Forecastle Festival announces pause in 2023 to “determine best path forward” Monday, Nov 14 2022 

By Tate Luckey

For the first time in 20 years except a two-year COVID-19 hiatus, Forecastle Festival will not be held in 2023, the organization announced Friday.

“Forecastle Festival will be taking a pause in 2023. It’s incredible to see what this festival has become and how the Louisville community has grown around it over the past 20 years,” their press release states.

“There are some things that we want to work on and improve for the future, so we’re going to take some time to strategize and determine the best path forward for the festival.⁣”

After launching in 2002, the Foundation has donated over $700,000 dollars to local and global conservation projects. The 2022 festival had an estimated economic impact of 9.1 million dollars in the Lousiville area, according to Louisville Tourism.

“Louisville Tourism supports and respects the difficult decision announced by festival organizers and knows it was not one made lightly. Louisville is very supportive of our homegrown festivals and the Forecastle Festival can certainly be credited with putting our city on the musical map, positioning us to reach a national audience. Not only does this impact our music scene, but it is a significant economic loss as well. We look forward to welcoming them back in the future and appreciate their contributions in elevating Louisville’s musical brand,” Cleo Battle, president and CEO said in a statement.

So why put the show on pause?

While Forecastle Festival hasn’t announced a formal reason for the pause, several students and fans alike have contributed their theories regarding the apparent cancelation.

“I don’t know if they have the current infrastructure to support the artists, you know? The whole point is that it’s at the Waterfront,” a U of L junior Allison Niemeier said.

Senior Nick House agreed, arguing that there’s a level of consistency you can expect at other fests. “It’s not necessarily the same [for Forecastle], in terms of artists, planning, theme.”

“I think they completely forgot about the whole point of Forecastle. When you appeal to a primarily younger audience, the revenue they expect to bring in is going to be very small. I was a bit confused about why they took away Party Cove, too. I didn’t attend any other fests this past year, but I probably will with Forecastle being canceled,” senior Miranda Frazier said.

Junior Taylor Price had a similar thought- “If you look at other festivals like Bourbon and Beyond or Louder than Life, they’re having artists like Slipknot, Chris Stapleton, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, – my best guess is that they want more legacy acts that transcend generations to bring in a bigger audience, and likely need more funding.”

Last year’s lineup included headliners like Tyler the Creator, Phoebe Bridgers, and Louisville native Jack Harlow; turnout was just shy of 75,000 throughout the weekend.

If you’d like to read some interviews with some of last year’s artists, you can check out The Louisville Cardinal’s interviews with KIRBY, Dayglow, and Louisville’s own The Homies.

File Photo // Matt Stone (Courier Journal) //

The post Forecastle Festival announces pause in 2023 to “determine best path forward” appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Dayglow Talks Forecastle 2022, Bucc-ee’s, and Harmony House Tour Tuesday, May 31 2022 

By Tate Luckey

Sloan Struble’s first foray into music came in 2018 when he recorded Fuzzybrain entirely in his bedroom during his senior year. Now, touring as Dayglow, he has amassed a surprisingly dedicated following through social media sites like Tiktok, breaking through with his single “Can I Call You Tonight?”.

His set at Forecastle included songs from his 2018 album, Fuzzybrain, and his 2021 album, Harmony House. They also covered Tears for Fears’ “Everybody Wants to Rule the World”. “Louisville! At least, that’s how the lady at the airport told me to say it. You guys are great! Maybe bring us back again sometime?”

Before his performance, Dayglow talked with The Louisville Cardinal.

 

Dayglow by Pooneh Ghana for Forecastle

 

I’m going to start by asking you the most important question that I can ask you, as a Texas native: is Bucc-ee’s really that good?

‘Oh yeah, man. It’s great. I currently reside in Austin, but there’s one when I drive to Dallas to visit my parents. It’s a big store, with very good food.”

I see I see, I was curious. Moving on to your music, I would describe your sound as sort of softer in instrumentation, but still energetic in rhythm. How do you translate that feeling into a live performance like at Forecastle?

“I think it’s all just about bringing that energy but having lots of fun. I love interacting with the crowd. I think that’s kind of the idea.”

Speaking of that level of interaction, it’s very interesting that you post videos on your YouTube channel of you breaking down the production of many of your songs. What made you decide to do that?

“Yeah! I find it’s fun to both analyze it and perform it. I know that there are plenty of songs that I hear that I wish were broken down, and I would find it a little bit upsetting if a person I listened to didn’t do that for me.”

 

Dayglow by Pooneh Ghana for Forecastle 2022

 

Your newest album, Harmony House, came out last year, and you’re here at Forecastle today. Can you talk a bit about what you have planned next?

“Well, for starters, there is more music I’m going to announce soon this year. But for right now, it’s mainly just a lot of touring, having fun.”

If you’d like to see more of Dayglow, you can check out their channel here, and site here. Their newest album, Harmony House, is out now.

Photo Courtesy // Forecastle Festival //

The post Dayglow Talks Forecastle 2022, Bucc-ee’s, and Harmony House Tour appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

KIRBY talks Forecastle 2022, Sis, He Wasn’t The One, and Stax Records Monday, May 30 2022 

By Tate Luckey

R&B and Soul artist, KIRBY

“We don’t funk with racism, we don’t funk with gun violence, and we damn sure don’t funk with the law telling women what to do with our bodies,” KIRBY said to the Forecastle crowd before moving to her next energetic song.

Mississippi native KIRBY opened with an empowering performance during Day 3 of Forecastle Festival, showcasing her groovy R&B sound from 2018’s Sis and 2021’s Sis, He Wasnt The One. After her show, The Louisville Cardinal sat down with KIRBY.

How is it being here for Forecastle? 

“I had some good vegan food. Any city that has a southern vegan place, I’m already thinking ‘Alright well I feel welcome,’ but the crowd was so nice! Even being earlier in the day, they were just in it ready to eat it up. I know [Louisville] is technically not the south, but to me, it felt like the south.” 

Yeah, it’s a pretty big topic of debate, especially with Louisville being so close to Indiana. The rest of the state has more of a southern identity.

“Yeah, and Indiana is literally across the river, that’s the wild!”

What did think of your show specifically? Were you kind of nervous to go out?

“This is my first time with musicians, but they killed it. We did a tour with John Legend last year, and Pink Sweats, and so I normally use both of their dancers. ”

I would agree you did great! In doing a bit of research about you, I was surprised to learn you helped co-write 2015’s FourFiveSeconds with Ye, Rihanna and Paul McCartney. Can you talk about what it was like to share the songwriting process with them?

“Sure, it was really a lot of 1 on 1 experience. The song wasn’t too good for Ye, but it was good for Ri Ri. I didn’t even know that was going to be the end result, but she killed it. As a songwriter, you kinda dream of moments like that. Kanye was part of the reason why I’m doing what I do now, and so to give back to someone who gave so much to you, and for Rhianna to put out a guitar-driven song, it was dope to be a part of. I’ve never done a live cover of it, and everyone was singing their asses off! The whole crowd! I remember thinking ‘This is what it must feel like’. I was ready for them to sing just the hook, but they started off at the first verse.”

The aesthetic of your show; it gave off very heavy Soul Train vibes. Can you talk a bit about translating the sound of your records to the stage?

“Choosing the little things, that’s the most fun part, especially like the choices of what to play in the back. You don’t want to exactly make it a copy [of soul], but I find you need artists to, in a way, pay tribute to a dying art. You need to in some ways make it seem fresh.”

Definitely. I found it very empowering for anyone listening.  

“I always want [my live shows] to come off as people empowerment. I want people to leave feeling like ‘I’m bad as shit.’ Sis, He Wasn’t The One was me detailing the whole truth. I felt like for me not to tell that part was me not telling the whole story. It’s a bit of a transitional record. I really really feel my best on stage. If you don’t leave and feel like you’re the baddest or feeling the best version of yourself, or seen; I want to give people that.”

Well, what’s next?

“We’re still working on a project, and I’m excited to make a bigger sound. I feel like I still don’t have a record where people are like “Ugh, it made me cry;’ I’m ready to lean more into emotionality.”“We also have a tour with Leon Bridges coming up, in Europe. I know that’ll change me as an artist, performing those songs in front of those kinds of crowds.”

 

Kirby by Roger Ho for Forecastle

 

The theme of Forecastle Festival 2022 this year was to “be naturally awesome“. In what ways do you embody that, or how can others try to be their most naturally awesome?

“I put myself out there when it seems like no one’s clapping. I feel like in some ways younger people these days feel kind of suffocated by social media. ‘If my video doesn’t get a million views, why even post it,’ right? Being naturally awesome is just being persistent in whatever your truth is and not wavering because people aren’t responding. It sounds cliche, but there is not another you! I can interview with 10 other people, and the interview won’t be the same. You’ve gotta know that that has value.”

‘I met a dude from Tame Impala, I couldn’t quite identify if it was Kevin [Parker], but he asked me what time I performed. I said I opened today at 2:30, and he told me he headlined last night! Regardless, we both shared the same elevator.”

That’s a really good perspective to have, especially right now.

“Right!”

I do want to ask- you also aren’t currently signed to a label, right? Are there any struggles with being a more independent artist? 

“The biggest thing about having a label is having the money, period. The money and the marketing. Nowadays marketing is all TikTok, but it’s mainly just about the bank. Like saying “I want a sound guy or pay my dancers the top rate.” it’s less about me. My whole team is black and I want to pay them the top tier. When you’re independent it’s hard. Sometimes you can’t give them what a label artist can give, and that’s why it’s important to support your independent artists. They want to get the best and also pay them the best.”

Can you elaborate a bit more, as to how your team was assembled? Was it kind of through people you knew, or?

“No no no. I found my manager before Pink Sweats really blew up- I was trying to get on the Spotify playlists, and I saw Pink was on the cover of the R&B playlist, and at the time he had maybe 9000 listeners. This is back when Honesty has just come out. I said to myself “This guy- he’s a black guy, only 9000 followers and is on the cover– he has to have a team.“ I found his manager through some research and DM’d him, sent him my discography, basically asked if he would be willing to have a meeting with me. I’m not ashamed. Even on my tour with John Legend I had just tweeted asking “Somone tell him to let me open for him!” A lot of being independent has been the hustle of just asking for help.”

Well, if you have an opening on your press team…

“[Laughs] Well, then we’d have to pay you!”

Right. Well, let’s pivot back to your music. It has an incredible energy and groove; how did you go about capturing that?

“I grew up in Mississippi, but similar to Indiana’s proximity [to Kentucky], I just would drive to Memphis, near Stax.”

Oh ok, very very cool! I’ve been to their record museum. 

“Yeah! So when you think of my costumes and hair, that’s all from [artists like] Isaac Hayes, Carla Thomas. They would come out in bright colors, sharp. It’s this Black afro-futurism. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the documentary for WattsStax, but I’m heavily influenced by Black artists from that period. I feel like just being a kid growing up in that area, too, it’s kind of in my blood.”

I get that. Moving to the present, what artists have you been listening to currently?

“Man, my brain is completely engulfed in Kendrick Lamar right now. Still trying to process that album. Sam Dew is one of my favorite artists. I gotta get into IDK; I just saw his Tiny Desk. There’s this girl called Layah. Fire. She does all her videos and designs. Fire.”

Being more noteworthy on sites now like Tiktok, and starting from your A Song a Day’s you used to post on YouTube, does it feel weird to be that close to interacting with your audience?

“I think I need to be more live. I can’t just hang out and talk, like on Instagram Live, you know? I’m very 1 on 1 and try to be engaging. I’m the friend in my friend circle who people call to tell about their problems.”

You’re like a sponge!

“Yeah, I’m the listener, I soak it all up. I think it’s a lot of pressure to make something like a Tiktok Dance, and it’s a bit abusive to artists to make it seem like that’s the only way to get big. There are more than one ways to try to get to the top.”

You can check out more of Kirby here on her Instagram and Twitter. Her newest record, Sis, He Wasn’t The One, is available now.

Photo Courtesy // Forecastle Festival //

The post KIRBY talks Forecastle 2022, Sis, He Wasn’t The One, and Stax Records appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

The Homies talk about the “Louisville Sound”, Shake, and their “Louisville Mount Rushmore” Monday, May 30 2022 

By Tate Luckey

Some consider Homies the 502’s next big rap group. They have close ties to Jack Harlow who headlined May 26, having opened for him during his “No Place Like Home” tour back in December. They have steadily built up a following with the locals, opening the first day of Forecastle Festival.

Before their show, The Homies sat down with The Louisville Cardinal to answer questions about their upcoming work and the pride they have for their city.

The group consists of Shloob, rapper/artist; Quiiso, the designated singer/songwriter for their hooks/melodies; Ace Pro, who takes on more lead visual creator roles, and 2forwOyNE, lead producer and engineer.

When you think about typical hip hop city “sounds”, they all are pretty defined. You have the East Coast with groups like A Tribe Called Quest, West Coast with producers like Suge Knight, or even Atlanta with groups like Outkast and TI. What defines the “Louisville Sound?”

Ace Pro – “It’s kind of funny, you mention collectives like Tribe. What the ‘Louisville sound’ is just kinda getting started, steadily evolving. You have artists like Bryson Tiller, EST Gee, and Harlow; With us, it’s more borrowing inspiration from lots of different places. We do have an identity, and try to color outside of the lines a lot.”

The Homies by Nathan Zucker for Forecastle

What is it about Louisville as a city to you that is so special?

2forwOyNE – “The city of Louisville is based on a sense of pride- we originally come from the home of Muhammad Ali, so it’s just the natural-born philanthropy and having the pride of being somebody from not that big of an ego city. It’s rare for someone to come here, make it to where we’re heading, we try to put the city on our back.”

Shloob – “Everybody here knows everybody. Everyone has groups of friends/cliques; we represent the group/brotherhood culture. I feel like we’re gonna make it catch on, it’s pretty cool.”

Let’s pivot to your newest music video that dropped, Shake, and your newest album. Can you detail a bit about the songwriting process? Do the verses come first, then the melody? Does someone in the group lead more of the creative control?

Ace Pro – “The Shake video was comprised of the vibe that we feel the song gives. It has that early 2000s bounce. We wanted to reflect that with a Hype Williams-esque video. So we have the fish eye, we have the light tunnel, and we built that up from scratch. We had a good team around us that helped build everything, but everything else comes straight from us.”

Quiiso – “The recording process for that song, we were winding down during a recording session, and wOyNE just started making a beat and I put that first verse out there. As far as our recording process for that song, it’s pretty organic, but sometimes some of us write before we hear anything, and sometimes we’re rapping as the beat is coming out. We’re trying to get more in a process of fluidity. As things are being made, hooks are written, someone’s doing this…everyone’s doing something.”

Do you guys get nervous at all performing? What’s next after Forecastle Festival?

Shloob – “I feel like it’s situational. For me, I’m used to performing, it’s like muscle memory, but if it’s winging it, I’m a bundle of nerves. Some people take shots, or meditate/pray. It’s situational.”

The Homies by Nathan Zucker for Forecastle

Last question for you guys: If you had to make a Louisville Mount Rushmore, who’s on it?

Ace Pro – “Well I mean, it’s gotta be Quiiso, Ace, Shloob, and 2fo.”

2fo – “Facts, haha.”

Ace Pro – “No, but, if we weren’t being biased, we’d say Static Major, Bryson Tiller, Jack, and… then the Homies, again.”

No Muhammad Ali?

Ace Pro – “Oh! I thought you were just talking about music. My bad, then uh, York (Lewis and Clark), Ali, Static Major, and Jennifer Lawrence. Diane Sawyer.

Shloob – “Charles too man, shoutout Charles Booker.”

More about The Homies can be found here. Their latest album, Honest Living, is available to listen to now.

Photo Courtesy // Forecastle Festival //

The post The Homies talk about the “Louisville Sound”, Shake, and their “Louisville Mount Rushmore” appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

Gallery: Forecastle Festival 2019 Sunday, Jul 14 2019 

Crowd singing.

Forecastle Festival 2019 dropped anchor on Friday, July 12, opening its gates to an anxious crowd huddled outside the perimeter of Louisville’s Waterfront Park. Temperatures hovered in the mid to upper 80s, and word on the street was that the heat was only going to rise each day, culminating in a scorching Sunday afternoon. The […]

In episode 42, we review all the excitement of the last couple… Monday, Mar 17 2014 



In episode 42, we review all the excitement of the last couple weeks – a fourth, successful FacetimeLou, a weekend getaway to a cabin outside Bagdad, Kentucky (no, that is not misspelled), Humana Festival, and the governor’s decision to appeal Judge Heyburn’s ruling on out-of-state same-sex marriages. Linda also tries to help Melissa differentiate between Outkast and the Black-Eyed Peas.

This episode, we’re looking forward to:

-Wizard World Louisville Comic Con - March 28-30  

-Savage Rose’s King Lear - March 21-30

-The library’s photo exhibit on the 40th anniversary of the 1974 tornado  - now through April 5th

-GonzoFest -  March 31-April 5

-More crawfish boils at Selena’s on March 26th and April 2nd (watch out, that website plays zydeco).

This episode, the Veronica Mars movie is melting Melissa’s butter. Linda visited the Reynolds Grocery Company on Frankfort and spent all her money on bulk spices and snacks.

Who are you most excited about at Forecastle? What completely different bands do you confuse in your mind? Got a better suggestion than “Crawfish Queen” for Melissa’s title when guiding people through their first crawdad boil? Tweet us at @LouNotKY, tell us on Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast and leave us a review in iTunes.

Thanks for listening!

ICYMI (though surely you didn’t) – Forecastle Lineup. Got… Tuesday, Mar 11 2014 



ICYMI (though surely you didn’t) - Forecastle Lineup. Got your tickets yet? 

fuckyeahlouisville:

shortmom:

Holy shit. Forecastle 2014 lineup.

So. Yeah.

We recorded episode 41 at Startup Weekend Louisville (which was… Monday, Mar 3 2014 



We recorded episode 41 at Startup Weekend Louisville (which was in Indiana). We chatted with a few of the participants – you can learn more about their projects here.

March still looks a lot like February, but as always, there’s lots to do. What we’re really looking forward to is FaceTime Lou, which we’re hosting for the first time. Please join us and your Twitter friends at El Camino on Thursday, March 13th at 6:30. Let us know you’re coming by RSVPing here.

In the meantime, mark your calendars for:

-Forecastle announcing this year’s lineup on March 4th

-One Hundred Fascinating Louisville Women panel discussion at the library on March 5th

-Drop & Date night at the Kentucky Science Center on March 7th and April 4th

-Banner Year - New Works by Bryan Patrick Todd opens at WHY Louisville Two on Friday, March 7th at 5 pm

-and The St. Patrick’s Day parade on March 15th

This episode, the Belle of Lousville is melting Melissa’s butter. Linda is lost in Game of Thrones, but took a break to read this article about five generations of a family who have been guides in Mammoth Cave.

What’s melting your butter? Will you be joining us at FaceTime Lou? Let us know on Facebook, Twitter, or at louisvillenky at gmai (still working on regularly checking that, so the other two are definitely better options).

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or check us out on Soundcloud. Thanks for listening!