Bringing awareness to ULPD safety tips for students Thursday, Oct 21 2021 

By Catherine Brown–

After a break-in and sexual assault of a female student at The Retreat was reported on October 11, students have been worried of the consequences to their personal safety around campus.

To ease these concerns, please keep in mind the following tips for staying safe on and around U of L campuses.

Never travel alone when in an unfamiliar area or late at night.

When traveling late at night, you should be aware of your surroundings at all times. This is hard to do when walking alone. As such, consider bringing a travel companion with you — a friend, a classmate, a roommate, sibling, etc.

When you travel with others, you double the opportunity to spot any oddities in your area. Both you and your companion can be on the lookout for any weird noises, sights, or suspicious happenings. Please stay off of your phone.

If both of you are traveling to different places, you might want to walk together until one person gets to their destination. Once you know that they’re inside a building or around people that either of you trust, then you can leave. 

And be sure that you communicate with the other person at all times. Text or call the other person to let them know when you arrive. 

If you travel late at night, be sure to stay in well-lit areas. Belknap Campus has a walking trail called the “L Trail.” The L Trail is a long sidewalk path accompanied by streetlights to provide safer, well-lit travel between the SAC, the Quad, Ville Grill, and a few residence halls.

Keep doors and windows closed and locked at all times.

After the incident at The Retreat, U of L administration along with ULPD sent out reminders for students to keep all doors and windows locked when not in use. Before leaving for class, ensure that your doors and windows are closed and locked properly. When you go to bed, do the same thing. 

By keeping your doors and windows locked, you can protect yourself against potential break-ins.

Always have a police number on hand. 

Ensure that you know the numbers of any safety department on and around campus. U of L Chief of Police Gary Lewis that if you “see something, say something.” He urges anyone to use the campus police dispatch number (502) 852-6111 or 911.

If you have to call the dispatch for any reason, provide the dispatcher with your location and state of emergency. Give any details that you can about the emergency or about any possible perpetrators of a crime (if applicable). 

If traveling at night without a companion, call the university escort service to be taken to your destination. The service is free and easy to use. Call the Cardinal Cruiser escort service at 852-6111 to request an escort to anywhere within 4 blocks from Belknap Campus or to parking lots around the Health Sciences Center Campus.

You can also download the RAVE Guardian app to easily reach emergency services, report a tip on a crime, or make friends/emergency services aware of your ETA.

The university provides a variety of resources for students and faculty to be safe while on campus. You have a right to feel safe in public and especially at U of L. Don’t hesitate to utilize any resources necessary.

Graphic by Eli Hughes//The Louisville Cardinal

The post Bringing awareness to ULPD safety tips for students appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Police foil attempted robbery near University Towers Thursday, Aug 26 2021 


By Eli Hughes–

The University of Louisville Police Department says it stopped an attempted robbery and assault of a student near University Tower Apartments early Wednesday morning. The info came in an Aug. 25  RAVE alert.

“A UofL police officer on patrol identified an attempted robbery and assault Wednesday at about 2:30 a.m. near University Tower Apartments,” the alert read. “The officer interrupted the assault and pursued the suspect, who fled the scene. UofL Police secured the immediate area. Staff are providing support and resources to the student. ULPD is expanding patrols in the area.”

ULPD Chief of Police Gary Lewis said that the investigation is ongoing and a physical description of the suspect cannot be released at this time. Lewis did not release any further information regarding property lost or injury suffered by the victim but said the victim received immediate care.

The RAVE alert was sent out at 9:59 a.m. Wednesday morning and Lewis said the alert was delayed because police did not perceive any urgent threat.

“The suspect fled the scene eliminating any immediate threat to the campus community. The investigation later revealed that an assault and attempted robbery had occurred and the notification was distributed to the campus community,” Lewis said.

ULPD reminds students to keep the following safety guidelines in mind:

  • Stay alert and be aware of your surroundings.
  • Walk with confidence and purpose.
  • Use well-lit public walkways.
  • Walk with a friend.
  • Avoid texting or displaying a smartphone while traveling.
  • Use the Cardinal Cruiser escort service by calling (502) 852-6111.
  • Download the free RAVE safety app for your iPhone or Android phone.

Anybody who has any information on this incident is encouraged to call (502) 852-6111.

The post Police foil attempted robbery near University Towers appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Brief: LMPD makes arrest on campus Friday, Feb 19 2021 

By Eli Hughes–

The Louisville Metro Police Department made an arrest after an incident on Fourth Street between Brandeis Avenue and Cardinal Boulevard on February 19.

University of Louisville Police Department Chief Gary Lewis said ULPD was on the scene assisting LMPD with the situation.  “Today, the Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) contacted our agency and advised that they were in pursuit of a vehicle on Fourth Street and the suspect later stopped, then was barricaded inside the car just south of Cardinal Boulevard,” Lewis said. “ULPD responded to assist in setting up traffic control and a perimeter.”

Students received a RAVE alert at 11:54 A.M. informing students to avoid the area. A second RAVE alert was issued and 12:40  P.M. with an update that the issue had been resolved.

“After approx. 45 minutes, the suspect exited the vehicle without incident and LMPD took custody. The scene was cleared and a subsequent UofL Safety Update was sent to the campus community notifying students that they could return to this area on campus,” Lewis said.

The Louisville Cardinal reached out to the LMPD for information regarding this incident but has not received a reply at the time of publishing this article.

We will update this story with more information as we learn more.

Photo by Sean Willis

The post Brief: LMPD makes arrest on campus appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

U of L’s affiliated campus housing has seen higher crime rate in recent months Friday, Jan 29 2021 

By Eli Hughes–

The University of Louisville Police Department has reported higher rates of crime over the past year than usual. These increases in crime seem to be especially affecting the campus-affiliated apartment buildings: The Province, The Retreat, The Nine and The Clubhouse.

“Efforts are underway to increase police officer presence with the primary goal of reducing potential crime,” ULPD Chief Gary Lewis said. “There have been a number of successful apprehensions of suspects following these incidents based upon the due diligence of marked patrol cruisers and plain clothes detectives.”

From Oct. 2020 to Dec. 2020 there were a total of 60 crimes reported at these four properties combined. The building with the most reported crimes was The Clubhouse with 20 reported incidents over the course of the four months. The Retreat had the least reported incidents, with seven crimes reported over the three months.

The three most common incidents reported were theft, criminal mischief and domestic violence. Theft accounts for 16 of these reports, not including two incidents of burglary, four of robbery and one motor vehicle theft. Criminal mischief accounts for ten incidents and domestic violence accounts for nine.

All four of the affiliated properties were contacted for comment, but The Retreat, The Clubhouse and The Nine have not reached out as of the publishing of this article.

“We do not have any information other than what has been provided by the police,” Heather Hadden, general manager of The Province said.

The most recent incident at these properties was a robbery that occurred in the parking lot of The Province on Jan. 19. No Rave alert was sent out at the time but students received an email later that day informing them that a non-affiliates phone was stolen and she was assaulted with pepper spray before she was able to drive away and flag down a ULPD officer.

Lewis says he is not sure what the increase in crime can be attributed to, but he also says he is interested in evaluating the crime data from 2020 in order to find out and decide how to best address the problem.

In the meantime, Lewis had advice for students trying to stay safe on campus.

“We continue to remind students, faculty and staff not to engage in dialogue or conversation with unknown parties, especially during late-night hours, while also keeping all windows and doors locked,” Lewis said.

File Graphic//The Louisville Cardinal

The post U of L’s affiliated campus housing has seen higher crime rate in recent months appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Student robbed at gunpoint outside of Community Park Tuesday, Oct 6 2020 

By Madelin Shelton — 

A student was robbed at gunpoint late last night outside of Community Park after an officer spotted the incident during a routine patrol.

University of Louisville students received a RAVE alert a little after 11 p.m. on Oct. 5 in response to the robbery.

The officer noticed a subject walking on the street who then ducked behind a parked vehicle on 4th street in front of the residence hall. The officer proceeded to investigate, where they saw the subject leaning over what appeared to be a person on the ground.

“Officers immediately responded, making contact with the victim on the ground and learned that they had just been held at gunpoint and [had] their cellphone stolen,” Lewis said.

Officers attempted to apprehend the subject, but failed. However, they were able to recover the stolen cellphone in their search. There were no reported injuries to the victim.

The identity of the suspect remains unknown and an arrest has yet to be made, but the RAVE alert described the individual as “a black male of unknown age, braids, 5’10” 180 lbs, wearing a white jogging suit.” ULPD’s Detective Unit is conducting a follow-up investigation.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

The post Student robbed at gunpoint outside of Community Park appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

U of L apologizes for vague RAVE alert Friday, Sep 11 2020 

By Eli Hughes–

A vague RAVE alert sent campus-wide at 2:19 a.m. Sept. 10 potentially endangered students and resulted in an almost immediate apology.

The alert said: “A black male wearing a red hoodie ran from Clark County Indiana Police and is possibly on campus. If you see someone matching this description- call ULPD or LMPD.”

Faculty and students said the vague description was potentially dangerous to black students on campus.

Three U of L officials released statements the morning after the alert went out to apologize for the incident.

“This morning a RAVE Alert went out asking our campus to be on the lookout for a Black male in a red hoodie, ” President Neeli Bendapudi said in her statement. “That is not an anti-racist statement. While the description may have been true, it is too vague to be of any help and it perpetuates negative stereotypes (especially on a campus whose colors are red and black and whose student population is proudly more than 12% Black) that make some members of our campus community targets. There is no excuse for that.”

Bendapudi apologized to those who were negatively affected by the alert and promise that the university would do better in the future.

ULPD Chief Gary Lewis took responsibility for the mistake and said the alert was unapproved and did not fit the criteria for a RAVE alert.

“The lack of oversight in approval of the message, the tone and the ambiguous wording all potentially contributed to making some individuals on our campus that already suffer from the trauma of racial stereotyping less safe and not more,” Lewis said. “Further, our policy is to use RAVE Alerts for law enforcement updates only when there is either 1) a serious crime, or 2) an immediate threat to our campus. This situation did not meet either criteria.”

Dr. Kaila Story, a professor of Women and Gender Studies and Pan African Studies at U of L, posted her frustration to Facebook.

“These vague RAVE alerts have always put marginalized groups on our campus at risk. BIPOC faculty, students and staff on our campus already have to navigate racialized and gendered microaggressions in almost every space on our yard, and when alerts like these come through our phones and emails they inevitably invite more scrutiny and harm to these already vulnerable groups,” Story said.

“It wasn’t just Black male bodies that were put at risk, it was also Black bodies that registered to onlookers as masculine, non-binary and/or masculine as well,” Story said. “So many folks were put at risk.”

One student who was hurt and disappointed when he saw the RAVE alert was Torien Miles, a senior at U of L. “I’m in the marching band and we had just had a performance the day before and I was on campus, as a black male wearing red. I wear red all the time,” Miles said.

“So I fit the description just a couple hours before that RAVE alert went out. And if had gone out, instead of 2 a.m. at 8 p.m. or something I would have been on campus fitting that description.”

Miles believes that if the university is going to stay true to their anti-racist ideas, there needs to be actions taken, and not just apologies after the fact. “That email is a good step in the right direction but it takes a lot more visible action and a lot more workable action to make these things right,” he said.

Faye Jones, senior associate vice president for diversity and equity said, “As the mother of children that fit the description of the RAVE Alert that went out this morning, I am sitting with the enormous weight and frustration of yet another example of how our systems can fail our young Black and Brown students, faculty and staff. The system unquestionably failed this morning.”

Jones said she would be working with her colleagues and university stakeholders to prevent this issue from happening again. She also apologized and offered support to anyone who was hurt by the mistake.

Story agrees that this mistake goes against the anti-racist goals the university has.

“If U of L truly aims to be seen and regarded as a premier anti-racist institution these types of incidents cannot continue to happen. Their needs to be structural changes behind those aims. I also think that financial allocations need to be adjusted within the University to prioritize departments, programs, and initiatives that have always been invested in teaching anti-racist praxis,” she said.

The Student Government Association ‘Top Four’ also believes the university needs to be held accountable for this incident. In a statement posted on social media they said,  “The Student Government Association shares your frustrations regarding this RAVE alert incident as well as the repeated alerts that went out a couple weeks ago regarding protests in the area. Campus safety includes all of us, and we cannot achieve that when we put our Black students at risk.”

“Please know that SGA has been working with ULPD and university administration on this issue. We are committed to holding university leadership accountable to this repeated issue.”

Graphic by Joseph Garcia // The Louisville Cardinal

The post U of L apologizes for vague RAVE alert appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

University leaders hold virtual forum with community Thursday, Jun 11 2020 

By Joseph Garcia —

University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi held a virtual forum with U of L Police Department Chief Gary Lewis and Criminal Justice Department Chair Cherie Dawson-Edwards on June 9 to answer community questions on the relationship between ULPD and the Louisville Metro Police Department.

Lewis began by explaining the current relationship ULPD has with LMPD and how it goes back to the 1970s.

“Following the Kent State incident, many universities felt it important to create and develop their own police force,” Lewis said. “Many may not know, but this organization started with a Louisville Metro retiree.”

Lewis said that when he arrived to U of L two years ago, ULPD had about 98% retired Louisville Metro police officers working for ULPD. “To date, we are at about 40%,” Lewis said.

Lewis said that ULPD is a state accredited police department with less than 50 sworn officers, about 30 security officers and travel escorts.

Bendapudi also explained there is no formal partnership agreement between the two police departments that U of L can divest from.

Dawson-Edwards told students: “We hear you.”

“I realize that people think that training and education as just a reform thing, not a divest, but I want to argue it’s both,” Dawson-Edwards said. “We have to do training and education, and we need to do it better. We need to hold the police accountable, we need to hold ourselves accountable for that education and training.”

Like Bendapudi said in her response to BSU, Dawson-Edwards has committed to doing equity audits for all criminal justice academic programs, including the police executive leadership development certificate.

“I want to make sure that we are infusing equity, inclusion, diversity, social justice, all types of things in our curriculum,” she said. “It is not enough for us to just teach people how to be police and not teach people what they should expect from the community in this society that we’re living in.”

She anticipates the Southern Police Institute, a 60-year old officer training program located and taught at U of L, will do the same. This could include more activities, training and education about these particular issues with current police officers.

During the Q&A portion of the forum, Bendapudi was asked why U of L could not do what the University of Minnesota did in choosing to dissociate from their local police department.

“The reality is that we are an urban campus as you’ve heard,” Bendapudi said. “Our streets and roads, and Louisville’s, are intertwined. So we definitely need to work together–that’s the concurrent and overlapping jurisdictions you’ve heard about.”

Dawson-Edwards further explained that what is coming out of Minnesota is because people have been researching and doing the work to understand the problems for a long time.

“They are primed for it,” Dawson-Edwards said. “They have a 150 year history document on performance review for their police called ‘Enough is Enough.'”

“You can’t just take one city’s or one university’s blueprint and lay it on top of ours without making sure that our stuff matches theirs,” Dawson-Edwards said.

Bendapudi ended the forum by reiterating the actions U of L is taking, including now doing background checks for any officer who works at university events.

“As mother and leader of higher education, who has always cared for her students, I am telling you that we are going to work together on this,” Bendapudi said. “There is so much to learn.  I catch myself all the time when I forget all the privileges I have and you as young people, you’re educating us.”

She then committed to an anti-racist agenda moving forward. Bendapudi said there will be more forums in the future to continue discussion on broad, difficult topics.

“Let’s not forget this moment, this is not performative. This is not just until the news cycle changes. It’s important,” Bendapudi said. “I will do my best and I give you my word. My job is to do the very best I can for you, and that’s what I intend to do.”

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal 

The post University leaders hold virtual forum with community appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.