Thank you for your clear and helpful answers on this matter. I have problems with mixtures of singular plural subjects, where it would seem that an argument can be made for any form. What`s good about the following examples? I do not agree with your use of the plural form in the reference to “team or collaborator”. I heard recently that a national journalist used a plural newspaper when referring to a married couple – she used it twice. This is what led me to examine it, because it is contrary to what I learned in public school (1937-1950). I know that language is evolving, but I will continue to use the singular verbage with all collective nouns, and if I usually hear, it will continue to rub the nerves. The word group is a collective name. Collective names can be difficult, as it is up to the author of the sentence to determine whether the name acts as an entity or whether the whole indicates more individuality. In your sentence, if there is a program and you want to emphasize that the school group meets as an entity to sponsor the program, you should write “Carmel Group of Schools invites you…” If you want to point out that all three schools are sponsoring the event, write “Carmel Group of Schools invites you invite you…” What about the name “Goal”? In this case, that is the purpose of a trial. Today, a process has a large number of steps, practices and procedures, and its purpose is therefore multi-faceted. When I said “The purpose of the process is (a, b, c and d.)”, the editor corrected it on “the goals are”.

I`m not sure I agree, because a – d are all parts of the goal, not elements from which you can choose and select. What do you think about it? The example above implies that others, with the exception of Hannah, like to read comics. Therefore, plural obsedation is the right form. The pronoun that only concerns human beings, but it is a myth that it may not concern both human beings and things. It`s been going on for centuries. For example, the king-james version of the Bible refers to “He who is sinless.” We will recognize this use in the eleventh edition of The Blue Book of Grammar and Interctuation, which will be published in February 2014. . .