Viral sensation Rico Nasty to perform at SAB’s Spring Concert Thursday, Apr 1 2021 

By Grace Welsh

Tonight at 7:00 p.m., the University of Louisville’s Student Activities Board will host their annual spring concert, featuring rapper Rico Nasty. The forty-minute performance, done virtually through Microsoft Teams, will be free for U of L students who sign up through SAB’s Engage portal. After the show, Rico will be doing a 20 minute Q&A session, with questions provided by SAB.

Yasmean Fogle, SAB’s concert chair, is excited to bring a strong female artist to campus.

“We haven’t had one in a long time, and I felt like this was somebody that everyone could enjoy. Sometimes it can be hard to target a specific audience,” Fogle said. “But we think everyone can love her performance.”

After not being able to host 6LACK as planned last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Fogle is excited that students will be able to experience the show in their own way and engage in the performance as if it were real.

With tracks like “Smack a B****,” “OHFR” and “Jealous,” Rico has shown that she is an artist who is both exciting and relatable. Social media platforms like Tiktok, have aided Rico in becoming a viral sensation.

In choosing the artist for their spring concert, SAB’s executive board combed through a list of 25 potential artists provided by a well-known production company. Fogle and her team decided on Rico Nasty for based on her talent, well-rounded nature and ability to entertain.

“I think she’ll have a great show because she is super energetic and does whatever she wants, which is a great look,” Fogle said.

Graphic Courtesy of the Student Activities Board 

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raiseRED to host virtual dance marathon in February Thursday, Jan 21 2021 

By Grace Welsh —

The University of Louisville’s largest student-led philanthropic event is looking a little different this year. For the first time ever, raiseRED will be held completely virtually in order to remain within COVID-19 guidelines.

Traditionally an 18-hour dance marathon, the event will be broken up over six days throughout the week of Feb. 15. Each day’s event will consist of guest speakers and interactive events like trivia and games. The week concludes on Saturday, Feb. 20, when a closing ceremony will be held, during which, the organization will reveal of the amount of money raised.

Last year, raiseRED was able to raise over $690,000 to benefit pediatric cancer research.

raiseRED has touched the hearts of many in the last five years, raising over 3 million dollars for Norton’s Cancer Institute and U of L’s School of Medicine’s Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology. raiseRED also initiates mentorship programs between students and children, which allows students to make more of a direct and long-lasting impact on the families. According to the raiseRED website, the money goes directly towards funding those departments and the families in need.

“raiseRED, in my opinion, is the single most important organization tied to U of L,” said Team Leader Manu Nair. Nair is one of the hundreds of U of L students who have been working for the past year to ensure successful fundraising this year.

“Unless you have personally gone through this struggle, people don’t know how hard it can be to watch your child battle cancer,” Nair said. “We are fighting for them as they already have an immense battle to fight themselves.”

Ashley Correl, is a freshman who is participating in the event for the first time. “I can already feel that everyone is so excited to get involved. It inspires so many others to join in on raising money,” she said.

raiseRED participants can still join on behalf of an organization (such as athletics, the Indian Student Association, Porter Scholars, ELSB, Greek life) or they can join on an individual basis.

Students who raise $200 by Feb. 15 will be paired with a team of other dancers and given the opportunity to participate in interactive events. Fundraising requires a bit of creativity, with many members doing things like social media games and clothing/bake sales.

While being virtual may hinder some interpersonal connections, raiseRED is about helping those in need, Ruby Young, raiseRed’s student outreach coordinator, said.

“I think this year more than ever, people will realize how much help these kids and their families need. COVID-19 impacted them in ways we could never imagine.”

For more information on how you can make a difference, visit the raiseRED Facebook page or their Instagram.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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U of L students share what it’s like to learn during a pandemic Thursday, Oct 29 2020 

By Gabriel Howard — 

Colleges across the nation are now months into their fall semester. While some have failed to welcomes students back, the University of Louisville is one of many schools that has had a successful reopening.

With a low positivity rate of 1.94%, campus has been a relatively safe place for students to come and learn. And for those who don’t want to come to campus, distance education is a viable option for some.

With this in mind, how have the students felt getting their education in this new look form of university?

Taking a look at students from various majors and schedules, their experiences during this semester seem to all have different trajectories.

Junior business major Tristen Bromagen said he has had an up and down experience up to this point.

“Coming to campus was something I never expected given how last semester ended,” Bromagen said. “I really liked that they opened campus back up. I felt like I might never be back in the classroom.”

But Bromagen said that online learning has been a struggle for him.

“Online classes simply aren’t for me. They don’t feel fully engaging and leave me wishing that I could be in a classroom,” he said.

Such a feeling is something that a lot of students might be able to relate to. While others couldn’t agree less.

With online classes being charged the same as in-person or hybrid courses, a lot of students have decided to steer clear of going to campus. Instead they have opted for online instruction, getting an education from the comfort of their own residence.

Sydney Broadway, a senior of the college of education has had a different experience in the virtual environment.

“Learning my classes online is actually helping me prepare for when I have to teach my own classes online in the future,” Broadway said.

She continued to point out how online learning has been more beneficial than the classroom because she has more resources to learn and gain a better understanding of what she is learning.

“The extra time we have to work and learn in the online courses helps me way more than I expected,” Broadway said. “I’m starting to wish I had always taken classes online.”

No matter the choice, it seems while some students  love having an almost entirely virtual experience, others dread having it stare at the computer screen for hours upon end. It would be safe to say that the experience of virtual learning is a bit of a mixed bag.

File Graphic // The Louisville Cardinal

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Cardinals’ basketball wins national championship in virtual simulation Thursday, Apr 23 2020 

By John McCarthy —

With live sports have been suspended during the coronavirus pandemic, there has been an emergence of esports. These simulated games help fill the void of traditional sports leagues now on hiatus.

ESPN took advantage of the opportunity and aired 12 hours of esports which included a Madden NFL20 tournament, a F1 Virtual Grand Prix, the Rocket League World Championship and an NBA 2K players tournament. Along with these events, Madden has also run a Greatest of All-Time tournament featuring the best players from every team. The tournaments utilize advanced algorithms to run the simulations.

One Twitter user, @2020NCAASim2020,  used a similar method to run a simulation on the 2020 March Madness Tournament, and the University of Louisville came out on top to win the virtual National Championship on April 6.

The bracket was based on the final projections from ESPN’s Joe Lunardi. The twitter handle, who is not associated with the NCAA, said “the use of advanced statistical algorithms” helped create the simulation.

In any case, it’s not a real tournament, but with March Madness canceled, this was the closest we could get to the real thing. Louisville won as a virtual No. 4 seed against the virtual No. 1 seed Kansas Jayhawks 74-69 for the virtual national title.

Virtual junior Jordan Nwora led the way with 17 points, virtual freshman David Johnson scored 11 points and virtual senior Dwayne Sutton added 10 points and six rebounds in the fictitious victory.

Shively Sporting Goods is selling a t-shirts in celebration of the victory.

Graphic by ??? // The Louisville Cardinal

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