A status quo agreement was an agreement signed between the new independent lords of India and Pakistan and the princely states of the Anglo-Indian Empire before their integration into the new reigns. The form of the agreement was bilateral between a government and a spring state. It provided that all administrative agreements between the British crown and the State would remain unchanged between the signatory regime (India or Pakistan) and the spring state until new agreements were concluded. [1] The draft status quo agreement was drawn up on 3 June 1947 by the political department of the British-Indian government. The agreement provided that all administrative agreements of “common interest” between the British Crown and a particular signatory state would be kept unchanged between the signatory regime (India or Pakistan) and the State until new agreements are concluded. A separate timetable set out issues of common interest. During the discussion, Jawaharlal Nehru, India`s future prime minister, expressed doubts about whether the agreement should cover only “administrative” issues. Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the future Governor General of Pakistan, spoke in his favour. [2] The state of Jammu and Kashmir, bordering India and Pakistan, has decided to remain independent. She offered to sign status quo agreements with both gentlemen.

Pakistan immediately agreed, but India called for further talks. Soon the Nizams found themselves under pressure from Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen (Ittehad), the Muslim nationalist party that was active in the state and withdrew from the agreement. [8] On the morning of 27 October, Qasim Rizvi, the leader of Ittehad, organized a massive demonstration by several thousand activists to block the delegation`s withdrawal. He convinced Nizam that, as India was then linked to the defence of Kashmir, it did not exceed sufficient resources to put pressure on Hyderabad. He claimed that a Hyderabad princess could get a much more favorable deal. [9] Nizam then appointed a new delegation, dominated by members of the Executive Council opposed to the previous agreement. [10] Former Hyderabad bureaucrat Mohammed Hyder called the event the “October coup.” From that moment on, Qasim Rizvi began calling the gunfire in the Hyderabad administration. [11] The new delegation obtained only trivial amendments to the old draft agreement. [12] It established that all subsequent agreements and administrative arrangements between the British Crown and Nizam would be maintained with the Indian government. These include defence, foreign affairs and communication (the three themes that are normally addressed in the accession instrument).

The agents would be exchanged between Hyderabad and India.