U of L Police Department and SGA Promote Campus Safety at Cookout Thursday, Oct 13 2022 

By Joe Wilson and Tate Luckey —

Burgers from the ULPD cookout on October 12th.

On Oct. 12, the University of Louisville Police Department (ULPD) partnered with the Student Government Association (SGA) to host a cookout outside the Bingham Humanities Building to promote campus safety.

“With campus safety being a big focus of our administration this year, and with it being a big priority on students’ lists overall, we thought an event like this to give students a chance to really meet ULPD officers, get to know them on a personal level—make it so they’re not just the figment behind the blue and red lights, make to where they’re actual people on campus that care about our students,” Academic Vice President Bryson Sebastian said. 

With an array of hot dogs, hamburgers, snacks, and desserts, ULPD officers greeted students, staff, and faculty. Fliers containing information such as the latest crime reports and campus safety resources were handed out to educate the community.

During the cookout, Chief of Police Steven Green sat down with The Louisville Cardinal to talk about ULPD’s partnership with SGA and the most pressing security concerns on campus.

Students and staff wait to receive food during the ULPD cookout.

ULPD K-9 Unit available for students to hug.

The biggest emphasis was the importance of ULPD’s partnership with SGA. “We’re here for the safety of the students, faculty, and staff, and reaching out to them [SGA], they’re just a conduit for our message and putting that message out. It’s just been a great relationship so far,” he said. Green noted the collaboration between ULPD and SGA is the closest he has seen in the 11 years he has worked for ULPD.

When asked about his concerns in terms of campus safety, Green said: “Theft is always a problem here, bicycle theft, and things like that.” Green, however, also expressed optimism about the direction of campus safety. “I’m pretty happy with where we’re at, to be honest with you. I think we’re in a very safe community right now compared to what’s going on around us.” 

File Photos // The Louisville Cardinal //

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New University “Free Store” aims to combine convenience with sustainability Thursday, Nov 11 2021 

By Tate Luckey —

Following up from the University of Louisville’s “Sustainability Week,” which featured activities and groups all across campus promoting sustainable practices and workshops, a new pop-up shop is now a permanent addition to campus: The U of L “Free Store.” Open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the SAC (W303C, through the double doors) from 11 a.m.-1 p.m., students can go shop around for all kinds of donated clothes, shoes, trinkets and electronics.

The Free Store was started a few years ago by former Zero Waste interns to have a space on campus that helps limit the number of items that end up in landfills and to provide free goods for students and faculty. Interns Rachel Mudd and Jacob Foushee deem Justin Mog, the Assistant to the Provost for Sustainability Initiatives, a “sustainability guru” in terms of helping them organize the store. 

“‘Zero-waste’ is kind of a strong word,” Mog said when describing the initiative. “Basically our free store student staffers campaign for a reduction in waste and aim to try and stop clothes and other items from ending up in landfills.”

Similar to Goodwill, students can bring in items as donations for others to shop through, and there’s no money exchanged. “As far as screening, things are sorted and checked, but if they’re damaged or dirty we usually take them somewhere else. But we will take pretty much anything, excluding baby to youth clothing,” they said.

And it’s an admittedly small space. But that small space represents a much greater goal.

According to a recent NPR article, donation-based stores like Goodwill threw out around 13 million pounds of waste last year. U of L was recently called Kentucky’s top school for sustainability according to Sierra Magazine, most notably exceeding its 2020 carbon emissions goal by reducing them 35 percent. According to the Post-Landfill Action Network (PLAN), the university has a Zero Waste score of 58.2 percent (other campuses that work with PLAN average around 40-50 percent). The hope is that with better signage/promotion, the Free Store can grow to contribute more to the report and U of L’s overall sustainability efforts.

On the last Tuesday of each month, the Free Store moves to inside the Red Barn for a public “Free Sale.” If you would like to make donations, there is a bin at the bottom of Unitas Tower, tentatively getting relocated to the SAC. 

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal //

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BRIEF: Campus closed until Friday due to freezing weather Wednesday, Feb 10 2021 

By Joseph Garcia —

The University of Louisville is shutting its doors until Friday, Feb. 12 due to inclement weather.

A RAVE alert emailed to students, faculty and staff informed the community that U of L’s classes and offices would be online only beginning at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 10, through Thursday, Feb. 11.

Jefferson County is under a winter weather advisory as ice accumulates throughout the day, followed by snow and sleet tonight into Thursday. The National Weather Service said that “hazardous driving conditions could impact the morning and evening commutes the next couple of days.”

Some locations on campus will remain open for students who live on campus though.

The Ville Grill, POD Market at University Tower Apartments, Wendy’s and Papa John’s will remain open, but have reduced hours. Ekstrom Library will be closed during this time.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Ho Ho Ho: Campus Covered in Snow! Friday, Jan 29 2021 

The Belknap Campus sported a new coat of paint as a sudden bout of snow fell late Wednesday night, covering everything in a fresh layer of snow. School was still in session however–students could be seen in warm winter wear braving the elements.

Photos by Hevin Ramsey//The Louisville Cardinal

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Namesake of iconic Red Barn says farewell to U of L Monday, Aug 31 2020 

By Zoe Watkins- 

Recently, the Director of Red Barn Special Programs, George Howe, announced his retirement and will be leaving on Sept. 1. His time on campus has been long and adventurous, and his work has touched most everyone on campus.

Though Howe worked for the university for many years, he was not originally a full time student. He said that he only took one course through the school which was Philosophy of Education. Howe attended another college elsewhere, but not that too far away.

“I went to college in Ohio at a school called Muskingum College in New Concord, Ohio. I got my master’s degree at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia in 1969. I graduated from undergraduate at Muskingum in 1965,” Howe said.

Howe came to work at U of L through his contact here, Gary Steely. Steely was working as the Dean of Students at the time.

The two met at a conference back in 1969 at the University of North Carolina. It was through Steely that Howe learned about the creation of a new position, Director of Student Activities.

“I kept in touch with him, and they advertised it and I got the job. I started in July 1970 which is the day U of L went into the state’s system,” Howe said.

Howe explained that his time at the university was filled with many different positions. He started his career as the Director of Student Activities back in 1970, and was the first one to have that position. Afterwards, he explained he was as well that first director of the Student Activities Center before settling down into his position of being the Director Red Barn Special Programs in the late 90s.

His duties would change quite a bit across the years due to switching positions. Originally, Howe explained that he along with some others helped plan activities in the Red Barn such as movies, concerts, and barbeques.

“It became a popular building for the university, and we didn’t have the Student Activities Center until 1990, so that is all we had,” Howe said.

It was through these efforts that in 1991, Howe mentioned that the university was picked out of several schools across the country to be published in a book which featured the Red Barn. U of L was chosen as being one of the most excellent out of class experiences for students.

Howe said his time at the campus was like a dream come true and enjoyed every minute of it.  Some of his fondest moments that he mentioned was a live show in 1980 at the Red Barn for Dan Folgeberg who debuted his song “Run for the Roses” for the 160th running of the Kentucky Derby.

“It was a great experience and I got to work with so many student and faculty and staff,” he said.

Even though he is sad to be retiring, Howe still has some parting words left to those he will miss.

“Search your heart and search your soul, and be thankful of being apart of U of L. If you are in such and in so doing, please consider making a gift not used go to your own school. Please consider making a gift to U of L as part of your routine which you can do with the help of Allison Commings, the Director of Student Affairs.”

Photo Courtesy of U of L News

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Online advice: Don’t let COVID-19 get you behind Wednesday, Aug 26 2020 

By Maria Dinh —

As a response to COVID-19, the university has offered hybrid, distance and remote courses for the fall 2020 semester. Students are either attending in-person classes a couple times a week, meeting synchronously through Blackboard/Zoom or completing distance ed courses online. Professors have also given students the option to complete their hybrid course 100% online only for those who don’t want to attend class half in-person, half online.

Logging into a remote class in a full household can feel really chaotic. Working in the comfort of home can be unmotivating and distracting. Here is some advice for an online working environment:

Have a Designated Work Area.

Not everyone is blessed with a private home office to do all of their studying. Work on a desk or a kitchen table, hopefully near a good Wi-Fi connection.

It is recommended that students wear headphones with a microphone during a conference so they can focus on the lecture and participate. On Blackboard, there can be an echo during online lecture when the microphone is on. Make sure the microphone setting is muted so others can listen to the professor.

Junior CIS major Tatiana Aliaga-Mendoza had to transition from in-person to remote learning in the Spring of 2020. Aliaga-Mendoza said she keeps the essentials on her desk when she’s in class.

“I always have some water with me, my planner to write down assignments, a notebook since it’s harder to take notes on my laptop, and maybe a snack if I have back to back lectures,” she said.

Plan a Work Schedule.

Maintaining a work schedule is essential to staying on top of things.

Talk with roommates/family members on a work schedule to have quiet times for synchronous lectures on Blackboard or Zoom. Working from home can be distracting so it is important to stick to a focused routine.

Set reminders.

It’s important to maintain schoolwork and remember deadlines for assignments.

Distance ed courses don’t meet a couple times a week like in-person classes do. Distance ed courses are more lenient, but have important dates for assignments and exams. Writing down assignments in a planner or Google Calendar are a great way to stay organized. Download the Blackboard app and Microsoft Outlook app with notifications on for when professors make an announcement.

Review recorded lectures.

On Blackboard, there is a menu bar where recorded lectures are located for students to go back and watch what they might have missed. Some professors use Panopto for recorded lectures.

This program has shortcuts where students can click on the title of the slide and the video jumps on the time bar where the professor talks about the slide. Panopto even has a section for taking notes synchronized to the time of the recording.

 

So is it worth it to attend classes if the option is given?

“I think there is a lot of value to students learning in the classroom setting,” Brian Barnes, a philosophy professor at U of L said. “As a student, I found classroom interactions with faculty and other students to be invaluable for my learning. On the other hand, I don’t believe I should use my platform as a professor to coerce students into showing up when they feel unsafe during a public health emergency. The class interactions are recorded, and I believe that many students are capable of making good decisions about structuring their learning with online content. Again, much is lost in this format, but I do think it’s important that students have an option to learn in an environment where they feel safe.”

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

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Miracle Monocle perseveres and publishes its 14th issue amid pandemic Tuesday, Apr 28 2020 

By Zoe Watkins–

In the need of new reading material during quarantine? The English department’s award-winning online literary journal “Miracle Monocle,” has just released its 14th issue after overcoming many setbacks.

“Miracle Monocle” publishes twice a year and brings together a wide array of literary work and visual art pieces. These are then handpicked by a student editorial staff led by faculty editor, Dr. Sarah Strickley.

Since there are over 500 submissions every issue, Strickley said that there is a selection process to pick what goes in the journal. During this process, the staff reads and responds to each individual submission.

“The pieces that gain the most positive attention in our submission management system process go to a second round of consideration. We then narrow down the picks from there. We also solicit pieces from writers and artists whose work we admire but those pieces represent only a fraction of our contributors overall,” Strickley said.

The latest 14th issue was a challenging one to publish. Strickley said that the COVID-19 pandemic caused many logistical challenges. For example, their weekly in-person meetings now took place over Zoom and communication among staff took place online using Outlook’s Teams function.

The staff also had to change dates for some future publications such as “Monster, which is the next installment in the print anthology series. It has been postponed until the fall semester.

Despite all of this, the staff still managed to put together a full issue, which Strickley described as truly beautiful.

“I’m very proud of the fact that we came in on deadline and I’m awed by the fact that four students wrote reviews of new books for Issue 14. Truly exceptional work,” she said.

Amy Dotson, a graduating senior with an English major and Creative Writing minor, served as an associate editor. Dotson said publishing the issue during a pandemic was strange. She said that the process of editing and coding pieces were the same, but there could not be a launch event for the issue.

However, Dotson explained that everyone worked hard on their own time to meet the deadline and gave praise to the work Strickley and assistant editor Adam Yeich put into the journal.

“It’s because of their tireless efforts that the journal is what it is. It’s a labor of love. And we all love it. So, we made it happen. Hopefully, this issue is a little ray of light for many in an otherwise dark time,” Dotson said.

She said her favorite part of making the issue was reading through all the submissions.

“People can send in some strange things, so going through submissions can be like winding a jack-in-the-box,” Dotson explained. “But that’s kind of what I love–how every time you open a new submission, you’re hoping it’s going to be the next incredible piece of work. And sometimes it is!”

Ashley Bittner, one of the two graduate editors for the “Miracle Monocle,” said going through the submissions was his favorite part as well, as they provided insight into a world that he has not seen or experienced yet.

“Papers come in from around the world, all writers with something to stay, and reading over it is very cosmopolitan,” Bittner said.

He said that his favorite pieces currently are Kendyl Harmeling’s “An Unbecoming End” and Emily Beck Cogburn’s “Crossing the River.”

Now with issue 14 released, Strickley described the end of this editorial cycle as bittersweet.

“I’m always excited to send a new issue into the world, but that also means that I’m graduating a staff, which is a real loss on both a personal and professional level. This time around that contradiction was even more pronounced for me,” she said.

Strickley said that they could have eased production or stopped altogether, but they persevered through it all.  She said that this semester had a moving outcome, however unusual and fraught it was.

“I want to thank my staff for renewing my faith in the project of the journal. It’s about bringing people together to celebrate art, right? In a time when we can’t occupy the same literal space, it’s more important than ever to come together in the realm of ideas. And that’s exactly what we’ve done,” Strickley said.

If you would like to check out the latest issue, go to http://louisville.edu/miraclemonocle.

File graphic// The Louisville Cardinal

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Go off the beaten path and take a trip to these uncommon spots at UofL Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Maria Dinh —

There common places on campus that most students like to hang out such as Ekstrom Library, the Student Activities Center and the Belknap Academic Building. Here are some uncommon spots on campus to check out when out for a walk.

Texas Roadhouse Study Lounge – College of Business

Located in the basement of the College of Business, there is a study room that is furnished just like a Texas Roadhouse restaurant. No, this room does not serve bread rolls, but inside has a vending machine with a hot water dispenser so you can make some instant coffee and tea while studying. This lounge isn’t a place for socializing and the noise level is under a whisper.

Dwight Anderson Memorial Music Library – School of Music

To the right of the main doors in the School of Music is a small library full of beautiful indoor plants and an antique piano. Freshman Katherine Boyce has her own favorite quirk about the music library.

She said, “Probably the people, if that counts. People there tend to have more fun and be a bit noisier than in the other libraries. It’s hard to go a single hour without hearing someone there burst into song or start making some sort of music. It makes the atmosphere livelier and more fun than a lot of other places.”

School of Music Stairs – School of Music

In the daytime, these steps look like ordinary steps. On campus at night, color changing lights shine on the steps. The colorful lights are a good opportunity for taking photos to post on Instagram.

Schneider Hall Art Gallery – Schneider Hall

The Speed Art Museum isn’t the only gallery on campus. The Schneider Hall Art Gallery features student artwork from the Hite Art Institute. This is a small exhibit to go and escape. Everyone is welcome to view the art and doors open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Hite Art Institute Fountains – Schneider Hall

The perfect spot to be at on campus when the weather is nice is the fountain at Schneider Hall. This place is perfect to sit back and relax between classes or chat with a friend. 

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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Make this year’s dorm a home away from home Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Delaney Hildreth–

As the new semester comes closer, students who will be living on-campus for the year will start planning what they’ll take with them to their dorms in August. Campus Housing has a list of recommended items on their website, but to help newcomers to dorm living, here are some additional things that will make any dorm more inviting and functional.

  One of the most important aspects to prepare for is how much space in the dorm there is to work with, which only gets more complicated when adding a roommate to the mix.

“Dorm rooms don’t typically offer a lot of space, so you have to get creative to make room for all of your belongings,” BusinessInsider.com aptly said. The site offers solutions like plastic drawers to go under beds and over-the-door pocket organizers to maximize storage potential.

They also point out, “You don’t get much space in dorm rooms, so any multi-purpose items are great for capitalizing on what you actually do have.” They recommend items like desk lamps that include USB outlets or laundry hampers that have pockets for laundry supplies.

There are a lot of items that get left behind or overlooked in the hustle of moving in, but these are often the most crucial in dorm living.

Incoming sophomore Dayna Thomas experienced this when moving in last year. “I didn’t have a mattress topper for my bed at first. After a few weeks of sleeping on the dorm provided mattress, I quickly realized why everyone else had mattress toppers and then went and got one for myself,” Thomas said.

Things like trash cans, paper towels, power strips, and dishes are items typically taken for granted, but nonetheless important, especially in a dorm setting where students will spend a lot of their time.

Thomas also said, “One of the most critical things to keep in your dorm is snacks. When everything else on campus is closer and you just need something to get you by, having some snacks on hand in your dorm is a life saver!”

Finally, bring cozy, homey items like rugs, extra pillows, and wall decorations. Dorms are only equipped with the bare necessities, but transforming the room with a few decorative items are sure to turn any dorm into a cozy living space for the year.

These items, while not as functional as the other things mentioned here, are what will make dorm life much more comfortable and satisfactory to take the edge off living in a new location by making it feel more like home.

File photo//The Louisville Cardinal

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Heads up incoming freshman, here’s some advice to survive college Sunday, Apr 26 2020 

By Blake Wedding —

As orientation draws near, The Cardinal has decided to put together a list for incoming students comprised of helpful hints and suggestions on how to survive and prosper in college.

Attend any and all events 

The first tip that some incoming students may forget the importance of is to take advantage of any and all university events specifically catered to incoming students. These events will not only help students de-stress and get their minds off of studying for a while, but they are also excellent opportunities to meet people, make friends and find groups of like-minded people on campus.

Go to class

This is more of an obvious tip, but it cannot be understated: go to class. There are plenty of upperclassmen and older students at the University of Louisville who have been incredibly successful in their classes over the years because they understand this idea. While it is perfectly okay to miss classes for understandable reasons, one thing to avoid is the pitfall of making a habit out of missing classes.

Make an effort to participate in class as much as possible

One of the biggest issues many students face is that they fail to understand the importance in actively participating in class. Students should try to ask as many questions as possible and to interact with their professors both inside and out of class. This means that by being a more active and engaged student, professors and instructors will notice your initiative and discipline. This is one of the best steps you can take in making your learning in college more positive and fulfilling.

Study 

While it goes without saying that studying is imperative to prospering in college, another equally important thing to keep in mind is to find a proper place to study. A proper study space is all about finding a place where students can decompress, relax and focus foremost on what requires their attention. The library is a great place for many people at U of L to study, but some people tend to prefer local coffee shops around Louisville. It is all about personal preference at the end of the day. 

Make sure to prioritize sleep

Many people have made the mistake of losing sleep in favor of socializing or studying more than their mind and body can take. It might be easy to find yourself losing sleep, but it is something that their body and mind require in order to truly prosper in your classes. 

Graphic by// The Louisville Cardinal

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