Pros and Cons of Attending College for Free Wednesday, Jun 23 2021 

By Jacob Maslow–Branded Content

At one time or another, everyone thinks about going to college. While the choice of education is entirely up to you, there is one thing that will always be a deciding factor, which is the cost. Despite there being many ways to pay for college, it can strain on your finances. Paying out of pocket can leave a huge dent in your bank account while loans can affect your overall credit score if not paid on time. This leads to a question many people have asked: should college be free? Here are the pros and cons of getting a college education for free.

Pro: It Allows Everyone to Get an Education

In a perfect world, everyone is able to pay for the education they deserve. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. There are a lot of people who are unable to go to college because they can’t afford it. What’s worse is that they might not be approved for a loan either. Since a college education is necessary for most jobs these days, you would think everyone would be provided with tuition-free schooling. That way, people would be able to live well while boosting the economy.

Pro: Student Debt Would Be Completely Eliminated

One of the most common forms of debt is undoubtedly student loan debt. Regardless of the level of degree a student earns, they usually walk away with some amount of student debt. In fact, taking out a student loan from a private lender is how most people afford the high cost of college. Student debt can put a lot of strain on you both mentally and financially, so making college free would alleviate a lot of this unnecessary stress. Being able to attend for free would probably increase the attendance rate as well.

Con: Many People Wouldn’t Understand How to Properly Finance

Let’s be honest, going to college for free does sound like a dream come true. However, it may not be as great an idea as you think. College is a place where you go to learn and sharpen your basic life skills. One of these includes managing your finances properly. Although the debt can be a hindrance, it also teaches us how critical budgeting and saving is. Without this crucial skill, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see people spend their money and then struggle to make monthly house or car payments.

Con: The Value of College Would Decrease

It’s kind of shocking to know how many people underestimate the value of college. Going to a university for free might decrease the overall value of a college degree, including a Ph.D. It’s the idea of getting a good job that ultimately motivates us to keep working hard and mastering the skills of our chosen program. Honestly, what people truly want is to have the cost of college reduced, not entirely free. If people were allowed to college any time they wanted with no risk or reason, they might not see the benefit of earning their degree.

Photo Courtesy of Jacob Maslow // Cosmic Press

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Why Shiba Inus Are Great Dogs For Families Thursday, May 6 2021 

By Jacob Maslow–Branded Content

Ever since the “Doge MEME” hit the went internet viral in 2010, everyone wants a doge of their own. These adorable dogs have hit the world by storm. They are so cute, and when you see them, you want to give them a smush and call them the best boy or girl. :)

More About The Shiba Inus Breed

Shiba Inus were initially bred in Japan. They were bred to assist hunters in the mountains of Japan. That is why they are of a smaller size and very agile. The average life span of this breed is 12 to 15 years. A full-grown Shina Inus may weigh up to 24 lbs. 

The most common coloring of a Shiba Inus is red sesame. However, they can also have Black & Tan, Black Sesame, Cream, Red, or Sesame coloring. They are born with floppy ears that will start to stand straight up as they age. They have a short double coat so that they will shed twice a year heavily.

What Make the Shiba Inus The Best Boy or Girl

Shiba Inus are brilliant and can learn to understand you; when they are very young, they start to associate a particular word with feeding, walking, going to bed, and any other thing they will often do. They will begin to associate that word with that activity. It will become so bad you will have to spell out the word if you do not want to do the associated activity.

The Shiba Inus is a very loyal, faithful, confident, and fearless pup. They will charm you and every other person they meet.  This breed can be stubborn. This means you will need to be patient and start training the day you get your pup home. Be strict but never punish your pup physically. 

Shiba Inus are very intelligent and curious. This makes them a great family dog because they will always be excited about new family adventures and want to play all the time. They need plenty of enrichment toys to keep their brains busy. They will love toys that challenge them.

The Perfect Dog for Summer

Shiba Inus loves activity; they are very agile dogs. If you have a very active lifestyle, this is an excellent dog for you. This doge was made for hiking and camping and will love going everywhere you go. They will need regular exercise to release their energy, and taking them along on a family hike is a perfect way to tire them out. 

If you introduce this breed to water early, they will learn to love swimming, and you can take them to play with your family all year round. This breed is very playful and will be the perfect addition to all your family’s summer adventures this summer. Make sure to pack plenty of water for your doge and the rest of your family when you take these summer outings. 

It’s Time to Bring Home Your Very Own Doge

Now that you know how perfect the Shiba Inus breed is, add one to your family. Remember to start training from day one and make sure they have a crate to spend time in when no one can supervise them. Be patient while training them because they are known to be stubborn.

If you are patient and you and your family build a bond with your Shiba Inus pup, they will be the best dog you have ever known. They are intelligent, loyal, and curious dogs that make a perfect addition to any family. Start the search for your doge today, and you will be on a hike with them in no time.

Photo Courtesy of Jacob Maslow // Cosmic Press

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Theatre students walk out of rehearsal to protest treatment from department faculty Monday, Apr 26 2021 

By Eli Hughes–

The Theatre Arts Undergraduate Student Union held an open meeting with theatre faculty on April 22 to discuss issues within the department, which have led to the formation of the union and a walkout from rehearsal of their show Hashtag on April 16.

The walkout included undergraduate performers and crew including stage management, acting, lights, costumes and scene design.

“This is a demonstration of undergraduate student impact on the U of L theatre department. We acknowledge that this is an inconvenience for many involved in this technical process, and that’s the point we’re trying to make,” the members of the union said in a flyer that was left behind in the theatre building and distributed during the walkout.

“We encourage you to go back and try to work. Who is missing? Who is needed in this space that has disappeared.”

One of the issues these students spoke out about includes the culture of burnout they claim is fostered by the department.

“Undergrad students in this department have just felt totally not supported and exploited. Everyone gets burnt out. I know people who finish their degree and never want to do theatre again,” said Loren Moody, senior theatre major.

Aiden Stivers, a senior theater major, said the issues are especially prominent during tech week.

“I think it’s important to note that specifically tech week has been literally hell week for a lot of undergraduates,” Stivers said. “Especially undergraduates in the technical departments, because we are often put in leadership roles that we don’t get a lot of training for or we don’t feel secure in and we are left to kind of scramble around and figure out how to do it.”

Students also reported a lack of communication in the department and said that was something they hoped to change.

“We’ve taken steps to start that, but this walkout is really intended to remind them that we haven’t forgotten about the issues and problems that we’ve had in the past that many students have suffered through and also to remind them of the weight we hold in this department, so that they take us seriously and they know that fixing our issues is of utmost importance,” Colton Bachinkski, a sophomore theatre major said.

Other issues mentioned on the student union’s list of grievances include a lack of acting opportunities for undergraduates, a history of faculty misgendering transgender students, lack of response to sexual assault and sexual harassment claims, and a lack of preparing students for their professional careers.

Nefertiti Burton, chair of the Department of Theater Arts, said she supported the students decision to form a student union but was confused by the decision to walk out after a time had already been set to meet and talk about these concerns.

“The students had immediately accepted and confirmed the meeting,  so I was totally confused as to why they would take this action after scheduling the meeting,” Burton said. “This was especially troubling since this predominantly white group of students chose to walk out of the tech process on an African American Theatre Program production that was developed by students to address the anti-black and social justice movements dominating our nation’s attention at this moment.”

Miranda Cisneros, the technical production manager for the department, said she fully supports the students’ decision to form a union, but disagreed with the timing of the walkout for the same reasons. She also added the play centers around racial injustice and policing so she believed that the show deserved everyone’s full attention.

“The majority of the undergraduate student union is comprised of white students and I think that was a big oversight for them to walk out,” she said.

According to Burton, at the meeting on April 22, students apologized for walking out during an AATP production and clarified their intentions.

“They explained that it was meant to illustrate how important undergrads are to the department, and they apologized for taking that action on an AATP show,” she said.

“They stated that they had not considered what kind of message the walkout of a predominantly white group of students might send and the impact it could have on many in the department. The students also stated several times that many of their grievances were related to circumstances that are in the past and they have already seen progress. They expressed appreciation for the faculty and staff and our efforts to make change.”

Following the meeting, Hunter Dischley, a junior theater major, said she had mixed feelings about the response they received. “They seemed receptive to all of our goals and all that, but they also didn’t remember some of the stuff we had told them previously.”

Cisneros believes that the theatre department has been moving forward with the unions concerns in mind since the formation of the union and that they will continue to move forward. “As a recent alum of this department, I would say that the amount of change that I have seen in the department since I graduated is revolutionary,” Cisneros said.

Burton said she and the rest of the faculty and staff plan to reflect on what was discussed at the meeting and move forward to address the student’s concerns.

“I learned a great deal from the students,” she said. “And I recognize that there is a lot more that faculty can do to uplift the importance and value of undergraduate labor in our productions. The students identified issues in the curriculum and course scheduling that I will consider carefully and adjust where possible. They also spoke to issues of climate and culture in the department relative to transgender students that I will take immediate action to address.”

“I am grateful that the students are eager to collaborate with faculty and staff to make the Theatre Arts department a better place to learn and work, and I foresee positive change in 2021-2022.”

Graphic by Eli Hughes//The Louisville Cardinal

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Exhibit dedicated to Breonna Taylor opens at the speed Art Museum Monday, Apr 19 2021 

By Tate Luckey

A  new exhibit at the Speed Art Museum, called “Promise, Witness, Remembrance,” reflects on the life of Breonna Taylor and the resulting protests around Louisville and the world. Taylor was killed in her home by Louisville Metro police officers in March of last year.

The exhibit features work curated by Allison Glenn, a contemporary art curator, and seeks to explore the nation’s “reflection on the promise, witness, and remembrance of too many black lives lost to gun violence.”

The section “Promise” explores the ideologies of the US, while “Witness” addresses the moments and finally, “Remembrance,” which reflects on the legacies of those affected.

The exhibit is available now until June 6 and is free to U of L students. More information about the exhibit can be found here.


Photos by Anthony Riley // The Louisville Cardinal

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Men’s tennis sweep No. 38 Middle Tennessee in second matchup of the season Friday, Apr 2 2021 

By Riley Vance —

Men’s tennis upset No. 38 Middle Tennessee on Thursday with a 4-0 sweep at the Bass-Rudd Tennis Center. The Cards played the Blue Raiders earlier in the season at Middle Tennessee and faced a tough loss.

To start off doubles, Louisville secured wins on courts one and two.

Senior Tin Chen and junior Sergio Hernandez took down Tom Moonen and Chris Edge (MTSU) with an easy 6-1 win.

No. 60 junior Fabien Salle and sophomore Matthew Fung breezed by with a 6-2 win over No. 77 Pavel Motl and Stijn Slump to clinch the doubles point for the Cards.

The match on court three was left unfinished. Junior Alex Wesbrooks and freshman Kyle Tang were tied at 4-4 with Francisco Rocha and Max Rauch (MTSU).

Louisville kicked off singles with junior Josh Howard-Tripp defeating Middle Tennessee’s Edge 6-4, 6-4.

Advancing the score to 3-0, No. 56 Hernandez took over court two with a 6-4, 6-4 win over Moonen (MTSU).

Salle was able to overcome Slump (MTSU) in a third set (6-1, 3-6, 6-3) to clinch the match for Louisville.

Matches on courts one, five and six were left unfinished.

Chen won his first set 6-4 against No. 37 Rocha (MTSU) and was down 3-5 in the second set.

Fung won his first set 7-6 and was tied at 3-3 against Motl (MTSU) in the second set.

Junior David Mizrahi won his first set 7-5 and was tied at 5-5 against Rauch (MTSU) in the second set.

The Cards face Notre Dame for the second time this season on Saturday, April 3 at 1 p.m. at the Courtney Tennis Center in South Bend, Indiana.

 

Final Scores:

Singles

  1. Tin Chen (LOU) vs. #37 Francisco Rocha (MTSU) 6-4, 3-5, unfinished
  2. #56 Sergio Hernandez (LOU) def. Tom Moonen (MTSU) 6-4, 6-4
  3. Fabien Salle (LOU) def. Stijn Slump (MTSU) 6-1, 3-6, 6-3
  4. Josh Howard-Tripp (LOU) def. Chris Edge (MTSU) 6-4, 6-4
  5. Matthew Fung (LOU) vs. Pavel Motl (MTSU) 7-6 (4-0), 3-3, unfinished
  6. David Mizrahi (LOU) vs. Max Rauch (MTSU) 7-5, 5-5, unfinished

Order of Finish: 4, 2, 3

Doubles

  1. #60 Fabien Salle/Matthew Fung (LOU) def. #77 Pavel Motl/Stijn Slump (MTSU) 6-2
  2. Tin Chen/Sergio Hernandez (LOU) def. Tom Moonen/Chris Edge (MTSU) 6-1
  3. Alex Wesbrooks/Kyle Tang (LOU) vs. Francisco Rocha/Max Rauch (MTSU) 4-4, unfinished

Order of Finish: 2, 1

 

Photo Courtesy of Taris Smith // GoCards

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Men’s tennis secures 4-1 win against Florida State Monday, Mar 29 2021 

By Riley Vance —

Men’s tennis (7-7, 2-5) defeated Florida State (6-12, 1-7) 4-1 on March 28 at the Scott Speicher Memorial Tennis Center in Tallahassee, Florida.

Florida State had a strong start to the match as they secured wins on courts two and three to clinch the doubles point.

FSU’s Andreja Petrovic and Chase Wood took down juniors Alex Wesbrooks and Josh Howard-Tripp 6-4.

To tie the score, No. 70 sophomore Matthew Fung and junior Fabien Salle defeated No. 72 Alex Knaff and Sebastian Arcila (FSU).

On court two, junior Sergio Hernandez and senior Tin Chen fell 7-5 to Loris Pourroy and Marcus Walters (FSU).

The Cards bounced back and won four straight matches in singles.

Chen took over court one with a 6-3, 6-4 win over FSU’s Knaff.

Fung tallied another point for the cards with a 6-4, 6-3 win over Walters (FSU).

Junior David Mizrahi defeated Petrovic (FSU) in a third set (6-2, 0-6, 7-5) to bring the overall score to 3-0.

The match was clinched on court two as Salle won a hard-fought match against FSU’s Pourroy (4-6, 6-4, 6-4).

Matches on courts three and four were left unfinished.

No. 63 Hernandez won his first set 7-5 and was down 5-6 in the second set, and Howard-Tripp split sets and was tied in the third set.

The Cards host Middle Tennessee Thursday, April 1 at 2 p.m. at the Bass-Rudd Tennis Center.

 

Final Scores:

Singles

  1. Tin Chen (LOU) def. Alex Knaff (FSU) 6-3, 6-4
  2. Fabien Salle (LOU) def. Loris Pourroy (FSU) 4-6, 6-4, 6-3
  3. #63 Sergio Hernandez (LOU) vs. Richard Thongoana (FSU) unfinished, 7-5, 5-6
  4. Josh Howard-Tripp (LOU) vs. Sebastian Arcila (FSU) unfinished, 4-6, 6-4, 1-1
  5. Matthew Fung (LOU) def. Marcus Walters (FSU) 6-4, 6-3
  6. David Mizrahi (LOU) def. Andreja Petrovic (FSU) 6-2, 0-6, 7-5

Order of Finish: 1, 5, 6, 2

Doubles

  1. #70 Matthew Fung/Fabien Salle (LOU) def. #72 Alex Knaff/Sebastian Arcila (FSU) 6-4
  2. #62 Loris Pourroy/Marcus Walters (FSU) def. Sergio Hernandez/Tin Chen (LOU) 7-5
  3. Andreja Petrovic/Chase Wood (FSU) def. Josh Howard-Tripp/Alex Wesbrooks (LOU)

Order of Finish: 3, 1, 2

 

Photo Courtesy of GoCards

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Louisville baseball heads to North Carolina for this weekend’s series of matches Thursday, Mar 18 2021 

By Hannah Walker —

The No. 7 Louisville baseball team will be heading down to North Carolina for a weekend of matches. They will be playing their 17th game this season against NC State starting March 19 at 6:30 p.m. The two teams will also be playing at 2 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. on Sunday.

After taking a loss against Eastern Kentucky University on March 16, the Cardinals are hoping to win this away-game series. The last time these two teams played in a weekend series against one another, Louisville made a clean sweep and won all three games against the Tar Heels.

Sophomore infielder Alex Binelas was the star player this weekend last season, as well as sophomore catcher Henry Davis. However, after Tuesday’s performance, the fans are left wondering whether U of L will take home a win from NC State this year.

After the weekend series, Louisville will return home to play at Jim Patterson Stadium on March 23 against Western Kentucky at 6:00 p.m.

Photo Courtesy of Stephen Williams // U of L Athletics 

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Louisville baseball takes a loss against EKU after a weekend of wins Wednesday, Mar 17 2021 

By Hannah Walker —

Louisville’s No. 7 baseball team lost on Mar. 16 to Eastern Kentucky University at Earle Comb’s Stadium with a final score of 3-6. The Cardinals kept a steady tie with EKU for most of the game, but that tie was broken during the bottom of the seventh inning when Eastern scored three points.

Kicking the game off, freshman Seamus Barrett, starting pitcher for U of L, was successfully able to face 11 batters and have 1 ground out during the first couple innings; making a decent start for Louisville.

During the top of the first inning, Louisville made their first point when sophomore catcher Henry Davis singled through left field and junior outfielder Luke Brown scored. However, EKU followed this performance when they scored 2 points during the bottom of the first half.

It wasn’t long till Louisville started to catch back up to EKU on the scoreboard though. During the top of the second inning, junior infielder/outfielder Cameron Masterman made a homerun to left center; giving Louisville a one point lead.

Louisville continued to play at their best when sophomore infielder Alex Binelas filed out to center field and freshman infielder Christian Knapczyk scored during the top of the third inning. Still, EKU stayed on their toes when they made another point during the bottom of the fourth inning. This tied things up for a score of 3-3 going into the fifth inning.

No points were scored during the fifth or sixth inning, but EKU was successfully able to score three points during the bottom of the seventh inning. The game stayed steady during the eighth and ninth inning and resulted in a loss for Louisville with a score of 3-6.

Louisville will play their next game on Mar. 19 at 6:30 p.m. against the North Carolina Tar Heels on Bryson Field at Boshamer Stadium.

File Photo // The Louisville Cardinal

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How to screen stocks Sunday, Mar 14 2021 

By Jacob Maslow — Branded Content

The science of stock screening has been around for more than a century, even since there were large, centralized exchanges where people could buy and sell corporate ownership shares. Indeed, some of the most effective screening methods are as old as the hills, but they are ever-popular because they give investors peace of mind. None of the methods listed below guarantees that you’ll screen out faulty, weak companies and screen in the best ones.

However, logic can be the best guide when you examine the reasoning behind each of the techniques. For millions of active traders and investors, it’s helpful to combine several of the strategies. Here’s the general philosophy behind each of the four major screening systems.

PE Ratio

P/E ratio, or price-per-earnings ratio, as a way of identifying financially strong companies is one of the simplest and most favored selection tools. There are two steps to calculating the number. First, find earnings-per-share by dividing the company’s earnings by the number of outstanding shares. Then, divide the share price (P) by the earnings-per-share (E). If the number is below 15, it’s said that the stock is a good buy. P/E ratios above 15 indicate an issue that is too expensive and thus does not represent a wise investment.

Penny Stocks

The most accessible screening tool of all asks a question: “is the share priced below $5?” If the answer is yes, then it’s classified as a penny stock and comes with all sorts of unique features, some positive and some negative. However, some traders only deal in this segment, while others avoid it. So many active investors opt of penny-shares because you don’t need a ton of capital to get started.

Here’s an example of using two tools at the same time. Look at a list of companies you’re thinking about investing in. Assume there are 250 corporate names on the roster. First, you might decide to eliminate all the non-penny offerings, and end up with (again, just as an example) 50 company names remaining. Next, you’d eliminate all the ones whose P/E ratio is above 15. Perhaps that would leave you with ten or so candidates, from which you could further screen or opt to purchase all of them.

News

The internet makes a news-search easy. Find all recent news stories on any corporation you have on your might buy list. Look for negative and positive news from within the past six months or an entire year. There are no hard-and-fast rules with this technique, but once you’re finished reading, you’ll have an excellent feel for how the organization is doing in terms of overall performance, profits, and prospects.

The Trend

Charts come in handy for research, and you’ll need them to find the price trend of the shares that interest you. This screen involves eliminating any company that is not in a current up-trend, defined by the 50-day moving average above the 200-day moving average. This simple method is often used as an initial screen by long-term investors.

Photo Courtesy of Jacob Maslow // Cosmic Press

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A&S freezes spending amid $1.6 million budget shortfall Sunday, Mar 14 2021 

By Eli Hughes–

Interim Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences David Owen announced to A&S faculty on March 9 that a temporary spending freeze would take effect from now until June 30. This decision comes after A&S reported a budget shortfall of more than $1.6 million for the current fiscal year due to low enrollment this year.

“Enrollments in A&S fell below budgeted targets in the fall and spring semesters, and we are now projecting a revenue shortfall in the current fiscal year of $1,684,991, while expenditures are trending as budgeted,” Owen said in the email announcement. “I ask for your help to close this gap between revenues and expenditures.”

He went on to say that this shortfall can be addressed by increasing revenues through higher enrollment in late-start spring semester classes and summer classes, as well as by reducing expenditures through general funds spending freeze.

When The Cardinal reached out to Owen for comment he said this spending freeze will only affect non-essential expenditures.

“The spending freeze will not affect students or impact our academic mission. Its purpose is to reduce spending on expenses that are not immediately essential to our academic and research missions and that can be held off until next year,” Owen said.

Owen also said that the spending freeze was only one piece of the plan to address the budget shortfall, “We are striving to increase enrollments by offering more late-start spring courses than in the past and offering a wide-range of summer courses. We had previously set aside a portion of the budget for possible revenue shortfalls, and those funds will be used. Lastly, we will apply some of the funds carried over from last year to close this budget deficit.”

The underlying cause of this decrease in enrollment that led to the shortfall is not certain at this time but Owen attributes many of the problems to the fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The budget shortfall is due to lower than expected enrollments in A&S, which I expect has multiple causes. Part of this is due to some students choosing to step away from their studies because of the many additional financial, personal, and emotional stresses created by the pandemic, and some may be because some students prefer in-person learning,” Owen said.

In the email, Owen laid out specific guidelines for what expenses the spending freeze would affect:

  • This applies only to general fund accounts.
  • Recurring expenses, expenses already incurred and all invoices received will need to be paid.
  • Does not impact current faculty tenure-line or term searches. Requests for staff hires will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.
  • This will not affect any spending from research grants, RIF accounts and start-up funds.
  • This will not affect spending from endowments and current use gift accounts.
  • For all other general fund expenses, you should work with your UBM-I to request pre-approval.

Owen believes that this spending freeze can help the department address the financial problems it’s facing while still maintaining its academic mission.

“A&S faculty have worked tirelessly to provide the best possible online learning experiences possible during this past year,” Owen said. “Arts & Sciences degrees provide an exceptional value in the 21st century. By learning how to learn, A&S graduates are well-prepared for highly dynamic and unpredictable career paths, and A&S graduates have the knowledge and skills to tackle many of the challenges our communities face.”

Graphic by Joseph Garcia // The Louisville Cardinal

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