finley and the SGA Supreme Court did not respond to a request for comment. 

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

The post SGA Supreme Court Chief Justice recuses herself from upcoming decision appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Next Page »